Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Media Issues’ Category

Occupy Wall Street Round Table

It started as a small group of dedicated protesters – Occupy Wall Street was dismissed as a fringe movement. But their message is starting to grab attention with similar protests planned around the country. Demonstrators say they are the 99 percent, but do the protests reflect the diversity of America? Are voices of color also being heard?
To answer this question, Maria Hinojosa hosts a round table debate with Colorlines.com editor Kai Wright, artist Melanie Cervantes, and musician Martin Perna.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Manu Chao in Arizona

It’s rare to find a popular musician these days who embraces a controversial political message, but that’s precisely what Manu Chao has done in his career. Originally from France, but his music transcends borders. Manu Chao’s songs speak of poverty and world politics, often in multiple languages – and his stardom has brought attention to many issues around the world.
Most recently, the singer was in Arizona, standing in solidarity with protesters against the infamous Maricopa County Sheriff, Joe Arpaio. Maria Hinojosa speaks with filmmaker Alex Rivera who was in Arizona with Manu Chao, documenting the protest and impromptu concert.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

20 Years After the Mt. Pleasant Riots

Twenty years ago this week, the streets of Mount Pleasant, the most diverse neighborhood in Washington DC, were filled with rioters and tear gas. The city hadn’t seen a disturbance like this since the day Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated and there hasn’t been anything like it since.

On May 5, 1991, young men, mainly Latino, took to the streets to protest what was rumored to have been a case of police brutality. A rookie African-American female police officer had shot a 30-year-old Latino man.

Reporter Emily Friedman, takes us back to the three-day turmoil, and explains how the riots took the Latino community in D.C. to the path of recognition.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

A Deeper Conversation about Diversity in The Media

AOL’s acquisition of the Huffington Post for $315 million made headlines around the world and raised a lot of eyebrows among media makers. For loyal Huffington Post followers, there were concerns about maintaining the blog’s progressive point of view. For journalists of color, questions arose about how this merger will effect reporting about their communities — especially now that Arianna Huffington will oversee AOL’s Black Voices and AOL Latino and plans to include special “Latino” and “African American” sections to the Huffington Post. Many are asking, “Is this a step forward, or a step back?” Maria Hinojosa sits down with filmmaker and Columbia University Journalism Professor June Cross and columnist Ruben Navarrette to find the answer and discuss the reality of diversity in America media.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Examining Our Political Lexicon

When gunfire erupted outside a Tucson grocery store last Saturday morning, a remarkable national conversation began almost immediately—centering, in large part, around the question: Has our political rhetoric gone too far?

Jared Lee Loughner was taken into custody at the scene of the shooting. He is charged in federal court with one count of attempted assasination of a member of Congress, two counts of killing a federal employee, and two counts of attempting to kill a federal employee. It is expected that he’ll face state charges as well. Six people were killed during the rampage.

But even when the number of people killed and wounded was uncertain, there was talk of pulling back on the harsh language that has filled political discourse in recent years. Critics of this sort of language were quick to point to examples such as the graphic on Sarah Palin’s PAC’s Facebook page which showed gunsight targets over key swing districts before last year’s midterm election.

One of those districts was Arizona’s 8th, and the seat held by Representative Gabrielle Giffords, a Democrat.

Following the vote on healthcare reform last year, Giffords’ Tucson office was vandalized. She appeared on MSNBC to talk about political rhetoric, and addressed the Palin website graphic.

“When people do that,” the congresswoman said, “they’ve got to realize there are consequences to that action.” (see video)

Ms. Palin answered her critics mid-week: “Acts of monstrous criminality stand on their own. They begin and end with the criminals who commit them, not collectively with all the citizens of a state, not with those who listen to talk radio, not with maps of swing districts used by both sides of the aisle, not with law-abiding citizens who respectfully exercise their First Amendment rights at campaign rallies, not with those who proudly voted in the last election.” (read text)

President Obama traveled to Tucson Wednesday to speak to those wounded in the shooting, and to the families of those killed. He called on the nation to watch how we speak with one another: “…at a time when our discourse has become so sharply polarized -– at a time when we are far too eager to lay the blame for all that ails the world at the feet of those who happen to think differently than we do -– it’s important for us to pause for a moment and make sure that we’re talking with each other in a way that heals, not in a way that wounds.” (see video or read transcript)

On this week’s program, Maria Hinojosa talks about the current state of political rhetoric, and whether civil discourse is possible for Americans now, and about the shooting in Tucson in the context of the climate of hate Latinos are feeling there.

Our guests are Roberto Rodriguez, who teaches in the Department of Mexican American and Raza Studies at the University of Arizona, in Tucson; and Mercedes De Uriarte, who teaches in the School of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Latino Media Today

On this week’s program, we look at Latinos and the media: particularly, television. The Latino audience is a force to be reckoned with in the United States. Content produced for Latinos, both in Spanish and in English, is widespread–and hugely profitable. Recently, the Nielsen company reported that Univision is the most popular television network — that’s any network — for viewers 18-49 years old.

