Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Media Issues’ Category

LOOKING TOWARDS “WASHINGTON HEIGHTS”

Washington Heights,” a new reality show featuring a group of young Latino friends who live in the New York City, is scheduled to premiere on January 9, 2012.  This week, we invited listeners to tweet out their thoughts on the show.

For next week, we’ve invited a few of our friends from the Washington Heights neighborhood to watch the first two episodes and share their reaction.

If you watch the premiere, let us know what you think.

50 YEARS OF SABADO

The TV show Sabado Gigante has been a staple of Spanish-speaking households for 50 years. Larger-than-life host Don Francisco talks with host Maria Hinojosa about his first TV experience, his recipe for success, and transcontinental commuting.


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Mario Kreutzberger, better known as “Don Francisco,” is the creator and host of “Sábado Gigante” (Giant Saturday), the longest running variety show in television history –celebrating its 50th anniversary this year– and one of the most successful programs ever aired on Spanish-language TV. Born in Chile, the son of German Jewish immigrants who escaped their country during the turbulent times preceding World War II, Kreutzberger is a distinguished TV presenter and producer, entrepreneur, composer and author who has been involved in virtually every aspect of the entertainment industry for five decades. His fascination with television dates back to the early 1960s, when he pursued an opportunity to work in Chile’s fledgling broadcasting industry. His debut program, titled “Show Dominical” (Sunday Show), aired with limited success and was cancelled twice. On the third attempt, Kreutzberger added a number of new elements, called it “Sábado Gigante,” and began hosting it under the stage name “Don Francisco.” And so, on August 8, 1962, he launched the show that would make television history.

 

NOTICIANDO: MEXICAN MEDIA

Silencing the Mexican media has become a key strategy for organized crime in the ongoing drug war. And it remains so after the killing of 55 journalists and a total of 60,000 people across the country. We speak to Ana Arana, director of the MEPI Foundation in Mexico City and co-author of a new report that highlights the devastating effect of the drug war on the Mexican media.


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Ana Arana is an U.S. investigative journalist and director of the Fundacion MEPI, an independent journalism project based at the Tecnologico de Monterry in Mexico City. MEPI promotes binational and regional investigations. Arana is a former Knight International Journalism Fellow in Mexico, where she trained investigative units at various news outlets. One of the investigative teams at the daily El Universal won Mexico’s National Press Award in 2008.

Arana´s work has appeared in Foreign Affairs, Newsweek, Salon., The Columbia Journalism Review, the New York Daily News, Business Week, and the Village Voice. The Miami Herald, CBS News. She is a former reporter for the San Jose Mercury News and was a foreign correspondent for The Miami Herald in Central America and Colombia in the 1980s and 1990s. She is a graduate of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and San Francisco State University.

LIKE A ROLLING STONE

The music and pop culture magazine Rolling Stone recently put out their first bilingual section, claiming to have a list of the top 10 Latino rock albums of all time. But their Mexico bureau emphatically disagreed—and wrote a letter disassociating themselves from the list. We speak to Benjamín Salcedo Villareal from Rolling Stone Mexico about this decision.


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Benjamin Salcedo Villareal is the Director of Rolling Stone, Mexico.

 

 

 

TEN GREAT LATIN ROCK RECORDS ROLLING STONE MISSED (OK, FINE, 11)

While we agreed with some of the choices presented in the magazine’s “10 Greatest Latin Rock Albums of all Time,” we believe trying to cover a music genre with a history in Latin America almost as long as what it has in the U.S. and Britain is a thankless task. In the spirit of inclusiveness, we wanted to highlight 10 albums (albums! Remember those?) we feel are key to understanding how rock has developed in Latin America. Sorry, U.S.-based bands, you’ll have to wait for your own list.

In chronological order:

1) La Revolución de Emiliano Zapata, La Revolución de Emiliano Zapata (1971) Rock developed in Mexico in tandem with its development in the U.S. This Guadalajara-based band often sang in English and was in many ways indistinguishable from its counterparts in El Norte.

2) Pescado Rabioso, Artaud (1973) Argentine icon Luis Alberto Spinetta’s dedication to French poet and actor Antonin Artaud. It opens with one of his most famous songs “Todas las hojas son del viento,” and it includes numerous acoustic guitars and jazz variations, an abrupt turn from their previous album, Invisible.

3) Sui Generis, Confesiones de Invierno (1973) One of the most influential rock bands to come out of Argentina during the early 70s. This album was their second and a dramatic improvement in sound and compositions while staying loyal to their Folk Rock style.

4) Os Paralamas do Suceso, O Passo do Lui (1984) This Brazilian band’s pop rock with tinges of reggae also became popular in Spanish-speaking Latin America, thanks to easy sing-along love songs like “Meu Error.”

5) Caifanes, Caifanes (1988) Musically, this debut record by Mexican rock giants may have leaned heavily on the Cure, but Saul Hernandez’s mystical lyrics brought a decidedly Mexican flavor. Their cover of “La negra Tomasa” alone showed that you COULD make rock that was purely Latin American.

6) Mano Negra, Puta’s Fever (1989) This was the record that created the Mano Negra effect, spawning a thousand Latin American bands that promiscuously mixed different genres and languages.

7) Los Prisioneros, Corazones (1990) The heavy use of synth may sound dated now, but this Chilean band pioneered lyrics highlighting their South American identity (“Tren al Sur”).

