Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Media Issues’ Category

This Week’s Captions: LA LUCHA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This edition of Latino USA is all about “la lucha”-the fight or struggle-from the ongoing efforts of business leaders and activists to reform immigration policy to songwriter Robi Draco Rosa’s fight against cancer. Also: fights on cable news, one Spanish-language newspaper that’s fought for a hundred years for Latinos, a small town’s struggle for clean water, and words of wisdom from a Mexican wrestler.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

News Or Noise: Talking Heads

In our ongoing feature on news literacy, we look at the talking heads who yell on television. A group of young journalists and media consumers teach us the best way to follow important news stories, and to see what’s behind all the screaming and yelling.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

 

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Elisha FieldstadtElisha Fieldstadt is a news junkie who thinks she’s incredibly fortunate to work in an industry she is so passionate about. She is editor-in-chief of Baruch’s Dollars & Sense magazine and an intern at NBCNews.com. She is also the creator of Veganthropology.wordpress.com and a contributing writer for BoomPopMedia.com. In her very little bit of spare time she does yoga, bikes, cooks, bakes and explores Manhattan, where she has lived for five years. You can follow her @el_fields.
Juan JaraJuan Jara is a senior in high school and the photographer for the North Star online newspaper. He hopes to be a film director someday and cannot wait to start his first feature film.

Anam BaigAnam Baig is the copy chief for The Ticker at Baruch College in New York City.

palm trees
Samantha Votzke is a high school student in Tampa, Florida.

Rossanna Rosado: Fighting To Tell The Story

Spanish language media has been around since the 19th Century but still struggles for respect from the rest of the media world. Maria Hinojosa speaks with Rossanna Rosado, publisher of New York’s El Diario La Prensa. The celebrated newspaper celebrates its centenary this year.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

And listen to Rosanna talk more about her experiences as a groundbreaking Latina journalist, and the history of Spanish-language media in the US, in the extended interview below:

RossanaRosado

Rossana Rosado has been a dominant force in New York media for 27 years. Using her Journalism degree from Pace University, she started as a City Hall reporter at El Diario La Prensa. She left the newspaper to join WPIX, Inc. as a Producer of Public A‑ airs programming. After rejoining El Diario La Prensa in 1995, she held the esteemed position of Editor in Chief, being the first woman to hold that position at the now 95 year old paper.

This Week’s Captions: ¡SALUD!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

¡Salud! This week Latino USA discusses questions of health. First, how stress and poverty can make you sick, and the latest on teen pregnancy. Then, Al Madrigal and Lalo Alcaraz talk Obamacare, and we check in with California, with stories of youth and rural health. Host Maria Hinojosa shares her newfound healthy enthusiasm for soccer, we hear about the wisdom of boxing, and we raise a glass to Latinos working in wine. All this, and social media reactions to the PBS “Latino Americans” series.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Awareness, Access, and Advertisements

The good news: overall, teen pregnancy is down. The bad: Latinas are still getting pregnant at a higher rate than other teens. Latino USA’s Daisy Rosario reports on how public health campaigns are trying to combat teen pregnancy, and why critics of these ads view them as “shaming.”

Photo by Diana Montaño

YoungMamas-Nicole_Angresano

Nicole Angresano is the Vice President of Community Impact for United Way of Greater Milwaukee. She oversees more than 160 United Way-funded health and human service programs, as well as leading United Way’s communitywide teen pregnancy prevention efforts aimed at reducing Milwaukee’s rate of births to teens by 46% by 2015 – an issue that has been a focus for her since completing a graduate school thesis on the topic.

 

 

YoungMama-JessGonzalesRojas (1)

Jessica González-Rojas is the Executive Director at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, the only national reproductive justice organization that specifically works to advance reproductive health and rights for Latinas. Jessica is an Adjunct Professor of Latino and Latin American Studies at the City University of New York’s City College and has taught courses on reproductive rights, gender and sexuality.

 

 

 

A2_bill-profile-200x300Bill Albert is the Chief Program Officer of The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, a private, non-profit initiative organized in 1996 that focuses on preventing both teen pregnancy and unplanned pregnancy among single, young adults.  As Chief Program Officer, Mr. Albert is responsible for overall program planning and development, and for tracking program progress.

Your Thoughts on PBS’ “Latino Americans”

Latino USA social media producer Brenda Salinas steps away from Twitter and into the recording booth to talk to host Maria Hinojosa. They discuss how social media has reacted to the PBS series “Latino Americans.”

