Archive for the ‘News’ Category

REFORM MOVES TO SENATE

The Gang of Eight’s immigration plan cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee this month. The bill is expected to hit the floor in June for a vote. María Hinojosa speaks to Ted Hesson, immigration editor at Fusion, and Julia Preston, New York Times national immigration correspondent.

Among the amendments approved this month is one that limits the use of solitary confinement inside detention centers, an issue we’ve followed closely and reported on.
Click HERE for a list of amendments.

 

Image courtesy of Commons/wikimedia.org.

TanyaJulia Preston was a member of The New York Times staff that won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for reporting on internationalaffairs for its series that profiled the corrosive effects of drug corruption in Mexico. Ms. Preston came to The Times in July 1995 after working at the Washington Post for nine years as a foreign correspondent. She is a 1997 recipient of the Maria Moors Cabot Prize for distinguished coverage of Latin America and a 1994 winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanitarian Journalism.

Lisa CarterTed Hesson is the immigration editor for Fusion, a joint venture of ABC News and Univision. Before joining the team in 2012, he served as online editor for Long Island Wins, a non-profit organization focusing on local and national immigration issues. Ted has written for a variety of magazines, newspapers, and online publications, including The Journal News, Time Out New York, and the Philadelphia City Paper. He earned his master’s degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and his bachelor’s degree at Boston College. He resides in Washington, D.C.

 

 

 

 

 

A TASTE OF HELADO NEGRO

Ecuador-via-Florida musician Roberto Carlos Lange, aka Helado Negro, just released his latest record Invisible Life. Hear about his family life, musical philosophy, and meanings behind the new tunes in his own words.


Click here to download this week’s show. 

HeladoNegroHeadshot From the room he grew up in, in South Florida, to his apartment in Savannah, where that restless tropical silent partner, humidity, continued to creep in, and now in his current home in Brooklyn – Roberto Lange of Helado Negro has never not made music. Tones whittled out of these places, memories, time and all its impressions, Invisible Life is Helado Negro’s third full-length album. Like captured light, it is a reflection of Helado Negro’s refined love affair with synthesis, sampling, and his own strengthening voice.

LATINOS AND GUNS

As the debate on gun control marches on, both supporters and critics of regulation have raised their voices. But where do Latinos stand on the right to bear arms? New York City attorney and independent columnist Raul Reyes and Assistant Professor of Politics and International Affairs Dr. Stephen Nuño bring you two different perspectives on the topic.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Flick (creative commons).

RaulReyes Raul A. Reyes is an attorney and columnist in New York City. A third-generation Mexican-American, he writes frequently on issues affecting the Latino community. Reyes is a member of the Board of Contributors of USA Today as well as a contributor to The TODAY Show, CNN, MSNBC, NBC Latino, Current TV, NPR, BBC World Service, and FOX News Radio. He is a graduate of Harvard University and Columbia School of Law.

StephenNuno Stephen A Nuño is an Assistant Professor studying Political Behavior, Race and Ethnic Politics, Latino Politics, Mobilization, and Partisanship at Northern Arizona University. He is also a Research Associate at the Leavey Center for the Study of Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University. He grew up on the outskirts of East L.A., in a multicultural neighborhood called Alhambra.

WHEN BORDER PATROL CROSSES THE LINE

A new report by the immigrant rights group Families for Freedom and the New York University School of Law Immigrant Rights Clinic found that Border Patrol agents were making unlawful arrests alongside the US-Canada border. We speak to co-author and New York University School of Law professor Nancy Morawetz about the report’s findings.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of The News House (creative commons).

