Latino USA

Archive for the ‘News’ Category

This Week’s Captions: ARCHIVES: RECOVERY EFFORTS

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

In this special archive episode, we hear about how Latinos recovered and helped their communities after two disasters—the September 11th terrorist attacks and Hurricane Katrina. Also, a report on the need for more Spanish-language coaches and reporters in Major League Baseball, and two Cubans in Miami plot a return home in an unusual vehicle.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: MAS JUKEBOX

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA brings the summer tunes, with interviews and music from tropicalia band Os Mutantes , global music guru Sergent Garcia, and more.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Bandoneon

We continue our series on the role of the accordion with a look at the bandoneon, the main instrument used in tango music, which is turning up in some unexpected places.

michellesheadshotMichelle Johnson is a multimedia journalist who lives in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. When she is not working, you are likely to find her out with the dog, talking to strangers and collecting stories.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: In the Air, On the Air

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we go to California to find out how agricultural workers are protecting themselves from deadly heat. Then, we learn about how residents of Albuquerque are measuring pollution in the air. We explore what we mean when we discuss bias in the news media. And we hear from immigrants to the US who don’t want to become citizens.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

News or Noise: Bias

In the latest installment of our news literacy series News or Noise, senior producer Carolina Gonzalez talks with journalism students Hanna Guerrero and Laura Rodriguez about what we mean when we discuss bias in the news media.

Image courtesy of MSNBC

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Special thanks to our collaborators on our “News or Noise?” segment:
Radio Camp at Union Docs
The Pasos al Futuro Workshop at DePaul University 


head_shot_lasloHanna Guerrero is a journalism student at DePaul University. She is a summer intern at Latino USA.

 

 

 

Laura Rodriguez was born and raised in Guanajuato, Mexico and came to the United States at the age of 9. She is currently a 4th year student at DePaul University pursuing a degree in broadcast journalism, a minor in Latino Media and in the Spanish Language.

This Week’s Captions: IMMIGRATION & DOMA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, Latino USA takes a look at the recent Supreme Court ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act and what it means for immigrant same-sex couples. Then, we explore the identity of people who are both Muslim and Latino. We’ll take a trip to Brazil to hear the accordion dance music known as forró. And Host Maria Hinojosa takes an Independence Day look at Lady Liberty’s immigration status.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Legalizing Love

On June 26th the US Supreme Court ruled the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional, paving the way for federal recognition of same-sex marriages and allowing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender immigrant couples to apply for the same immigration benefits as straight couples. Pablo Garcia Gamez and Santiago Ortiz, a married couple from Queens, New York, discuss how the DOMA ruling has already changed their lives. Then, Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Rachel Tiven, Executive Director of Immigration Equality, about the impact of the ruling.

Image courtesy of Immigration Equality/Judy G. Rolfe

 

To listen to more of Pablo and Santiago’s story, click HERE for the extended interview:

 

Santiago Ortiz and Pablo Garcia  Gamez
Santiago Ortiz and Pablo García Gamez have been together for 23 years. They married in Connecticut in 2011 and live in Elmhurst, Queens, New York. Santiago (left) was born in Manhattan’s Lower East Side to parents who migrated from Puerto Rico. Pablo (right) is a native of Venezuela, Caracas and has been living undocumented for over 20 years. He will now be able to apply for a green card as Santiago’s spouse. Once his immigration status is in order, he plans to begin teaching college Spanish.

Rachel Tiven is the Executive Director of Immigration Equality, a legal advocacy organization representing LGBTQ immigrants. Rachel received her law degree from Columbia Law School and her bachelor’s degree from Harvard.

 

REFORM MOVES TO SENATE

The Gang of Eight’s immigration plan cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee this month. The bill is expected to hit the floor in June for a vote. María Hinojosa speaks to Ted Hesson, immigration editor at Fusion, and Julia Preston, New York Times national immigration correspondent.

Among the amendments approved this month is one that limits the use of solitary confinement inside detention centers, an issue we’ve followed closely and reported on.
Click HERE for a list of amendments.

 

Image courtesy of Commons/wikimedia.org.

TanyaJulia Preston was a member of The New York Times staff that won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for reporting on internationalaffairs for its series that profiled the corrosive effects of drug corruption in Mexico. Ms. Preston came to The Times in July 1995 after working at the Washington Post for nine years as a foreign correspondent. She is a 1997 recipient of the Maria Moors Cabot Prize for distinguished coverage of Latin America and a 1994 winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanitarian Journalism.

Lisa CarterTed Hesson is the immigration editor for Fusion, a joint venture of ABC News and Univision. Before joining the team in 2012, he served as online editor for Long Island Wins, a non-profit organization focusing on local and national immigration issues. Ted has written for a variety of magazines, newspapers, and online publications, including The Journal News, Time Out New York, and the Philadelphia City Paper. He earned his master’s degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and his bachelor’s degree at Boston College. He resides in Washington, D.C.

 

 

 

 

 

A TASTE OF HELADO NEGRO

Ecuador-via-Florida musician Roberto Carlos Lange, aka Helado Negro, just released his latest record Invisible Life. Hear about his family life, musical philosophy, and meanings behind the new tunes in his own words.


Click here to download this week’s show. 

HeladoNegroHeadshot From the room he grew up in, in South Florida, to his apartment in Savannah, where that restless tropical silent partner, humidity, continued to creep in, and now in his current home in Brooklyn – Roberto Lange of Helado Negro has never not made music. Tones whittled out of these places, memories, time and all its impressions, Invisible Life is Helado Negro’s third full-length album. Like captured light, it is a reflection of Helado Negro’s refined love affair with synthesis, sampling, and his own strengthening voice.

This Week’s Captions: Latinos & Gun Control

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

How do Latinos feel about restrictions on gun control? Is now the time to restrict the right to bear arms? We hear two interesting perspectives on the relationship between Latinos and guns. And did you know that Latino farmers and ranchers sued the US Department of Agriculture and won? The USDA was not giving grants to Latino and African American farmers fairly. And now that the lawsuit is over, many ranchers are not signing up for compensation. Hear that (and Tex-Mex norteño!) on this week’s show.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

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