Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Pfizer Helpful Answers’ Category

HEALTH HERO: CENTRO DE SALUD LA FE’S SALVADOR BALCORTA

A look at El Paso’s celebrated “Centro de Salud La Fe” and its executive director, Salvador Balcorta. This pioneering clinic was founded in the late 1960′s by a determined group of mothers and abuelitas in one of the country’s poorest neighborhoods. Balcorta, a child of the neighborhood, now leads the clinic. Reporter Monica Ortiz Uribe brings us this profile.


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Mónica Ortiz Uribe is a native of El Paso, Texas, where she recently worked as a freelance reporter. Her work has aired on NPR, Public Radio International and Radio Bilingue. Most of her stories examined the effects of drug-related violence across the border in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. Previously, she worked as a reporter for the Waco Tribune Herald in Waco, Texas. She graduated from the University of Texas at El Paso with a degree in history.

YERBAS BUENAS

A group in El Paso is now working with local health and educational institutions to start a school that will teach natural healing methods—using herbs, acupuncture and aromatherapy to cure illnesses. What’s more, they’re aiming for state accreditation. Monica Ortiz Uribe reports as part of our year-long series on Latinos and health.

This report was produced for Fronteras: the Changing America Desk. For more Fronteras coverage, go to fronterasdesk.org.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of flickr (creative commons).

Mónica Ortiz Uribe (Las Cruces), is a senior field correspondent with Fronteras and a native of El Paso, Texas, where she recently worked as a freelance reporter. Her work has aired on NPR, Public Radio International and Radio Bilingue. Most of her stories examined the effects of drug-related violence across the border in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. Previously, she worked as a reporter for the Waco Tribune Herald in Waco, Texas. She graduated from the University of Texas at El Paso with a degree in history.

The Psychology of Breast Cancer

Half of Latina breast cancer survivors suffer from depression. These rates are much higher than the average among other survivors. Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing-Giwa at City of Hope in Los Angeles shares her research on the psychological aspects of recovery for women of color with our host Maria Hinojosa. She discusses the role of spirituality, family and beliefs about women’s responsibilities in helping or hindering detection, treatment and recovery.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of World News, Inc. (Flickr/Creative Commons).

 

Dr. Kimlin Tam Ashing-Giwa is professor and director of the Center of Community Alliance for Research and Education at City of Hope.  She received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Colorado-Boulder.  She serves on the Executive council of Los Angeles American Cancer Society (ACS) and The Intercultural Council on Cancer (ICC).

The Genetics of Breast Cancer

Two genes, known as BRCA1 and BRCA2, can increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer as much as 80%. Researchers say the genes have been found in one in four Latina cancer patients under 40 years old in the U.S. Nova Safo reports on some new genetic research into breast cancer and Latinas that has links with Europe.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Nova Safo.

Nova Safo is a Los Angeles-based reporter who covers a wide variety of topics ranging from the Hollywood entertainment industry, to visual arts, culture, politics, policy, health, science, the future of energy, economics, and the occasional massive wildfire.
His reporting has been heard on NPR’s various newsmagazines and other public radio programs, and published online by Yahoo! News and others. He is the recipient of Hearst journalism awards for radio reporting, as well as an NLGJA/RTNDA award for excellence in online journalism.

Let’s Talk About Sex

Teens in the Bronx have higher rates of sexually transmitted illnesses and pregnancy than their counterparts in other zones but they’re using condoms more and having sex less. So why are the rates so high? As part of our series on Latinos and health, reporter Audrey Quinn visits the Bronx and talks to community health advocate Vincent Guilamo-Ramos about trying to improve teen sexual health in this borough.


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Audrey Quinn is a multimedia science journalist in Brooklyn, New York. She reports for a variety of public radio shows and multimedia outlets, blogs on health for CBS, produces podcasts and videos for The Mind Science Foundation, and co-directs Radio Cabaret NYC.

