Archive for the ‘Media Issues’ Category

Your Thoughts on PBS’ “Latino Americans”

Latino USA social media producer Brenda Salinas steps away from Twitter and into the recording booth to talk to host Maria Hinojosa. They discuss how social media has reacted to the PBS series “Latino Americans.”

 

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Brenda Salinas is a regio-montana by birth, tejana by choice. Before coming on board as an associate producer with Latino USA, she was awarded the highly competitive Kroc Fellowship at NPR. She is currently Latino USA’s resident social media diva.

 

Has Spanish-language Media Arrived?

Univision anchor Jorge Ramos talks about the situation of American Spanish-language media today. He discusses how President Obama skipped over Univision for a primetime interview on all major newscasts, the stories covered by Univision that are missed by English-language television news, and the future of bilingual news on the new Fusion network.

Photo courtesy JorgeRamos.com

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Jorge Ramos has been the anchorman for Noticiero Univision since 1986. In addition Ramos also hosts “Al Punto”, Univision’s weekly public affairs program offering in- depth analysis of the week’s top-stories and exclusive interviews with newsmakers.

Among his many recognitions, he received the Maria Moors Cabot award from the University of Columbia and has won 8 Emmy awards for excellence in journalism (including the first one ever presented by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences to honor leaders of Spanish Language Television). He was honored in 2002 with the “Ruben Salazar” award by the National Council of La Raza for his positive portrayal of Latinos.

His most recent book is “A Country for All; An Immigrant Manifesto”.

 

News or Noise? – Authority

In this installment of our “News or Noise?” feature, Latino USA producer Daisy Rosario asks students and a journalism professor about whether certain news sources have more authority and legitimacy, and the role of ethnic media in telling the stories of communities of color.

The young journalists featured got their start in ethnic media and community reporting at the Mott Haven Herald and Hunts Point Express.

“News Or Noise?” is a regular segment where Latino USA explores issues around news literacy.

Photo courtesy Flickr

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A2_Angely MercadoAngely Mercado is a 21 year old Hunter College student who is currently studying Creative Writing and Journalism. She hopes to eventually become a freelance journalist and fiction writer, or a staff writer for the New York Times. Until then, she’ll continue to intern and enter as many writing contests as she possibly can. Apart from being a student and aspiring writer, Angely also randomly longboards and does photography. Those activities help the creative process.

A2_Fausto Giovanny PintoFausto Giovanny Pinto is a reporter from the Bronx who has written for a host of community newspapers in the Borough. He is currently a student at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. He has Interned with Newsday and is currently a stringer for the New York Times.

 

shaniceShanice Carr is a student journalist currently attending Hunter College to study English with a concentration in Linguistics and Rhetoric.

 

 

A3 MaiteMaite Junco has been an editor and reporter for over 20 years.
She spent 15 years at the New York Daily News in three different stints between 1995 and 2012. Maite was part of the team that led the paper’s award-winning coverage of the Blackout of 2003 and the Abner Louima police brutality case. She currently serves as editor of Voices of NY.

Maite has a B.A. in Journalism and Latin American Studies from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She also studied abroad in Paris, Buenos Aires and Salamanca, Spain. Born in San Juan to Cuban parents, Maite lives in East Harlem.

Big Screen Crossover: Eugenio Derbez

Conventional wisdom says that Spanish-language movies don’t do well in the United States. But Mexican actor Eugenio Derbez set his sights north of the border, and his movie “Instructions Not Included” had the biggest opening weekend a Spanish-language movie has ever had. He joins Latino USA to talk about his crossover project.

Photo courtesy Pantelion Films

B3Eugenio_headshot_wikicommonsEugenio Derbez is arguably the most popular Mexican comedic actor of his generation. Due to his incredible ability to transform himself into any character, and to his extensive career in television, film and theatre, Much of his popularity is due to his television programs Al Derecho y al Derbez, XH-DRBZ, Vecinos, La Alegría del Hogar and La Familia P. Luche, which have had many of the highest audience ratings.In recent years, his outstanding career and his enormous ability as an actor have paved his way into the American film industry, allowing him to work alongside renowned actors such as Adam Sandler, Katie Holmes and Al Pacino, among others.

