Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

The Chicano Elvis

For almost 25 years, Robert Lopez has been putting on an Elvis suit and becoming El Vez, the Mexican Elvis. Performing as an Elvis “interpreter” started out as a dare when Lopez was an art gallery owner in Los Angeles, but the act has become a loopy tribute to The King and other rock icons, as well as tongue-in-cheek vehicle to reference Chicano culture and politics. It’s equal parts homage and satire.

Lopez describes his alter ego this way: “It’s like if Liberace taught Chicano Studies, if Viva Las Vegas became Viva la Raza.”

El Vez has done many themed shows, including “El Vez for Prez” in 2008. But his “Mex-Mas” show is one of the most popular, and he tours with it every year. “I put a mustache on white Christmas,” said Lopez, who tweaks the Irving Berlin classic song and sings, “I’m dreaming of a Brown Christmas.”

El Vez official site here. For 2013 Mex-Mas tour dates, go here.

 

 

Nadia Reiman has been a radio producer since 2005. Before joining the Latino USA team, Nadia produced for StoryCorps for almost five years. Her work there on 9/11 stories earned her a Peabody Award. She has also mixed audio for animations, one which won a DuPont award, hosted podcasts, and has guest hosted and produced for Afropop Worldwide on PRI. Nadia has also produced for None on Record editing and mixing stories of queer Africans, and worked on a Spanish language radio show called Epicentro based out of Washington DC. She graduated from Kenyon College with a double major in International Studies and Spanish Literature.

 

 

 

Photo courtesy of Randall-Michelson

Xmas Jollies Playlist

No holiday is complete with a good holiday playlist, so Maria Hinojosa talks with prominent music journalist Bill Adler about this year’s iteration of his annual Xmas Jollies Mix CD, a collection of rare, obscure, dug up Christmas tunes that he’s gathered over the years. Adler discusses his favorite Latin picks from the Jollies CD and shares his secret behind how he finds his music.

 

 

bill adlerBill Adler is a music journalist and a former Def Jam publicist. At Def Jam he worked with artists like Kurtis Blow, the Beastie Boys, Public Enemy, LL Cool J and De La Soul. As a journalist he has written for the Rolling Stone, People Magazine, High Times, The Boston Herald and The Village Voice.

 

 

 

This Week’s Captions: LOST & FOUND

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

On the first anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, Latino USA visits Staten Island, where the storm caused severe losses in immigrant communities. We’ll examine echoes of Sandy’s effects in Colorado’s recent floods, hear about people of Hatian descent who have lost their citizenship in the Dominican Republic, hear the tales of immigrants deported, saved from detention, and saving an indigenous Mexican language. Also: why radio is important, especially in emergencies, two musical oddysseys, and some words of wisdom from a Marine who recovers the long lost.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Brazilian Choro Music Makes A Comeback

An improvisational style of Brazilian music called choro makes a comeback in Washington, DC. Meet the band “DC Choro.” David Schulman reports.

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David Schulman at Storm King 2David Schulman‘s work as an audio producer includes serving as senior producer of BBC Americana 2009-2011, and creating and producing Musicians in their Own Words, a series of radio portraits that has twice been awarded national CPB grants. Featured performers include Poncho Sanchez, Yo-Yo Ma, and the late Bo Diddley. Close to 70 of David’s features have aired nationally on NPR, PRI and APM (Morning Edition, All Things Considered, The Story, Hearing Voices, and other programs). He was awarded the Best Documentary: Silver Award at the 2004 Third Coast International Audio Festival, and has been a guest artist at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Also an electric violinist and composer, David’s solo performances have been described as “spontaneous and completely unique” by Washington City Paper. He loves to create and perform music for modern dance, and also makes soundbeds for radio, podcasts, theater, and video. His debut album can be heard at quietlifemotel.com. More info at schulmancreative.com.

Jarana Beat Will Make You Dance

Reporter Willis Ryder Arnold introduces us to Jarana Beat, a New York fusion band that plays everything from a Spanish gypsy guitar to a donkey jawbone.

Photo courtesy of Jarana Beat

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C2_JaranaBeat_Willis_Headshot_CredWillis

Willis Ryder Arnold is a multimedia journalist specializing in radio reporting and photojournalism. He currently lives in Brooklyn. More of his work can be found at willisryderarnold.com.

This Week’s Captions: LIVE IN SACRAMENTO

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA is on the road and brings you this week’s show live from Sacramento. Host Maria Hinojosa interviews Californians about art and activism, writing and radio, and how the growth of California’s Latino population may indicate how the rest of the country adapts as Latinos become the largest minority.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Eddie Zazueta: Bay Area Rhymes

Nineteen-year-old Bay Area poet and rapper Eddie Zazueta writes about hip hop, street culture, and life in the Bay Area. He performed two original pieces for us at our live show in Sacramento.

Eddie opened with his song “Around the Sun,” where he speaks to the influence of hip-hop in his life:

And he closed with a performance of his poem “South Berkeley,” where he talks about life in the neighborhood where he grew up, and how it’s changing.

Photo courtesy of Youth Radio.

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Eddie Zazueta is a rapper and poet from Oakland, California. Eddie is a youth participant of Remix Your Life, a program of Youth Radio. Youth Radio is an Oakland-based media company that focuses on training youth in various forms of media production.

This Week’s Captions: LA LUCHA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This edition of Latino USA is all about “la lucha”-the fight or struggle-from the ongoing efforts of business leaders and activists to reform immigration policy to songwriter Robi Draco Rosa’s fight against cancer. Also: fights on cable news, one Spanish-language newspaper that’s fought for a hundred years for Latinos, a small town’s struggle for clean water, and words of wisdom from a Mexican wrestler.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Draco Rosa: Lucha y Vida

Maria Hinojosa talks to musician Robi Draco Rosa about his fight against cancer, his life as a former child performer, and his latest album “Vida,” which features performers like Ricky Martin and Shakira. The former Menudo heartthrob gives insight into his view on life’s struggles and how they are reflected in his art. He is now launching his first tour since his illness.

Photo courtesy Digital Girl Inc.

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Draco Rosa (born June 27, 1969), also known as Robi Draco Rosa and Robby Rosa, is a Puerto Rican Grammy Award winning musician, dancer, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer and actor. Born as Robert Edward Rosa Suárez on Long Island, New York and raised in Ponce, Puerto Rico, he originally garnered fame as a member of boy band Menudo in the 1980s. As co-writer and co-producer of many of Ricky Martin’s hits in English and in Spanish, he created the framework for the revolution in bilingual music careers that continue to dominate the charts to the present day. His latest album, Vida, is truly a celebration of life. He recorded it after he announced in 2011 that he had been diagnosed with cancer.

This Week’s Captions: Migration, Deportation, Intervention

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This episode of Latino USA examines government forces in our lives: first, the story of deportees who died in a California plane crash, whose identities were recently recovered. We’ll hear from the Mexico side of the border about the dangers faced by deportees. And, a Congressional proposal to end a US visa lottery. Also, how local governments are dealing with the federal “Secure Communities” program. And PBS’ Latino Americans documents the 500 year history of Latinos is the United States.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

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