Latino USA

Archive for the ‘LGBT’ Category

You crazy? Latinos and Mental Health

Growing up can be an emotional rollercoaster. Where do Latino youth caught up between culture and universal challenges to emotional well-being go for support? We hear from three young Latinos and how they cope with anxiety, depression, peer pressure and relationships. We also speak to Dr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola, a professor and founding director of the UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Disparities.

Image courtesy of Nicole Plata.
Andrew Stelzer, Pauline Bartolone, and Jon Kalish contributed to this report.


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View our panel featuring these guests and more resources.

sergioDr. Sergio Aguilar-Gaxiola is a Professor of Clinical Internal Medicine, the Founding Director of the UC Davis Center for Reducing Health Disparities (CRHD), the Director of the Community Engagement Program of the UC Davis Clinical Translational Science Center (CTSC), and Co-Director of the National Institute of Aging (NIA) funded Latino Aging Research and Resource Center (LARRC).

claudiaClaudia Mendez is a 22 years old student at San Francisco State University. She was born and raised in the Mission District of San Francisco, CA, and was placed in foster care at the age of 16 because of family abuse. After realizing that there were many gaps in the foster care system, Claudia decided that she wanted to be an advocate for her community and help change different systems to better the lives of other young people. She is proudly a San Francisco State University Guardian Scholar pursuing a Bachelors degree in Comparative World Literature and plans to attend law school to become a dependency lawyer. She is also a member of Honoring Emancipated Youth and trainer at Transitional Youth Initiative. Besides school, some of Claudia’s hobbies are photography, soccer with friends and family, and scrapbooking.

nikkoNikko Reynoso is a Chicano trans* activist committed to social justice, gender equity, and anti-racist advocacy. From East Side San Jose, he speaks on issues relating to the intersections of identity, including sexuality, race, gender, and class. He is also a 3rd year UC Davis student studying Women and Gender studies, Chicana/o studies and Sociology.

nicoleNicole Plata is the Youth Initiatives Coordinator for the Mental Health Association of San Francisco. She is a passionate and uncompromising advocate for Transitional Aged Youth (TAY) in the mental health system. Her passion is rooted in her own experience with trauma and is inspired by the investment of her mentors and her faith in God.
She is a native of East Side San Jose, and identifies as a Mixed-Race Latina of Panamanian and Puerto Rican descent. Having overcome a variety of challenges in her youth, from abuse and community violence to involvement in the criminal justice system and a traumatic brain surgery, Nicole offers a well-informed perspective to those she works with. She seeks to use her perspective and experience to advocate and inform services for the diverse youth of California. She does this through her work for the Mental Health Association of San Francisco and her involvement on various Transition Age Youth advocacy groups within San Francisco County and statewide. In her free time, Nicole is an artist and muralist who loves to awaken her roots through salsa dancing.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: IMMIGRANTS AND SOLITARY CONFINEMENT

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we look into immigrants in solitary confinement. Is it necessary, and how is it being handled? Then, a group of fourth graders travel from California to Washington, DC, to demand that their classmate, Rodrigo Guzman, be allowed back into the United States. And, the Associated Press announced it will stop using the term “illegal immigrant.” So is this news or is it noise? Finally, we get a peek inside the tempestuous relationship between Mexican artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, in their own words.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Immigrants and Solitary Confinement

On any given day, some 300 people in U.S immigration detention centers are placed in special “segregation.” Researchers say the practice of solitary confinement can be especially detrimental to immigrant detainees’ mental health. Catherine Rentz, with the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University, looks at how widespread the practice is, why detainees are put in solitary, and how long they stay.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Catherine Rentz, The Investigative Reporting Workshop.  

CRentz-150x150Catherine Rentz is a reporter and documentary filmmaker in residence at the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University in Washington D.C. She’s produced several documentaries for PBS FRONTLINE about the airline industry, environmental resources, retirement finances, U.S. intelligence apparatus and immigration.

HOW ALEX ANWANDTER LIVES WITH HIMSELF

Chilean pop singer Alex Anwandter has become an icon of gay rights in Chile. He talks about his music, his lyrics and the inspiration behind his latest video.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photos courtesy of Nacho Rojas.