“Instructions Not Included” is his cinematic directorial debut.

 

 

 

News or Noise: Bias

In the latest installment of our news literacy series News or Noise, senior producer Carolina Gonzalez talks with journalism students Hanna Guerrero and Laura Rodriguez about what we mean when we discuss bias in the news media.

Image courtesy of MSNBC

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Special thanks to our collaborators on our “News or Noise?” segment:
Radio Camp at Union Docs
The Pasos al Futuro Workshop at DePaul University 


head_shot_lasloHanna Guerrero is a journalism student at DePaul University. She is a summer intern at Latino USA.

 

 

 

Laura Rodriguez was born and raised in Guanajuato, Mexico and came to the United States at the age of 9. She is currently a 4th year student at DePaul University pursuing a degree in broadcast journalism, a minor in Latino Media and in the Spanish Language.

News or Noise? The Intern Edition

Interns are challenging their unpaid status in court. In recent one federal case, courts ruled in their favor, saying they should have been paid for their work. Maria Hinojosa discusses the case and its coverage with journalist and media critic Farai Chidey and Latino USA summer intern Hanna Guerrero.

Image courtesy of

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head_shot_lasloFarai Chideya has combined media, technology, and socio-political analysis during her 20-year career as an award-winning author and journalist. She is a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute

 

head_shot_lasloHanna Guerrero is a journalism student at DePaul University. She is a summer intern at Latino USA.

“News or Noise?” The Media’s Choice

For this week’s “News or Noise?” we look at media coverage on labor provisions in the Senate immigration reform bill. Why so much media buzz around visas for high tech workers in comparison to the coverage on the farmworker deal? María Hinojosa speaks with Ted Hesson, immigration editor at Fusion.

Photo courtesy of FWD.us.

 

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Hesson-headshotTed Hesson is the immigration editor for Fusion, a joint venture of ABC News and Univision. Before joining the team in 2012, he served as online editor for Long Island Wins, a non-profit organization focusing on local and national immigration issues. Ted has written for a variety of magazines, newspapers, and online publications, including The Journal News, Time Out New York, and the Philadelphia City Paper. He earned his master’s degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and his bachelor’s degree at Boston College. He resides in Washington, D.C.

DIA DE LOS TRADEMARKS, “NEWS OR NOISE?”

When Disney tried to trademark “Dia de los Muertos” for their new movie merchandise inspired by the Mexican holiday, Latinos went online and turned things back around. For this week’s “News or Noise?” Latino USA guest host Luis Antonio Perez speaks with Kety Esquivel, digital media strategist and Vice President for Fenton, about how Latinos online retaliated against the entertainment giant.

Illustration by Lalo Alcaraz; Image courtesy of Pocho.Com, where you can see the whole illustration. 

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KetyKety Esquivel leads the digital practice for Fenton’s Western region with nearly 20 years of experience in the private and public sectors. Her commentaries has been featured in stories on the Wall St. Journal, HITN, PBS, CNN, Televisa and Univision. She also served as the New Media Manager for the National Council of La Raza and the interim CEO for Latinos in Social Media.

Lalo_hs-150x150Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border. He is married to a hard-working public school teacher and they have three extremely artistic children.

LeafferMarshall Leaffer is a copyright-law expert and professor at Indiana University’s Maurer School of Law.

 

The Boston Marathon Bombing, “News or Noise?”

For this week’s “News or Noise?” –where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation— we discuss the media’s coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing. To separate the news from the noise, María Hinojosa speaks with Dan Kennedy, journalism professor at Northeastern University in Boston.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of flickr (abustaca).

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News or Noise logo final option 2-01“News or Noise?” is a dynamic multiplatform radio project produced by Latino USA to encourage listeners to think critically about the news. Supported by Chicago’s Robert R. McCormick Foundation as part of its “Why News Matters” initiative, this year-long series of radio reports will explore top stories in the news cycle around which there is extensive commentary, misinformation, confusion or misunderstanding. The companion “News or Noise?” online quiz, (schedule here), will ask listeners to put their critical reasoning skills to the test as they discern fact from fabrication about each news topic.