Nancy Morawetz is a Professor of Clinical Law at New York University School of Law, where she co-directs the Immigrant Rights Clinic (IRC). Professor Morawetz supervises students in immigration court, federal district court, the courts of appeals and the Supreme Court. Professor Morawetz and her students also work on a range of projects assisting community based organizations. Professor Morawetz serves as the chair of the Supreme Court Immigration Law Working Group, which monitors cases working their way to the Court and participates in amicus briefing. Professor Morawetz’s writings include Counterbalancing Distorted Incentives in Supreme Court Pro Bono Practice: Recommendations for the New Supreme Court Pro Bono Bar and Public Interest Practice Communities, 86 N.Y.U. L. Rev. 131 (2011); Rethinking Drug Inadmissibility, 50 Wm. & Mary L. Rev. 163 (2008); Citizenship and the Courts, 2007 U. Chi. Legal F. 447 (2007); The Invisible Border: Restrictions on Short-Term Travel By Noncitizens, 21 Geo. Imm. L. J. 201 (2007); Determining the Retroactive Effect of Laws Altering the Consequences of Criminal Convictions, 30 Ford. Urb. L. J. 1743 (2003); Understanding the Impact of the 1996 Deportation Laws and the Limited Scope of Proposed Reforms, 113 Harv. L. Rev. 1936 (2000); and Rethinking Retroactive Deportation Laws and the Due Process Clause, 73 N.Y.U.L. Rev. 97 (1998).

FROM TIGRES TO TIGRILLOS: RAUL Y MEXIA

New brotherly duo Raul y Mexia debuted their first album, Arriba y Lejos. But the siblings are no strangers to the music scene. We speak to them about their new album and about growing up as the sons of Norteño giants Los Tigres del Norte.


Click here to download this week’s show.


Raul Hernandez and Hernan Hernandez Jr (Raul y Mexia) are musicians and the sons of Hernan Hernandez of Los Tigres del Norte. They first burst into the music scene with a video they made for Todos Somos Arizona in which they spoke out against Arizona’s SB 1070. Their first album, Arriba y Lejos just debuted on Nacional Records. Photo courtesy of Vivelo Hoy. More info here.

NOTICIANDO: NEWS TACO, THE GERALDO EDITION

While journalist Geraldo Rivera talks about a Senate run, Sen. Robert Menendez faces prostitution related allegations; and a new study looks at Mexican immigrants and their hesitation with U.S. citizenship. We speak to Victor Landa, editor of News Taco for a news round-up.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Victor Landa is the founder and editor of NewsTaco, a website that provides news, analysis and critique from a Latino perspective. He worked as a writer and editor for 30 years, mostly with Telemundo and Univisión. Landa also contributed to the San Antonio Express-News, and he is an adviser on media strategy, message crafting, storytelling and public speaking.

 

NOTICIANDO: DEADLY SOUTH TEXAS

With border enforcement front and center in both immigration reform proposals, security and migration issues are stepping into the limelight. The Washington Office on Latin America found that South Texas was different from other border regions. Senior Associate for Regional Security at WOLA Adam Isacson explains the findings—and reveals the sometimes deadly truths.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Adam Isacson is a key member of WOLA’s Regional Security Policy team. He is a leading expert on defense, civil-military relations, and U.S. security assistance to the Americas. He collaborates on Just the Facts—a constantly updated source of information and analysis of the United States’ often troubled relationship with Latin America’s militaries. He helped found Just the Facts in the early 1990s.

Mr. Isacson has co-authored dozens of publications, including “Ready, Aim, Foreign Policy” and “Waiting for Change,” which examine the increasing role of the military in U.S. foreign policy. He has testified before Congress on international drug policy, Colombia’s conflict, U.S. military aid programs and human rights, and has organized several congressional delegations to the region.

SONIA’S BELOVED WORLD

Maria Hinojosa talks to Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor who has written a memoir called “My Beloved World.” The book tells the story of Sotomayor’s childhood in the South Bronx and her years before the court.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Judge Sonia Sotomayor has lived the American dream. Born to a Puerto Rican family, she grew up in a public housing project in the South Bronx. Her judicial service began in October 1992 with her appointment to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York by President George H.W. Bush. President Clinton appointed Judge Sotomayor to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in 1998. She was the first Latina to serve on that court, and participated in over 3000 panel decisions, authoring roughly 400 published opinions.

Over a distinguished career that spans three decades, Judge Sotomayor has worked at almost every level of our judicial system, eventually becoming the first Hispanic, and only the third woman, to ever be appointed to the United States Supreme Court.

DOLORES, FROM THE HEART

We say farewell to Cuban-American writer, Dolores Prida. She died in New York on the eve of the presidential inauguration, just after attending a party celebrating 20 years of friendship and mutual support with Latina journalists, publicists and lawyers.

Click here to download this week’s show.