8) Sepultura, Chaos A.D (1993) Metal knows no borders, as shown by this band from Belo Horizonte, Brazil. This album moved away a bit from a strictly thrash sound to experiment more with punk and with deeper grooves.

9) Los Tres, La Espada y la Pared (1995) This Chilean band cross-bred 1950s roots rock with Southern Cone folk (one of the band members belongs to the famed Parra family) and produced a sound that was fresh even as bands all over the continent were experimenting with folk and rock.

10) Shakira, Pies Descalzos (1996) She’s all blonde and all pop now, but once this Lebanese-Colombian singer-songwriter was feisty and fully rockera.

11) Gustavo Cerati, Bocanada (1999) Soda Stereo may have been the pinnacle of Latin American rock, but even after the band’s demise in 1997, Cerati proved there was plenty more to do and say.

SOMOS: HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept. 15-Oct. 15, is supposed to be a time to celebrate Latino contributions to U.S. society and culture. But for some, it feels like a way to sanitize Latino history in the U.S. Or worse, just another excuse to market to Latinos. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Prof. Arlene Dávila and humorist Lalo Alcaraz about the uses and meanings of Hispanic Heritage Month.

This is part of our series on Latino identity, “Somos.”


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Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border. He is married to a hard-working public school teacher and they have three extremely artistic children.

 

Arlene Davila is a professor of Anthropology, Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. She is the author of Sponsored Identities: Cultural Politics in Puerto Rico and Latinos Inc: Marketing and the Making of a People, Barrio Dreams: Puerto Ricans, Latinos and the Neoliberal City. Her book, Latino Spin: Public Image and the Whitewashing of Race recently received the Latin American Studies Association prize for the best book in Latino studies.

Noticiando: Color TV

Latinos are a growing part of the TV watching audience, but they aren’t tuning in to shows on the networks. Is it the characters? The storylines? How Latino culture is represented on these shows? For insight on the challenge of capturing Latino viewers, we speak to Eric Deggans, television columnist at the Tampa Bay Times.

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Eric Deggans began covering music for the Tampa Bay Times in 1995. He started his role as a TV critic in 1997, focusing on the TV industry locally and nationally. In 2004, he joined the Times editorial board until returning to the critic’s corner as media writer in 2005, and as TV critic in 2006.

Somos: What’s In A Name?

Latino, Afro-Cuban, Chicano, Mexican-American:  For as long as people of Latin American descent have been a part of the U.S. they’ve been referred to by many names. What’s more, we even have different names for ourselves. In this segment of our new Somos series, we talk to writers and activists about what name they choose to identify themselves by – and why it matters.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of jeremystatton.com.

Explaining Somos

“Somos” is the name of a series that we are starting where we explore issues of Latino identity. We invite you to tell us how you identify yourself by making a video on youtube, posting a comment here, or leaving a message old-school style on our phone (yes, we have a phone attached to a wall!) at 646-571-1228. Don’t forget to tell us your name and where you’re calling us from. And after you post your video, tell us about it here or tweet us! We love hearing from you.

Marina Garcia-Vasquez is the co-founder and director of MexntheCity.com, a culture site and creative consultancy collective. The group aims to promote Mexican culture and heritage in a positive light through the accomplishments of Mexican nationals and Mexican-Americans both in the United States, Mexico, and globally. Based in New York City, Marina is a working journalist dedicated to writing about art, design, and architecture. She is a recent graduate of Columbia University’s School of Journalism M.A. program in Arts and Culture and a published poet.

Roland Roebuck is a recognized DC activist nationally known as a leading spokesperson on issues that impact Latino Afro-Descendants. He has worked tirelessly to champion human and civil rights. He is a founding member of several Washington DC community organizations and has compelled national organizations and elected officials to implement initiatives that address the needs of minority groups.

 

Matthew Yglesias is Slate’s business and economics correspondent and author of Slate’s Moneybox column. Before joining the magazine he worked for ThinkProgress, the Atlantic, TPM Media, and the American Prospect. His first book, Heads in the Sand, was published in 2008. His second, The Rent Is Too Damn High, was published in March.

NOTICIANDO: LATINO MEDIA MARKETS

The growth in the Latino population has media power houses fighting for a share of the highly coveted Latino market. To better understand how US media companies compete to capture Latino audiences, we revisit our conversation with Arlene Davila, a professor of Anthropology, Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Arlene Davila is a professor of Anthropology, Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. She is the author of Sponsored Identities: Cultural Politics in Puerto Rico and Latinos Inc: Marketing and the Making of a People, Barrio Dreams: Puerto Ricans, Latinos and the Neoliberal City. Her book, Latino Spin: Public Image and the Whitewashing of Race recently received the Latin American Studies Association prize for the best book in Latino studies.

2012 According to the Ancient Mayans

In just two days, the calendar will jump to the year 2012. And while some people plan their year festivities, others worry of doomsday scenarios and point at the Mayan calendar’s ancient prophecies on the end of the world. Independent Producer Maria Martin reports from Guatemala, the land of the Maya, to see what people are saying about 2012.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

The Evolving Occupy Wall Street

The “Occupy” movement has been steadily growing and has spread throughout the US and abroad. This week, we take a closer look at Latinos participating throughout the United States and the messages they want to convey. We start at Zuccotti Park with Marine Perez, who has been with the movement from the very beginning. She is an activist and translator, originally from Puerto Rico, and now, she is the language coordinator of the “Occupy Wall Street Journal.” We are also joined by activists: John Michael Torres from McAllen, TX, Marissa Martinez from LA, and Judith Marquez from Denver.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

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