Kennedy headshotDan Kennedy teaches journalism at Northeastern University in Boston. He is a regular panelist on “Beat the Press,” a weekly media roundtable on WGBH-TV. He is also a regular contributor on media and politics for the Huffington Post, and has written for the Guardian, Nieman Reports, the Nieman Journalism Lab, Slate, the Boston Globe, and CommonWealth Magazine. In 2001, he received the National Press Club’s Arthur Rowse Award for Press Criticism. He is the author of “Little People: Learning to See the World Through My Daughter’s Eyes”. His blog, Media Nation, tracks issues related to journalism, politics and culture.

“News or Noise?”: Illegal Immigrant

The Associated Press announced it will stop using the term “illegal immigrant.” For our “News or Noise?” segment –where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation— Latino USA host María Hinojosa talks to the Poynter Institute’s Kenny Irby about why this matters.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of Cuentame.

Check out the post on the AP blog, “Illegal immigrant no more.”

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News or Noise logo final option 2-01“News or Noise?” is a dynamic multiplatform radio project produced by Latino USA to encourage listeners to think critically about the news. Supported by Chicago’s Robert R. McCormick Foundation as part of its “Why News Matters” initiative, this year-long series of radio reports will explore top stories in the news cycle around which there is extensive commentary, misinformation, confusion or misunderstanding. The companion “News or Noise?” online quiz, (schedule here), will ask listeners to put their critical reasoning skills to the test as they discern fact from fabrication about each news topic.

Kenny Irby.photoKenny Irby is Poynter’s senior faculty and director of community relations. He’s also the director of the Write Field initiative, a dynamic new academic enrichment and mentoring program for middle school minority male youth. Irby founded Poynter’s photojournalism program in 1995.

NOTICIANDO: BLOGGEANDO

How has the Latino blogosphere changed as more people tweet and use tumblr and as big companies use new media to reach out to Latinos? Host Maria Hinojosa speaks to Maegan Ortiz, the publisher of Vivir Latino, about the changes for Latinos in new media.


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Maegan Ortiz is a Los Angeles based Nuyorican mami media maker. She has written for the American Prospect, the Progressive, Univision, El Diario la Prensa, and Latina on Latino politics, media, and culture. She is the Publisher of VivirLatino and can be found on twitter @mamitamala.

LOOKING TOWARDS “WASHINGTON HEIGHTS”

Washington Heights,” a new reality show featuring a group of young Latino friends who live in the New York City, is scheduled to premiere on January 9, 2012.  This week, we invited listeners to tweet out their thoughts on the show.

For next week, we’ve invited a few of our friends from the Washington Heights neighborhood to watch the first two episodes and share their reaction.

If you watch the premiere, let us know what you think.

50 YEARS OF SABADO

The TV show Sabado Gigante has been a staple of Spanish-speaking households for 50 years. Larger-than-life host Don Francisco talks with host Maria Hinojosa about his first TV experience, his recipe for success, and transcontinental commuting.


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Mario Kreutzberger, better known as “Don Francisco,” is the creator and host of “Sábado Gigante” (Giant Saturday), the longest running variety show in television history –celebrating its 50th anniversary this year– and one of the most successful programs ever aired on Spanish-language TV. Born in Chile, the son of German Jewish immigrants who escaped their country during the turbulent times preceding World War II, Kreutzberger is a distinguished TV presenter and producer, entrepreneur, composer and author who has been involved in virtually every aspect of the entertainment industry for five decades. His fascination with television dates back to the early 1960s, when he pursued an opportunity to work in Chile’s fledgling broadcasting industry. His debut program, titled “Show Dominical” (Sunday Show), aired with limited success and was cancelled twice. On the third attempt, Kreutzberger added a number of new elements, called it “Sábado Gigante,” and began hosting it under the stage name “Don Francisco.” And so, on August 8, 1962, he launched the show that would make television history.

 

NOTICIANDO: MEXICAN MEDIA

Silencing the Mexican media has become a key strategy for organized crime in the ongoing drug war. And it remains so after the killing of 55 journalists and a total of 60,000 people across the country. We speak to Ana Arana, director of the MEPI Foundation in Mexico City and co-author of a new report that highlights the devastating effect of the drug war on the Mexican media.


