Latino USA

Archive for the ‘News’ Category

An Explosion In Harlem

The building explosion in Spanish Harlem displaced dozens of residents, many of them undocumented. New York City officials are concerned they are afraid to seek help for fear of being turned in to immigration authorities. Latino USA went to the shelters to find out what it’s like for undocumented residents in emergency situations.

 

 

Photo by Justin Heiman/Getty Images

Michoacán 101: Inside The Civilian Militia Uprising

The crisis unfolding in the Mexican state of Michoacán is often stranger-than-fiction. Last year, a rag-tag group of avocado farmers and shopkeepers decided to raise arms against the brutal Knights Templars, a cult-like drug cartel who styles themselves after a medieval military order. In January, these civilian militias stepped up the pressure and began invading and occupying towns where the cartels operate one-at-a-time. A few weeks ago, the Mexican army stepped in and attempted to disarm the militias before things escalated further, but the militias refused to give up their weapons. Tensions have been high.

The militias are currently being led by a 55-year-old lime grower named Estanislao Beltrán, whose big white beard and short stature has earned him the nickname “Papa Smurf.” We reached Beltrán on the phone to hear why he decided to leave his farm and become a vigilante fighter. We also spoke with Mexican journalist Verónica Calderón, from the newspaper El País, to help us unpack the complex politics surrounding Michoacán.

 

veronica2Verónica Calderón is a Mexico City-based reporter for the Spanish newspaper El País. She was raised in Michoacán.

El Papa Argentino

The pope is TIME magazine’s man of the year–but can he deliver on institutional changes? He’s embraced the poor and snuck out of the Vatican to help homeless people. He’s openly embraced LGBT believers as well as atheists. And the election of the first pope from Latin America may be a symbolic shift in where the Catholic Church’s followers lie. NPR’s Cokie Roberts joined Maria Hinojosa to talk about how the media as well as everyday Catholics see him.

 

croberts-b59057da58d87058db947ad37115b0d9f3c8c429-s3-c85Cokie Roberts is a regular contributor to NPR’s Morning Edtion. At NPR she previously served as the congressional correspondent for more than 10 years. In addition to her work for NPR, Roberts is a political commentator for ABC News, providing analysis for all network news programming.

This Week’s Captions: LOST & FOUND

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

On the first anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, Latino USA visits Staten Island, where the storm caused severe losses in immigrant communities. We’ll examine echoes of Sandy’s effects in Colorado’s recent floods, hear about people of Hatian descent who have lost their citizenship in the Dominican Republic, hear the tales of immigrants deported, saved from detention, and saving an indigenous Mexican language. Also: why radio is important, especially in emergencies, two musical oddysseys, and some words of wisdom from a Marine who recovers the long lost.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

What Hurricane Sandy Left Behind

One year after Hurricane Sandy, many residents are still struggling to get back on their feet, particularly low-income and immigrant New Yorkers. Latino USA producer Diana Montaño goes to Staten Island, one of the hardest hit parts of the city, to check in with residents one year after Sandy.

Special thanks to Make the Road New York. To help or donate, visit their donation page.

Jonathan Wolfe contributed reporting to this story.

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Diana HeadshotDiana Montaño is a Mexico City-born, East Coast-raised radio producer. She has worked as an editor at the Phnom Penh Post in Cambodia and as an associate producer with Radio Bilingüe in California. Diana has also taught video production to immigrant and refugee youth in Oakland, and to young indigenous women in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. She is a graduate of the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

In addition to her work as a journalist, Lesley also has extensive experience in documentary filmmaking and writing. A seven-time Emmy Award nominee, she won an Emmy Award in 2009 for the documentary, “Green Prison Reform.” Lesley holds a bachelor’s degree in mass communications from Louisiana State University

 

The Immigrant Victims Of The Colorado Floods

Echoing the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, floods in Colorado have caused suffering and painful losses for Colorado’s immigrant population. Maria Hinojosa talks with Colorado Public Radio’s Lesley McClurg.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

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McClurgLesley McClurg is a reporter and producer for Colorado Public Radio’s daily interview program, “Colorado Matters.” She came to CPR after getting her start in public radio as a freelance reporter and producer for KUOW in Seattle, Washington. Prior to that, Lesley spent more than three years working in public television in Seattle, reporting on a variety of stories and producing long-form segments for KCTS 9 Public Television.

In addition to her work as a journalist, Lesley also has extensive experience in documentary filmmaking and writing. A seven-time Emmy Award nominee, she won an Emmy Award in 2009 for the documentary, “Green Prison Reform.” Lesley holds a bachelor’s degree in mass communications from Louisiana State University

 

Los Otros Dreamers

We meet some young, undocumented adults who’ve been deported back to Mexico. They call themselves “Los Otros Dreamers.” Brooke Binkowski reports.

Photo by Brooke Binkowski

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brookeBrooke Binkowski is an award-winning roving reporter currently based in San Diego. Her career has taken her from KFQD in Anchorage, Alaska, to CNN in Atlanta, to various radio stations in Los Angeles, and back home to San Diego (where she’s a graduate student at UCSD studying the U.S.-Mexico border.) Her curiosity has taken her all over the world. She is a voracious reader, writer, and traveler. Tweet @brooklynmarie.

This Week’s Captions: Questions of Authority

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week’s Latino USA examines’ questions of authority: who abuses it? How do you get it? And how do you maintain it? We’ll hear the stories of veterans and law enforcement. We’ll hear from a New York councilman from community asserting its power, discuss authority in media with students, a professor, and Univision anchor Jorge Ramos. And we’ll hear from two authorities in acting, Eugenio Derbez and Rita Moreno.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Has Spanish-language Media Arrived?

Univision anchor Jorge Ramos talks about the situation of American Spanish-language media today. He discusses how President Obama skipped over Univision for a primetime interview on all major newscasts, the stories covered by Univision that are missed by English-language television news, and the future of bilingual news on the new Fusion network.

Photo courtesy JorgeRamos.com

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Jorge Ramos has been the anchorman for Noticiero Univision since 1986. In addition Ramos also hosts “Al Punto”, Univision’s weekly public affairs program offering in- depth analysis of the week’s top-stories and exclusive interviews with newsmakers.

Among his many recognitions, he received the Maria Moors Cabot award from the University of Columbia and has won 8 Emmy awards for excellence in journalism (including the first one ever presented by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences to honor leaders of Spanish Language Television). He was honored in 2002 with the “Ruben Salazar” award by the National Council of La Raza for his positive portrayal of Latinos.

His most recent book is “A Country for All; An Immigrant Manifesto”.

 

Stop, Frisk and Seize

Imagine being pulled over in a “driving-while-brown” situation and then having your car seized by the police—without even being charged with a crime.  Maria Hinojosa discusses how this is happening across the country with The New Yorker magazine staff writer Sarah Stillman. Sarah wrote a feature article for the magazine titled “Taken” where she investigates this pattern of civil forfeitures.

Photo courtesy Flickr

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Sarah Stillman is a staff writer for The New Yorker and a visiting scholar at NYU’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute.  Her recent work has received the National Magazine Award, the Michael Kelly Award for the “fearless pursuit and expression of truth,” the Overseas Press Club’s Joe & Laurie Dine Award for International Human Rights Reporting, and the Hillman Prize for Magazine Journalism.

 

 

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