The programming on Univision runs the gamut from the serious, to the sensual, to the silly: Noticiero Univision, the network’s evening newscast, airs weeknights with anchor Jorge Ramos and María Elena Salinas. The network’s telenovelas include Soy tu dueña and Eva Luna, among many others. And no Saturday evening would be complete without an appearance by the master showman Don Francisco, longtime host of Sábado Gigante.

To examine the role that Latinos play in the media, and how the media has a role in communities throughout the United States and Latin America, we turn first to the University of Texas at Austin’s America Rodriguez.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.


Another perspective on Latinos and television comes from Flavio Morales at Mun2 [pronounced: mun-dos]. It is a hugely popular music and entertainment channel aimed at young Latinos. One of the most interesting things about the channel is that its hosts are continuously engaged in a complicated dance of code-switching, bouncing back and forth between English and Spanish within a single sentence. The rapid-fire Spanglish, and the channel’s tone and content, mirror the interests and behaviors of young Latinos.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

New Immigrant Media in Los Angeles

In California, one group is trying to bridge the divide between working-class Latinos and technology. The project, called “Voces Móviles” or “Voz Mob” lets Latinos tell their story through mobile devices. Reporter Marcos Najera has more.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

From Voter Turnout to Building Power Outside the Electoral System

The 2010 midterm elections are on Tuesday. This year’s races have been fiery, to say the least. PolitiFact.com, a website which rates the truthfulness of campaign ads, has awarded a record number of Barely True and False ratings to ads across the country. The rhetoric is hot and loud. This week, we’re exploring where things really stand for Latino voters, candidates, and activists.

Our guide to the numbers and the people behind them is Louis DeSipio, an expert in Latino Studies and Political Science at the University of California Irvine. DeSipio has extensively studied how and for whom Latinos vote, and he tells us how Latinos will effect Tuesday’s election and the elections in years to come.

Maria Hinojosa also spent time on the ground in East LA with a group called Innercity Struggle, who have spent this election season trying to register, educate, and motivate Latino voters.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Uncommon Guatemalan, Uncommon Muslim, Common Man

From the top of the World Trade Center towers you felt that you could see the curve of the earth. You knew that you were standing atop a building on an island in one of the world’s largest cities, but you were subtly aware that where you stood was less a point on a map than it was a spot on a globe: a big, curved, diverse world.

By the afternoon of September 11th, 2001 one could sense what felt like a change in the country: a widespread feeling of concern people expressed to one another. There was a palpable sense of caring, of reaching-out.

Much has been written in the nine years since — about the reaction by the White House, about the best way to memorialize those who lost their lives that day, about the efforts to clean up Ground Zero and the Pentagon, about America’s place in the world, and its sense of injury and the case for seeking justice.

Sometimes, perhaps often, in all this talk, there’s an “us-them” dichotomy that lies at the heart of the argument. Many Muslims in the U.S. feel that dichotomy acutely. It’s not uncommon on talk radio to hear people speaking out of a profound ignorance about Islam, about the Muslim experience in the U.S., and about the possibility for dialogue, coexistence, and peace in our own country, founded on a principle of religious liberty.

Watch video from C-SPAN of an interfaith gathering to promote religious tolerance and the cessation of anti-Muslim discrimination.

Religious leaders gathered in Washington this week to decry the plan of a Gainesville, Florida pastor to burn copies of the Qur’an on the anniversary of the attacks of 9/11. Politicians, military leaders, and other citizens joined in the condemnation. As we take time to memorialize those who were killed nine years ago, we do it as a nation distracted, conflicted, and seemingly ill-at-ease with the place Islam has in the American landscape.

Meet David Gonzalez

An uncommon Guatemalan, an uncommon Muslim, a perfectly common man.

David Gonzalez defies stereotypes and expectations. At a time when America is struggling to accept Islam, Gonzalez sticks out as someone who became a Muslim because he found it to be a religion of peace. Gonzalez is Guatemalan and was raised in a Roman Catholic household, as many in that country are. But he was unsatisfied by his spiritual experience and had questions that remained unanswered. His quest for answers led him to Islam, which he has embraced.

Recently, members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community gathered outside Washington DC for a conference. The Futuro Media Group’s Yasmeen Qureshi met David Gonzalez at the conference, and asked him to tell us his story of being Latino and Muslim.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Disaster Migrants & The BP Cleanup

The massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has drawn cleanup workers from near and far. Many of those workers are Latinos, so-called “disaster migrants” who go from catastrophe to catastrophe and aid in the repair efforts. Maybe it doesn’t seem like an ideal job to you, but these folks are happy just to have work.

The report on disaster migrants comes to us from Annie Correal of the Feet in Two Worlds project.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Click the image to view an interactive map of the spill.

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2014 Futurov Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

captcha

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027