Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

Santiago Postcard

Reporter Alexandra Hall sends us an audio postcard from Santiago, Chile, on the fortieth anniversary of the U.S. backed coup against Salvador Allende.

Image courtesy of Flickr.

Alexandra HallAlexandra Hall is an independent radio producer currently based in Santiago. She holds an M.A. in Latin American Studies from Columbia and a B.A. in Spanish from UC Santa Cruz. Alexandra is an intern with Chile’s finest news station, Radio Cooperativa, and the Co-host of NACLA Radio. She is best known for going rogue to get the story- from New England to the Southern Cone.

 

 

Intervention

This past week, the Obama administration considered attacking Syria because of its use of chemical weapons. Maria Hinojosa discusses what this means for Latinos given past interventions in Latin America.

Photo courtesy Flickr

Robert Litwak is Vice President for Scholars and Director of International Security Studies at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and a Consultant to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Litwak served on the National Security Council staff as Director for Nonproliferation in the first Clinton administration.

 

Barack Obama (2006)

In 2006, Barack Obama was still a senator from Illinois, at a time when immigration reform was yet again on Congress’ agenda. Host Maria Hinojosa talked with him about his hopes for legislation, as well as deportation policy.

Image courtesy of Real Clear Politics

Bill Clinton (1993)

The death of Trayvon Martin and acquittal of George Zimmerman have prompted calls for a national discussion of race. But we’ve heard this before: in 1993, President Bill Clinton urged the same.

Image courtesy of Latino USA Archives

Fixing a system, piece by piece?

Both political parties agree: the immigration system is broken. But is that enough to get immigration reform bills through the House of Representatives? We hear from Congressmen Xavier Becerra and Raul Labrador.

Image courtesy of Flickr 

First elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1992, Xavier Becerra represents California’s 34th District and serves as Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus. He is a longstanding member of the powerful Ways and Means Committee and is the ranking member of the Subcommittee on Social Security.

 

 

Rep. Raúl Labrador’s political career began in 2006 when he was elected to the Idaho State Legislature representing western Ada County. In 2010, Raúl was elected to represent the people of the first congressional district of Idaho.

Asylum from Violence

After the kidnapping and beheading of the police chief in a Mexican border town, no one dared to replace him. But Marisol Valles Garcia, a twenty-year-old mother and student took the post as police chief in one of the most violent regions in the world. Today, she and her family are seeking political asylum in the U.S. Andres Caballero reports.

Image courtesy of Flickr


Andrés Caballero has been an active contributor to Latino USA for more than a year. He holds a M.S. in Journalism from the Columbia University School of Journalism, and a B.S. in Political Science from Notre Dame De Namur University. He covers issues that affect Latinos across the U.S., and he has also contributed to New America Media, the Hispanic Link News Service in Washington D.C., and El Tecolote in San Francisco.

Decisions, Decisions at the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court ruled its last batch of decisions on several cases that directly impact Latinos and other people of color. Among these, a decision that invalidates one of the most important provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Myrna Perez, Deputy Director at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University School of Law, talks about some of these cases.

Image courtesy of Flickr/SEIU

 

 

pabloMyrna Perez is a senior counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, a legal research and advocacy organization at New York University. She also works on a variety of voting rights related issues, including redistricting, voter registration list maintenance, and access to the ballot box. Before joining the center, Ms. Pérez was the Civil Rights Fellow at Relman & Dane, a civil rights law firm in Washington, D.C.

Congressional House Divided

Just after the last presidential election, prominent Republicans sent a clear message to support an immigration overhaul. But after months of debate, divisions among Republicans in Congress over a path to citizenship in the bill threaten the new pro-Latino rhetoric the party has worked so hard to promote. Matt Laslo reports from Washington.

Image courtesy of Flickr/Joe Goldberg.


head_shot_lasloMatt Laslo is a freelance reporter who has been covering Congress, the White House and the Supreme Court for more than five years. He has filed stories for more than 40 local NPR stations. His work has also appeared in The Atlantic, The Chattanooga Times Free Press, National Public Radio, The Omaha World-Herald, Pacifica Radio, Politics Magazine, and Washington Magazine.

Tackling the GOP’s Latino Problem

The Republican Party continues to struggle to recover the level of Latino support it enjoyed during the George W. Bush era. The $64 million question: can the Republicans do it, and how? María Hinojosa speaks with Pablo Pantoja, former Republican National Committee Hispanic outreach director in Florida, and George Antuna, co-founder of the Hispanic Republicans of Texas.

Photo courtesy of…

 

pabloPablo Pantoja has worked and volunteered in several roles with the Republican Party at the local, state, and national levels. Recently, he repudiated the culture of intolerance in the Republican Party through a public letter to his friends and took a stand by switching to the Democratic Party. Pantoja is a veteran of the Army National Guard and holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Spanish and a Master’s Degree in Political Science, Applied American Politics and Policy from Florida State University.

Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 1.21.40 PMGeorge Antuna Jr. is the co-founder of the Hispanic Republicans of Texas. He is a former candidate for the Texas House of Representatives and worked for U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison as Regional Director for San Antonio, South Central Texas and El Paso. Before entering public service, he was the Director of Protocol for then Texas Secretary of State, Henry Cuellar, and Policy Analyst of Workforce Development, Economic Development and International Relations for then Lt. Governor Rick Perry. Mr. Antuna was elected to the council of the City of Schertz in May, 2011. He currently works in the financial services industry.