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Ana Arana is an U.S. investigative journalist and director of the Fundacion MEPI, an independent journalism project based at the Tecnologico de Monterry in Mexico City. MEPI promotes binational and regional investigations. Arana is a former Knight International Journalism Fellow in Mexico, where she trained investigative units at various news outlets. One of the investigative teams at the daily El Universal won Mexico’s National Press Award in 2008.

Arana´s work has appeared in Foreign Affairs, Newsweek, Salon., The Columbia Journalism Review, the New York Daily News, Business Week, and the Village Voice. The Miami Herald, CBS News. She is a former reporter for the San Jose Mercury News and was a foreign correspondent for The Miami Herald in Central America and Colombia in the 1980s and 1990s. She is a graduate of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and San Francisco State University.

LIKE A ROLLING STONE

The music and pop culture magazine Rolling Stone recently put out their first bilingual section, claiming to have a list of the top 10 Latino rock albums of all time. But their Mexico bureau emphatically disagreed—and wrote a letter disassociating themselves from the list. We speak to Benjamín Salcedo Villareal from Rolling Stone Mexico about this decision.


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Benjamin Salcedo Villareal is the Director of Rolling Stone, Mexico.

 

 

 

TEN GREAT LATIN ROCK RECORDS ROLLING STONE MISSED (OK, FINE, 11)

While we agreed with some of the choices presented in the magazine’s “10 Greatest Latin Rock Albums of all Time,” we believe trying to cover a music genre with a history in Latin America almost as long as what it has in the U.S. and Britain is a thankless task. In the spirit of inclusiveness, we wanted to highlight 10 albums (albums! Remember those?) we feel are key to understanding how rock has developed in Latin America. Sorry, U.S.-based bands, you’ll have to wait for your own list.

In chronological order:

1) La Revolución de Emiliano Zapata, La Revolución de Emiliano Zapata (1971) Rock developed in Mexico in tandem with its development in the U.S. This Guadalajara-based band often sang in English and was in many ways indistinguishable from its counterparts in El Norte.

2) Pescado Rabioso, Artaud (1973) Argentine icon Luis Alberto Spinetta’s dedication to French poet and actor Antonin Artaud. It opens with one of his most famous songs “Todas las hojas son del viento,” and it includes numerous acoustic guitars and jazz variations, an abrupt turn from their previous album, Invisible.

3) Sui Generis, Confesiones de Invierno (1973) One of the most influential rock bands to come out of Argentina during the early 70s. This album was their second and a dramatic improvement in sound and compositions while staying loyal to their Folk Rock style.

4) Os Paralamas do Suceso, O Passo do Lui (1984) This Brazilian band’s pop rock with tinges of reggae also became popular in Spanish-speaking Latin America, thanks to easy sing-along love songs like “Meu Error.”

5) Caifanes, Caifanes (1988) Musically, this debut record by Mexican rock giants may have leaned heavily on the Cure, but Saul Hernandez’s mystical lyrics brought a decidedly Mexican flavor. Their cover of “La negra Tomasa” alone showed that you COULD make rock that was purely Latin American.

6) Mano Negra, Puta’s Fever (1989) This was the record that created the Mano Negra effect, spawning a thousand Latin American bands that promiscuously mixed different genres and languages.

7) Los Prisioneros, Corazones (1990) The heavy use of synth may sound dated now, but this Chilean band pioneered lyrics highlighting their South American identity (“Tren al Sur”).

8) Sepultura, Chaos A.D (1993) Metal knows no borders, as shown by this band from Belo Horizonte, Brazil. This album moved away a bit from a strictly thrash sound to experiment more with punk and with deeper grooves.

9) Los Tres, La Espada y la Pared (1995) This Chilean band cross-bred 1950s roots rock with Southern Cone folk (one of the band members belongs to the famed Parra family) and produced a sound that was fresh even as bands all over the continent were experimenting with folk and rock.

10) Shakira, Pies Descalzos (1996) She’s all blonde and all pop now, but once this Lebanese-Colombian singer-songwriter was feisty and fully rockera.

11) Gustavo Cerati, Bocanada (1999) Soda Stereo may have been the pinnacle of Latin American rock, but even after the band’s demise in 1997, Cerati proved there was plenty more to do and say.

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