Latino USA

Archive for the ‘LGBT’ Category

Breaking: Queergyztan Declares Independence

For our fiction edition, Latino USA producer Camilo Vargas takes a shot at news parody by reporting on the foundation of a gay state:

Representatives from gay districts of the world’s capitals have announced the foundation of the gay nation of Queergyztan after a brunch near UN Headquarters in New York. The announcement comes after a sweeping wave of anti-gay legislation in Central Africa, Australia and several US states.  The queer founders initially vetted buying islands from troubled economies like Puerto Rico, Spain or Greece. But Western powers decided the new gay nation will be located at the heart of the Persian Gulf, where permitted homosexual activity was first documented in ancient Assyrian-Mesopotamian territories. The new rainbow shaped nation will form a tri-national border with Kuwait, Iraq and Iran. Newscaster Satireus Temple-Arcton reports the historic declaration and the responses from world leaders. Latino USA producer Camilo Vargas gets reactions from the streets of New York.

 

Frank Garcia Hejl

Our “newscaster” is Frank Garcia Hejl, a writer and actor in the New York sketch group Onassis. He is also a member of the UCB weekend team Bucky. His favorite film of all time is a tie between Ghostbusters and Gremlins. Seriously. He is a graduate of the University of North Texas with a degree in Sociology and English.

 

 

 

 

contributors1

C4_CamiloVargasHeadShotCamilo Vargas went from his native Colombia to the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He joined Latino USA after a fellowship with Univision Noticias and Univision’s Investigative Unit. Before coming to the US, Camilo was a researcher in conflict studies and US-Latin America relations for the Colombian government and the Universidad de los Andes in Bogota.

 

 

 

Photo by Ilia Yefimovich/Getty Images

 

 

This Week’s Captions: LA LUCHA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This edition of Latino USA is all about “la lucha”-the fight or struggle-from the ongoing efforts of business leaders and activists to reform immigration policy to songwriter Robi Draco Rosa’s fight against cancer. Also: fights on cable news, one Spanish-language newspaper that’s fought for a hundred years for Latinos, a small town’s struggle for clean water, and words of wisdom from a Mexican wrestler.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Sabiduría: Luchadores

For a few words of wisdom this week, we turn to the luchadores, the masked wrestlers of Mexico. Jasmine Garsd brings us the words of one fighter who’s been combating opponents in the ring, and homophobia in society. This luchador is part of Los Exóticos, a group of fighters in drag based in Mexico City.

Jasmine Garsd was born in Argentina and hosts NPR’s Alt.Latino podcast. As a journalist she’s worked on the NPR programs Morning Edition, Talk of the Nation and Tell Me More. She has covered a wide variety of topics for radio including immigration issues.

This Week’s Captions: Questions of Authority

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week’s Latino USA examines’ questions of authority: who abuses it? How do you get it? And how do you maintain it? We’ll hear the stories of veterans and law enforcement. We’ll hear from a New York councilman from community asserting its power, discuss authority in media with students, a professor, and Univision anchor Jorge Ramos. And we’ll hear from two authorities in acting, Eugenio Derbez and Rita Moreno.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

NYC Election Milestone

Latinos have made their power felt in the New York City mayor’s race in a way not seen before, with celebrities like John Leguizamo and Junot Diaz endorsing candidate Bill DeBlasio. And in Brooklyn, the first Mexican-American ever will be on the city council. Politician Carlos Menchaca visits the Latino USA studios and talks about being not only the first Mexican-American councilmember, but also the first openly gay legislator to represent Brooklyn.

Photo courtesy Carlos2013.com

B2CarlosMenchaca_KaitiArchambault

Carlos Menchaca is a product of public schools and public housing, He is a native of El Paso, Texas raised by a single mother who immigrated from Mexico,  In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Carlos worked day and night, bringing together local leaders, community groups, and everyday New Yorkers to coordinate response efforts and hold New York City, State, and Federal officials accountable.