Check out the video for Cómo Puedes Vivir Contigo Mismo here:

Alex Anwandter is a Chilean singer, musician and producer. He was a vocalist for the band Teleradio Donoso until 2010. He recently released his solo record, Rebeldes on Nacional Records.

Adios, Chavelita

Singer Chavela Vargas was beloved throughout the continent for her rough yet tender voice singing songs of love gained and lost. She died August 5. Reporter Daniel Hernandez attended her very public wake in her adopted home, Mexico City.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of flickr.

Daniel Hernandez is a freelance journalist based in Mexico City and a news assistant in the Los Angeles Times bureau in Mexico. He’s been a staff writer at the L.A. Times and LA Weekly. A native of San Diego, Calif., Daniel is author of the 2011 book “Down & Delirious in Mexico City.”

Covering the 2012 International AIDS Conference

Since 2009, Latinos have accounted for 20 percent of new HIV infections in the US. Jasmine Garsd reports on the International AIDS conference held in Washington, DC. Conference attendees discussed a range of issues relating to Latinos, such as the need for education, the stigma attached to GLBT people in the Latino community and how immigration laws may hinder undocumented immigrants from seeking diagnosis or treatment.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Jasmine Garsd was born in Argentina and hosts NPR’s Alt.Latino podcast. As a journalist she’s worked on the NPR programs Morning Edition, Talk of the Nation and Tell Me More. She has covered a wide variety of topics for radio including immigration issues.

Noticiando: Familia es Familia

Ingrid Duran co-founded a newly launched campaign called “Familia es Familia,” aimed at fostering a greater acceptance of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people within the Latino Community. Host Maria Hinojosa talks with her and with Anthony Romero of American Civil Liberties Union.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Ingrid M. Duran is Co-Founder & Principal of D&P Creative Strategies, a company that she and partner Catherine founded in 2004 to increase the role of corporate, legislative and philanthropic efforts in addressing the concerns of Latinos, women, and gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (GLBT) communities. Prior to starting D&P, Ingrid was President & CEO of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute, where she expanded on an already extensive professional network that included members of Congress, elected officials and Fortune 500 executives.

Anthony D. Romero is the Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, the nation’s premier defender of liberty and individual freedom. He took the helm of the organization just four days before the September 11, 2001 attacks. Romero also led the ACLU in establishing the John Adams Project, a joint effort with the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers to assist the under-resourced military defense lawyers in the Guantánamo military commissions. Born in New York City to parents who hailed from Puerto Rico, Romero was the first in his family to graduate from high school. He is a graduate of Stanford University Law School and Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public Policy and International Affairs. He is a member of the New York Bar Association and has sat on numerous nonprofit boards.

Dr. Pedro Noguera

A growing rate of HIV/AIDS, low wages, and an ever-increasing incarceration rate are just some of the rampant challenges for Latino men. But if these issues are so important, why is there such little discussion among academics and policy makers? María Hinojosa talks to Dr. Pedro Noguera to find out. He’s a professor at New York University and co-editor of “Invisible No More: Understanding the Disenfranchisement of Latino Men and Boys.”

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Tough Love…

Being gay in the South Bronx isn’t easy. The moment you step out your door, you’re often defined by your neighborhood, your peers and by tradition. The struggle with self-identity and social acceptance is always there. That’s the premise of ‘Chulito,’ a new novel written by Puerto Rican-born author, Charles Rice-González. It tells the story of 16-year-old “Chulito” who’s in love with a friend from the neighborhood. Charles Rice-González is also gay and from the South Bronx. He joins us now to talk about his new book and about the importance of defining your own self instead of letting your environment and others define you.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Bienvenidos a Casa

Telenovelas and radio novelas are wildly popular all over the world and in the United States, and now the dramatic Latin soap operas are starting a dialogue about sexual orientation. “Bienvenidos a Casa” or “Welcome Home” is a dramatic radio novela that addresses the problems Gay and Lesbian teens face in Latino communities that are deeply rooted in religion and conservative family values. Radio Bilingue, a non-profit bilingual satellite station, worked with the “Family Acceptance Project” to use the highly popular format as a means for social change.

BBC Radio’s Alex Collins reports on the Latino LGBT reality and how this new radio program can help change lives and family relationships.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

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