Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Media Issues’ Category

This Week’s Captions: DECISIONS, DECISIONS AT THE SUPREME COURT

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court decides on crucial cases for Latinos.

For “News or Noise?” we talk about unpaid internships and their effects on journalism. Then, visit a dual language program in Florida, the state where bilingual education began. Finally, ten years after the U.S Navy ceased its practice range bombings in Vieques, artists get together to raise money for a radio station that will help Viequenses cope with new challenges.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

News or Noise? The Intern Edition

Interns are challenging their unpaid status in court. In recent one federal case, courts ruled in their favor, saying they should have been paid for their work. Maria Hinojosa discusses the case and its coverage with journalist and media critic Farai Chidey and Latino USA summer intern Hanna Guerrero.

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head_shot_lasloFarai Chideya has combined media, technology, and socio-political analysis during her 20-year career as an award-winning author and journalist. She is a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute

 

head_shot_lasloHanna Guerrero is a journalism student at DePaul University. She is a summer intern at Latino USA.

This Week’s Captions: REPAINTING FARM LABOR… WITH BLUE

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we look at a Senate immigration proposal that could pave a quicker road to legalization, for farmworkers. And for “News or Noise?”… Why so much more media buzz on immigration deals for tech workers over farmworkers? Then, an ACLU lawsuit against the U.S. government for coercing immigrants to sign their own deportations. And we speak with Judy Reyes about the new Lifetime show Devious Maids. Finally, we talk to Destiny Galindo, a 17-year-old Arizonian who raps about democracy.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

“News or Noise?” The Media’s Choice

For this week’s “News or Noise?” we look at media coverage on labor provisions in the Senate immigration reform bill. Why so much media buzz around visas for high tech workers in comparison to the coverage on the farmworker deal? María Hinojosa speaks with Ted Hesson, immigration editor at Fusion.

Photo courtesy of FWD.us.

 

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Hesson-headshotTed Hesson is the immigration editor for Fusion, a joint venture of ABC News and Univision. Before joining the team in 2012, he served as online editor for Long Island Wins, a non-profit organization focusing on local and national immigration issues. Ted has written for a variety of magazines, newspapers, and online publications, including The Journal News, Time Out New York, and the Philadelphia City Paper. He earned his master’s degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and his bachelor’s degree at Boston College. He resides in Washington, D.C.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: CUTTING CHICAGO SCHOOLS

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, a look into elementary schools being shut down by Chicago officials, leaving many people angry and upset. And for this week’s “News Or Noise?”, Disney bows to Latino online mobilization after it tries to trademark “Dia de los Muertos.” Finally, we go to Tijuana, Mexico, where women roller derby fanatics give life to a fast growing sport.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

DIA DE LOS TRADEMARKS, “NEWS OR NOISE?”

When Disney tried to trademark “Dia de los Muertos” for their new movie merchandise inspired by the Mexican holiday, Latinos went online and turned things back around. For this week’s “News or Noise?” Latino USA guest host Luis Antonio Perez speaks with Kety Esquivel, digital media strategist and Vice President for Fenton, about how Latinos online retaliated against the entertainment giant.

Illustration by Lalo Alcaraz; Image courtesy of Pocho.Com, where you can see the whole illustration. 

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KetyKety Esquivel leads the digital practice for Fenton’s Western region with nearly 20 years of experience in the private and public sectors. Her commentaries has been featured in stories on the Wall St. Journal, HITN, PBS, CNN, Televisa and Univision. She also served as the New Media Manager for the National Council of La Raza and the interim CEO for Latinos in Social Media.

Lalo_hs-150x150Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border. He is married to a hard-working public school teacher and they have three extremely artistic children.

LeafferMarshall Leaffer is a copyright-law expert and professor at Indiana University’s Maurer School of Law.

 

The Boston Marathon Bombing, “News or Noise?”

For this week’s “News or Noise?” –where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation— we discuss the media’s coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing. To separate the news from the noise, María Hinojosa speaks with Dan Kennedy, journalism professor at Northeastern University in Boston.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of flickr (abustaca).

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News or Noise logo final option 2-01“News or Noise?” is a dynamic multiplatform radio project produced by Latino USA to encourage listeners to think critically about the news. Supported by Chicago’s Robert R. McCormick Foundation as part of its “Why News Matters” initiative, this year-long series of radio reports will explore top stories in the news cycle around which there is extensive commentary, misinformation, confusion or misunderstanding. The companion “News or Noise?” online quiz, (schedule here), will ask listeners to put their critical reasoning skills to the test as they discern fact from fabrication about each news topic.

Kennedy headshotDan Kennedy teaches journalism at Northeastern University in Boston. He is a regular panelist on “Beat the Press,” a weekly media roundtable on WGBH-TV. He is also a regular contributor on media and politics for the Huffington Post, and has written for the Guardian, Nieman Reports, the Nieman Journalism Lab, Slate, the Boston Globe, and CommonWealth Magazine. In 2001, he received the National Press Club’s Arthur Rowse Award for Press Criticism. He is the author of “Little People: Learning to See the World Through My Daughter’s Eyes”. His blog, Media Nation, tracks issues related to journalism, politics and culture.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: IMMIGRANTS AND SOLITARY CONFINEMENT

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we look into immigrants in solitary confinement. Is it necessary, and how is it being handled? Then, a group of fourth graders travel from California to Washington, DC, to demand that their classmate, Rodrigo Guzman, be allowed back into the United States. And, the Associated Press announced it will stop using the term “illegal immigrant.” So is this news or is it noise? Finally, we get a peek inside the tempestuous relationship between Mexican artists Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, in their own words.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

“News or Noise?”: Illegal Immigrant

The Associated Press announced it will stop using the term “illegal immigrant.” For our “News or Noise?” segment –where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation— Latino USA host María Hinojosa talks to the Poynter Institute’s Kenny Irby about why this matters.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of Cuentame.

Check out the post on the AP blog, “Illegal immigrant no more.”

Click here to take the quiz!

Having trouble taking the quiz on your mobile device? Go to the quiz directly here.

News or Noise logo final option 2-01“News or Noise?” is a dynamic multiplatform radio project produced by Latino USA to encourage listeners to think critically about the news. Supported by Chicago’s Robert R. McCormick Foundation as part of its “Why News Matters” initiative, this year-long series of radio reports will explore top stories in the news cycle around which there is extensive commentary, misinformation, confusion or misunderstanding. The companion “News or Noise?” online quiz, (schedule here), will ask listeners to put their critical reasoning skills to the test as they discern fact from fabrication about each news topic.

Kenny Irby.photoKenny Irby is Poynter’s senior faculty and director of community relations. He’s also the director of the Write Field initiative, a dynamic new academic enrichment and mentoring program for middle school minority male youth. Irby founded Poynter’s photojournalism program in 1995.

NOTICIANDO: BLOGGEANDO

How has the Latino blogosphere changed as more people tweet and use tumblr and as big companies use new media to reach out to Latinos? Host Maria Hinojosa speaks to Maegan Ortiz, the publisher of Vivir Latino, about the changes for Latinos in new media.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Maegan Ortiz is a Los Angeles based Nuyorican mami media maker. She has written for the American Prospect, the Progressive, Univision, El Diario la Prensa, and Latina on Latino politics, media, and culture. She is the Publisher of VivirLatino and can be found on twitter @mamitamala.

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