Latinos And The Obesity Epidemic

Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable deaths in the US after cigarette smoking. Latinos are especially hard hit, developing diabetes and other obesity related health problems at high rates. Reporter Nova Safo visits the predominantly Latino city of Santa Ana, California to see how biology, economics and environment all contribute to the problem.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Nova Safo is a Los Angeles-based reporter who covers a wide variety of topics ranging from the Hollywood entertainment industry, to visual arts, culture, politics, policy, health, science, the future of energy, economics, and the occasional massive wildfire.
His reporting has been heard on NPR’s various newsmagazines and other public radio programs, and published online by Yahoo! News and others. He is the recipient of Hearst journalism awards for radio reporting, as well as an NLGJA/RTNDA award for excellence in online journalism.

Does Fixing Food Deserts Help Fix Obesity?

A number of cities have taken up programs to put more fresh foods into corner stores to improve so-called “food deserts.” Nevin Cohen, an assistant professor at the New School in New York, shares his thoughts on whether having more fresh fruits and vegetables in low-income neighborhoods really affects obesity rates–or if the problem goes beyond access to certain foods.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Inhabitat New York City.

Nevin Cohen is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at The New School,where he teaches courses in urban food systems and environmental studies, including cross-disciplinary courses that connect the fields of policy, urban planning, design, and urban studies. Dr. Cohen’s current research focuses on the development of urban food policy. He has a PhD in Urban Planning from Rutgers University, a Masters in City and Regional Planning from Berkeley, and a BA from Cornell.

The Mighty Jícama

Performance artist Mero Cocinero Karimi has focused his work in the past few years around educating and empowering communities at risk for Type II diabetes. He shares part of a new performance piece, called “28 days of good energia,” drawn from stories and practices on food and health he’s collected around the country.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of All Googly.

Mero Cocinero Karimi is an Iranian-Guatemalan cook to revolutionaries & dreamers, and host of The Cooking Show con Karimi & Comrades, a live cooking performance for your heart, mind, stomach & funny bone. His role as an advocate for healthy communities through laughter & cooking has brought him to Alaska, Mexico, and everywhere in between. A frequent speaker on television shows & at universities, the Associated Press called his show ‘a globally flavored recipe that packs some punch lines.’ Mero is a proud graduate of the Paolo Freire Culinary Institute, and has cooked for such luminaries as DJ Peanut Butter Wolf, poets Tato Laviera, Jose Montoya, Yuri Kochiyama and Michele Serros, and hiphop superstar MF Doom. His latest episodes focus on cultural foods as a source of healing. For him ‘the revolution starts in the kitchen, one kitchen at a time.’

THE HEALTH PROMOTERS

In Brownsville, Texas, picking up the Latin American practice of using “promotoras” lets neighbors teach neighbors about the most common health issues. Part of our year-long series on “health heroes.”


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María Emilia Martin is a pioneering public radio journalist with more than two dozen awards for her work covering Latino issues and Latin America. She started her career at the first community public radio station owned and operated by Latinos in the U.S. Martin has developed ground-breaking programs and series for public radio, including NPR’s Latino USA, and Despues de las Guerras: Central America After the Wars. A recipient of Fulbright and Knight Fellowships, she has extensive experience in journalism and radio training, in the U.S., Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia and other countries. Sports Business Journal, among other publications.

America Bracho: the OC Health Genie

For America Bracho, health is more than just the absence of disease. She believes having parks, access to healthy foods and being civically involved are just as important. When she arrived in Santa Ana, California, over a decade ago, few services focused on children with diabetes, a growing problem in a city with many low-income Latino families. We feature Bracho, the founder and executive director of Latino Health Access, a center for health promotion and disease prevention, as one of our Health Heroes.

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America Bracho is the founder and executive director of Latino Health Access, a Santa Ana based organization dedicated to the health needs of Latinos in Orange County. A native of Venezuela, she worked helping fight several epidemics, and moved to the U.S. in 1986, where she helped fight HIV/AIDS. She also a consultant for the Pan-American Health Organization and is nationally recognized as an expert in Latino Health issues.

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