NOTICIANDO: ARKANSAS IMMIGRATION

A new study shows the economic impact of Arkansas’ booming immigrant population. Maria Hinojosa talks with Dr. Sherece West-Scantlebury, president and CEO of the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation, about the study’s findings.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Sherece Y. West-Scantlebury is president and CEO of the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation, a private, independent foundation whose mission is to improve the lives of all Arkansans in three interrelated areas: economic development; education; and economic, racial and social justice.

Involved in philanthropy for close to 20 years, Dr. West-Scantlebury served as CEO at the Foundation for Louisiana and as a program associate at the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Her professional career includes nearly 25 years of experience in community development, public policy and advocacy, and public service.

NOTICIANDO: BLOGGEANDO

How has the Latino blogosphere changed as more people tweet and use tumblr and as big companies use new media to reach out to Latinos? Host Maria Hinojosa speaks to Maegan Ortiz, the publisher of Vivir Latino, about the changes for Latinos in new media.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Maegan Ortiz is a Los Angeles based Nuyorican mami media maker. She has written for the American Prospect, the Progressive, Univision, El Diario la Prensa, and Latina on Latino politics, media, and culture. She is the Publisher of VivirLatino and can be found on twitter @mamitamala.

PRE-INAUGURATION CONVERSATION

President Barack Obama is about to begin his second term, and with the new administration comes a new cabinet and a new Congress. We speak about what Latino communities can expect in the new Obama term with Jordan Fabian, political editor for the English-language website for Univision News.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Jordan Fabian is the political editor for Univision News’s English-language portal. Prior to joining Univision in 2011, he worked as a staff writer at The Hill newspaper in Washington, DC where he covered Congress and the 2012 presidential campaign. Jordan has appeared on MSNBC, Fox News and C-SPAN, and has contributed to a number of nationally-syndicated radio programs. He also freelanced for Hispanic Business magazine. Jordan hails from Olney, MD and is a lifelong resident of the Washington area. He graduated from Cornell University with a bachelor of arts in history.

DOCUMENTED DRIVING

The Illinois legislature passed a law which will allow undocumented immigrants residing in the state to obtain driver’s licenses.  With this move, Illinois joins three other states — New Mexico, Washington and Utah that allow undocumented immigrants to drive legally. Dan Weissmann reports.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Dan Weissmann is a Chicago-based radio producer and multimedia reporter. His work has appeared regularly on WBEZ (Chicago Public Media, 91.5 FM) and can be found at www.danweissmann.com.

NOTICIANDO: ARE THE KIDS ALL RIGHT?

Mexican-American children are falling behind their white peers when it comes to language and cognitive skills, according to a new report by the University of California, Berkeley, and UCLA. We speak to Bruce Fuller, professor and sociologist at UC Berkeley and co-author of the study.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Bruce Fuller is a Professor of Education and Public Policy at University of California, Berkeley. Working inside policy organizations and the academy over the past three decades, he has asked how public action best strengthens families and schools. Trained in political sociology, Professor Fuller’s recent projects center on small-scale organizations that sprout across diverse communities, such as charter schools and preschools, which often spread in response to the clumsy or gray character of central states.

His recent book, Standardized Childhood: The Political and Cultural Struggle over Early Education, examines how elite reformers often push for state incorporation of community programs, even eroding the authority and resources spread across diverse ethnic leaders. A college dropout, he eventually received his Ph.D. from Stanford University. Before Berkeley, Professor Fuller was a research sociologist at the World Bank and taught at Harvard’s School of Education.

NOTICIANDO: WHEN FEDERAL LAW GOES LOCAL

An Illinois federal judge recently cleared the way for a lawsuit that challenges the U.S. government’s use of immigration detainers which instruct local police to hold suspects until being picked up by ICE, often indefinitely, and sometimes even U.S. citizens. Mark Fleming, an attorney with the Heartland Alliance, the Chicago-based group heading the lawsuit, tells us more.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Mark Fleming is the National Litigation Coordinator at Heartland Alliance’s National Immigrant Justice Center (NIJC) located in Chicago, Illinois. Mr. Fleming focuses on litigation and public policy related to immigration enforcement and detention. Prior to joining NIJC, Mr. Fleming was a staff attorney at the Inter-American Commission for Human Rights, where he monitored migrants’ rights in the western hemisphere. In that capacity, he coordinated the Inter-American Commission’s investigation into human rights concerns with U.S. immigration enforcement, detention, and due process.

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