 

brenda headshot

Brenda Salinas is a regio-montana by birth, tejana by choice. Before coming on board as an associate producer with Latino USA, she was awarded the highly competitive Kroc Fellowship at NPR. She is currently Latino USA’s resident social media diva.

 

This Week’s Captions: Questions of Authority

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week’s Latino USA examines’ questions of authority: who abuses it? How do you get it? And how do you maintain it? We’ll hear the stories of veterans and law enforcement. We’ll hear from a New York councilman from community asserting its power, discuss authority in media with students, a professor, and Univision anchor Jorge Ramos. And we’ll hear from two authorities in acting, Eugenio Derbez and Rita Moreno.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Has Spanish-language Media Arrived?

Univision anchor Jorge Ramos talks about the situation of American Spanish-language media today. He discusses how President Obama skipped over Univision for a primetime interview on all major newscasts, the stories covered by Univision that are missed by English-language television news, and the future of bilingual news on the new Fusion network.

Photo courtesy JorgeRamos.com

A1_ramos headshot

Jorge Ramos has been the anchorman for Noticiero Univision since 1986. In addition Ramos also hosts “Al Punto”, Univision’s weekly public affairs program offering in- depth analysis of the week’s top-stories and exclusive interviews with newsmakers.

Among his many recognitions, he received the Maria Moors Cabot award from the University of Columbia and has won 8 Emmy awards for excellence in journalism (including the first one ever presented by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences to honor leaders of Spanish Language Television). He was honored in 2002 with the “Ruben Salazar” award by the National Council of La Raza for his positive portrayal of Latinos.

His most recent book is “A Country for All; An Immigrant Manifesto”.

 

News or Noise? – Authority

In this installment of our “News or Noise?” feature, Latino USA producer Daisy Rosario asks students and a journalism professor about whether certain news sources have more authority and legitimacy, and the role of ethnic media in telling the stories of communities of color.

The young journalists featured got their start in ethnic media and community reporting at the Mott Haven Herald and Hunts Point Express.

“News Or Noise?” is a regular segment where Latino USA explores issues around news literacy.

Photo courtesy Flickr

Click here to take the quiz!

Having trouble taking the quiz on your mobile device? Go to the quiz directly here.

A2_Angely MercadoAngely Mercado is a 21 year old Hunter College student who is currently studying Creative Writing and Journalism. She hopes to eventually become a freelance journalist and fiction writer, or a staff writer for the New York Times. Until then, she’ll continue to intern and enter as many writing contests as she possibly can. Apart from being a student and aspiring writer, Angely also randomly longboards and does photography. Those activities help the creative process.

A2_Fausto Giovanny PintoFausto Giovanny Pinto is a reporter from the Bronx who has written for a host of community newspapers in the Borough. He is currently a student at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. He has Interned with Newsday and is currently a stringer for the New York Times.

 

shaniceShanice Carr is a student journalist currently attending Hunter College to study English with a concentration in Linguistics and Rhetoric.

 

 

A3 MaiteMaite Junco has been an editor and reporter for over 20 years.
She spent 15 years at the New York Daily News in three different stints between 1995 and 2012. Maite was part of the team that led the paper’s award-winning coverage of the Blackout of 2003 and the Abner Louima police brutality case. She currently serves as editor of Voices of NY.

Maite has a B.A. in Journalism and Latin American Studies from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She also studied abroad in Paris, Buenos Aires and Salamanca, Spain. Born in San Juan to Cuban parents, Maite lives in East Harlem.

Big Screen Crossover: Eugenio Derbez

Conventional wisdom says that Spanish-language movies don’t do well in the United States. But Mexican actor Eugenio Derbez set his sights north of the border, and his movie “Instructions Not Included” had the biggest opening weekend a Spanish-language movie has ever had. He joins Latino USA to talk about his crossover project.

Photo courtesy Pantelion Films

B3Eugenio_headshot_wikicommonsEugenio Derbez is arguably the most popular Mexican comedic actor of his generation. Due to his incredible ability to transform himself into any character, and to his extensive career in television, film and theatre, Much of his popularity is due to his television programs Al Derecho y al Derbez, XH-DRBZ, Vecinos, La Alegría del Hogar and La Familia P. Luche, which have had many of the highest audience ratings.In recent years, his outstanding career and his enormous ability as an actor have paved his way into the American film industry, allowing him to work alongside renowned actors such as Adam Sandler, Katie Holmes and Al Pacino, among others.

“Instructions Not Included” is his cinematic directorial debut.

 

 

 

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