As New York City Council member, Carlos will represent residents of the 38th Council District, which encompasses Sunset Park, Red Hook, Greenwood Heights, Borough Park, Windsor Terrace and Bay Ridge Towers.

 

 

This Week’s Captions: IMMIGRATION & DOMA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, Latino USA takes a look at the recent Supreme Court ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act and what it means for immigrant same-sex couples. Then, we explore the identity of people who are both Muslim and Latino. We’ll take a trip to Brazil to hear the accordion dance music known as forró. And Host Maria Hinojosa takes an Independence Day look at Lady Liberty’s immigration status.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Legalizing Love

On June 26th the US Supreme Court ruled the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional, paving the way for federal recognition of same-sex marriages and allowing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender immigrant couples to apply for the same immigration benefits as straight couples. Pablo Garcia Gamez and Santiago Ortiz, a married couple from Queens, New York, discuss how the DOMA ruling has already changed their lives. Then, Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Rachel Tiven, Executive Director of Immigration Equality, about the impact of the ruling.

Image courtesy of Immigration Equality/Judy G. Rolfe

 

To listen to more of Pablo and Santiago’s story, click HERE for the extended interview:

 

Santiago Ortiz and Pablo Garcia  Gamez
Santiago Ortiz and Pablo García Gamez have been together for 23 years. They married in Connecticut in 2011 and live in Elmhurst, Queens, New York. Santiago (left) was born in Manhattan’s Lower East Side to parents who migrated from Puerto Rico. Pablo (right) is a native of Venezuela, Caracas and has been living undocumented for over 20 years. He will now be able to apply for a green card as Santiago’s spouse. Once his immigration status is in order, he plans to begin teaching college Spanish.

Rachel Tiven is the Executive Director of Immigration Equality, a legal advocacy organization representing LGBTQ immigrants. Rachel received her law degree from Columbia Law School and her bachelor’s degree from Harvard.

 

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: STRAIGHT OUT OF COMMITTEE

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we bring you an update on the Senate immigration plan as it heads to the Senate floor. And we report from two of the dozens of schools shuttered in Chicago. We sit down with Dominican-American author Raquel Cepeda to talk about her memoir “Bird of Paradise: How I Became a Latina.” Finally, the premiere of “Rebel,” a story about the Cuban women who disguised herself as a man to fight in the Civil War.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

REFORM MOVES TO SENATE

The Gang of Eight’s immigration plan cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee this month. The bill is expected to hit the floor in June for a vote. María Hinojosa speaks to Ted Hesson, immigration editor at Fusion, and Julia Preston, New York Times national immigration correspondent.

Among the amendments approved this month is one that limits the use of solitary confinement inside detention centers, an issue we’ve followed closely and reported on.
Click HERE for a list of amendments.

 

Image courtesy of Commons/wikimedia.org.

TanyaJulia Preston was a member of The New York Times staff that won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for reporting on internationalaffairs for its series that profiled the corrosive effects of drug corruption in Mexico. Ms. Preston came to The Times in July 1995 after working at the Washington Post for nine years as a foreign correspondent. She is a 1997 recipient of the Maria Moors Cabot Prize for distinguished coverage of Latin America and a 1994 winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanitarian Journalism.

Lisa CarterTed Hesson is the immigration editor for Fusion, a joint venture of ABC News and Univision. Before joining the team in 2012, he served as online editor for Long Island Wins, a non-profit organization focusing on local and national immigration issues. Ted has written for a variety of magazines, newspapers, and online publications, including The Journal News, Time Out New York, and the Philadelphia City Paper. He earned his master’s degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and his bachelor’s degree at Boston College. He resides in Washington, D.C.

 

 

 

 

 

This Week’s Captions: “You Crazy?” Latinos and Mental Health

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we dedicate the entire show to the challenges that Latino youth face when dealing with mental health issues like anxiety, depression, peer pressure, and relationships. We hear the stories of three young Latinos coping with their culture while surviving the ups-and-downs of adolescence. But where do young Latinos turn for support? UC Davis professor Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola helps us put things in context.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

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THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

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