 

Bienvenidos a Woodburn

The increase in Latino populations throughout many U.S. communities in the past two decades may be old news. But in states like Oregon, the change is very recent and very dramatic. Producer Dmae Roberts brings us a portrait of a town transformed in the Beaver state. Woodburn is now 60% Latino, the highest proportion in the state.

Image of the Quinteros at their Woodburn “taquería,” courtesy of Dmae Roberts.


DmaeDmae Roberts is a two-time Peabody award-winning radio artist and writer based in Portland, Oregon who has written and produced more than 500 audio art pieces and documentaries for NPR and PRI. She is a USA Rockefeller Fellow and received the Dr. Suzanne Award for Civil Rights and Social Justice from the Asian American Journalists Association for her Peabody-winning eight-hour Crossing East Asian American history series that ran on 230 stations. Her essay “Finding The Poetry” was published in John Biewen’s essay book Reality Radio (UNC Press).

Rhyming for Democracy

Destiny Galindo is a 17-year-old rapper who may not be able to vote, but believes in the power of the people all the same. The Arizona teenager was just awarded a $25,000 prize in the Looking@Democracy challenge sponsored by The MacArthur Foundation.

Image courtesy of Destiny Galindo, “American Vision”.

Tanya

Destiny Galindo is a 17-year-old Mexican-American rapper hailing from Phoenix, Arizona. She graduated high school this year, and was just awarded a $25,000 prize in the Looking@Democracy challenge sponsored by The MacArthur Foundation for her music video “American Vision”.

REFORM MOVES TO SENATE

The Gang of Eight’s immigration plan cleared the Senate Judiciary Committee this month. The bill is expected to hit the floor in June for a vote. María Hinojosa speaks to Ted Hesson, immigration editor at Fusion, and Julia Preston, New York Times national immigration correspondent.

Among the amendments approved this month is one that limits the use of solitary confinement inside detention centers, an issue we’ve followed closely and reported on.
Click HERE for a list of amendments.

 

Image courtesy of Commons/wikimedia.org.

TanyaJulia Preston was a member of The New York Times staff that won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for reporting on internationalaffairs for its series that profiled the corrosive effects of drug corruption in Mexico. Ms. Preston came to The Times in July 1995 after working at the Washington Post for nine years as a foreign correspondent. She is a 1997 recipient of the Maria Moors Cabot Prize for distinguished coverage of Latin America and a 1994 winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanitarian Journalism.

Lisa CarterTed Hesson is the immigration editor for Fusion, a joint venture of ABC News and Univision. Before joining the team in 2012, he served as online editor for Long Island Wins, a non-profit organization focusing on local and national immigration issues. Ted has written for a variety of magazines, newspapers, and online publications, including The Journal News, Time Out New York, and the Philadelphia City Paper. He earned his master’s degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and his bachelor’s degree at Boston College. He resides in Washington, D.C.

 

 

 

 

 

POSTVILLE FIVE YEARS LATER

Five years ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents closed in on a kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa and carried out the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with filmmaker Luis Argueta, director of “Abused: the Postville Raid,” a documentary about the raid’s impact on immigrant families and on the town.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image: Abused Documentary Facebook.

Luis Argueta (photo by Bea Gallardo)Luis Argueta is a film director and producer whose work spans features, documentaries, shorts and episodic TV. He has also worked as commercial director, lecturer and teacher in the United States, Europe and throughout the Americas.  Born and raised in Guatemala, Argueta is a US Citizen and has been a resident of New York since 1977. His film The Silence of Neto is the only Guatemalan film ever to have been submitted to the Academy Awards competition and he is the only Guatemalan director to have received a CLIO. In April 2009, the British newspaper The Guardian, listed Mr. Argueta as one of Guatemala’s National Living Icons, alongside Nobel Laureate Rigoberta Menchu and Singer/Songwriter Ricardo Arjona.

 

Where is Mexico on U.S Immigration Reform?

President Obama’s visit to Mexico came with immigration reform at the center stage in Washington. And with Mexican nationals making up more than half of all undocumented immigrants living in the U.S, where is Mexico in the discussion? María Hinojosa speaks with former Mexican Ambassador Arturo Sarukhan.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of flickr.

PhotoASArturo Sarukhan served as Mexico Ambassador to the United States from 2007 to 2013. He is currently the Chairman of Global Solutions, a Podesta Company, and a global strategic consulting and risk assessment firm. He served for 20 years in the Mexican Foreign Service, as Chief of Policy Planning at the Foreign Ministry, and he was appointed Mexican Consul-General to New York City. In 2006, he joined the Presidential Campaign of Felipe Calderón as Foreign Policy Advisor and International Spokesperson and was tapped to coordinate his foreign policy Transition Team.

The Enforcement Taboo

From rallies in the Capitol, to acts of protest near the Texas/Mexico border, to a federal court room in New York, immigration activists give a final push to ensure that Congress delivers the long awaited bill reforming immigration policy and enforcement. María Hinojosa speaks to Juan Cartagena, president and general counsel of Latino Justice PRLDEF based in New York City.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the Wilson Center’s Mexican Institute.

juanJuan Cartagena is the president and general counsel for LatinoJustice PRLDEF. He is a constitutional and civil rights attorney with experience in employment rights, language rights, voting rights, public education financing, environmental law, housing and access to public hospitals.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2015 Futuro Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

[bwp-recaptcha bwp-recaptcha-913]

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027