Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

Does Immigration Reform Still Have A Pulse?

Is immigration reform alive and well in Congress? Or is it walking dead? Host Maria Hinojosa talks with Bob Naerebout, executive director of the Idaho Dairymen’s Association, about the business and moral reasons he went to Washington to keep reform alive.

 Photo courtesy of Rob Crawley.

Bob-photoBob Naerebout is the executive director of the Idaho Dairymen’s Association.

Turning Art into Activism: Favianna Rodriguez

You have probably seen her posters at immigrant rights marches around the country, but never knew who the artist was behind the captivating images. Artist, activist, and California native Favianna Rodriguez joins the live show to discuss where the personal meets the intersection of art and activism, and how she sees her own artwork fitting into the fight for immigrant rights. She also talks about how California issues have had a larger impact nationwide.

Below are the images Favianna talks about during her interview:

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A1_faviannaFavianna Rodriguez is a transnational interdisciplinary artist and cultural organizer. Her art and collaborative projects deal with migration, global politics, economic injustice, patriarchy, and interdependence . Rodriguez lectures globally on the power of art, cultural organizing and technology to inspire social change, and leads art workshops at schools around the country. In addition to her fine arts and community work, Rodriguez partners with social movement groups around the world to create art that’s visionary, inspirational, radical and, most importantly, transformational. When Favianna is not making art, she is directing CultureStrike, a national arts organization that engages artists, writers and performers in migrant rights. In 2009, she co-founded Presente.org, a national online organizing network dedicated to the political empowerment of Latino communities.

About Culture/Strike:

CultureStrike began in the summer of 2010 as a petition to honor the boycott of Arizona after that state passed its anti-immigrant law SB 1070. CultureStrike, which includes Wordstrike and Artstrike, seeks to organize artists, writers and other creative workers to strike back against anti-immigrant laws and attitudes. Their work is premised on the belief that culture, as the realm of ideas, images, and stories, is where people make sense of the world, find meaning and forge solidarity.

California as a Crystal Ball

California is demographically ahead of the curve: its Latino population has outpaced that of the rest of the country. So how have the institutions and culture adapted? Maria Hinojosa asks Kimberly Nalder of the Project for an Informed Electorate and Belinda Reyes of the Cesar Chavez Institute, and takes a few audience questions.

Photo courtesy of freestock.ca.

B2_Kimberly NadlerKimberly Nalder is the director of the Project for an Informed Electorate and associate professor in the Department of Government at California State University Sacramento.

 

 

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Formerly a research fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California, Belinda Reyes is an authority on immigration policy and the social and economic progress of racial and ethnic groups in the United States and director of the Cesar Chavez Institute at San Francisco State University.

The Cost of Inaction, A Call To Action

While immigration reform is stalled in Congress, over 1,000 people are deported each day. This human cost of inaction from legislators has spurred immigrant advocates to up the ante on the fight for immigrant rights. Latino USA talks with organizers about why – and how- they continue to push for action.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Jonathan Wolfe contributed reporting to this story.

israelIsrael Rodrigues Rubio is one of 30 DREAMers –undocumented youth brought to the US as children – who crossed the border on September 30th, 2013 as an act of civil disobedience organized by the National Immigrant Youth Alliance. He grew up in Durham, Nort Carolina and is a graduate of Columbia University. Despite all his successes, Israel’s undocumented status limited him in pursuing his dreams. By 2011, being a couple of months away from graduation, Israel settled on leaving for Mexico. In Mexico City, Israel had trouble integrating into a society he barely knew and was surrounded by increasing violence and political instability. In 2013 He decided he wanted to return to his family in the US.

DavidLeopoldDavid Wolfe Leopold is the founder and principal of David Wolfe Leopold & Associates Co. LPA. Mr. Leopold is the past president of the Washington, D.C.-based American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA www.aila.org), the premier bar association of immigration lawyers and professors in the U.S. He has served as AILA’s top liaison to the Department of Homeland Security’s key enforcement bureaus and co-founded the American Immigration Council’s Litigation Institute, a hands-on continuing legal education program focused on federal immigration litigation.

Gabriela Flora1Gabriela Flora is the Regional Project Voice Organizer of the American Friends Service Committee, Colorado. The organization is part of the Colorado Immigrant Rights Coalition, which succeeded in its fight to repeal SB-90, Colorado’s copycat Arizona-style show-me-your-papers law in 2012. In 2013 the Coalition had another victory – the approval of a law allowing for undocumented immigrants to access drivers’ licenses.

Pablo AlvaradoPablo Alvarado is an immigrant worker from El Salvador. In 2002, Alvarado became the national coordinator of the newly created National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON), currently a collaboration of about three dozen community-based day laborer organizations. Under his guidance, NDLON works with local governments to help establish worker centers to move job seekers into places of safety.

 

 

 

 

News Or Noise: Talking Heads

In our ongoing feature on news literacy, we look at the talking heads who yell on television. A group of young journalists and media consumers teach us the best way to follow important news stories, and to see what’s behind all the screaming and yelling.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

 

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Having trouble taking the quiz on your mobile device? Go to the quiz directly here.

Elisha FieldstadtElisha Fieldstadt is a news junkie who thinks she’s incredibly fortunate to work in an industry she is so passionate about. She is editor-in-chief of Baruch’s Dollars & Sense magazine and an intern at NBCNews.com. She is also the creator of Veganthropology.wordpress.com and a contributing writer for BoomPopMedia.com. In her very little bit of spare time she does yoga, bikes, cooks, bakes and explores Manhattan, where she has lived for five years. You can follow her @el_fields.
Juan JaraJuan Jara is a senior in high school and the photographer for the North Star online newspaper. He hopes to be a film director someday and cannot wait to start his first feature film.

Anam BaigAnam Baig is the copy chief for The Ticker at Baruch College in New York City.

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Samantha Votzke is a high school student in Tampa, Florida.

Food Stamp Fight

This November 1st, Americans receiving food stamps will have a little less to eat. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, was expanded during the recession as part of the 2009 Stimulus Package. Food stamp enrollment in the US has doubled between 2007 and now, from 26 million to 48 million people. But on November 1st, this expansion is set to expire, and millions of Americans will see their benefits reduced. Meanwhile, Congress is considering further cuts to the program. Producer Diana Montaño talks to New Yorkers to see how these cuts will affect them.

Photo by Latino USA

 
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Diana HeadshotDiana Montaño is a Mexico City-born, East Coast-raised producer for Latino USA. Before coming on board, she worked as an editor at the Phnom Penh Post in Cambodia and as an associate producer with Radio Bilingüe in California. Diana has also taught video production to immigrant and refugee youth in Oakland, and to young indigenous women in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. She is a graduate of the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

Al & Lalo: Ted Cruzin’ Around

Comedian Al Madrigal and cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz discuss Senator Ted Cruz, drivers’ licenses for undocumented migrants, and more.

Photo courtesy of Patrick Feller

 

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MADRIGAL-300x168A correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” since 2011, Al Madrigal has been named Best Stand-Up Comedian by the HBO/U.S. Comedy Arts Festival and his material dubbed “dynamic” by The New York Times. His unique, spontaneous and fast-paced lyrical storytelling style has made him a regular on television with numerous appearances on Comedy Central including his own half-hour Comedy Central Presents Special.

Lalo_hs-150x150Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip,“La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border.

NYC Election Milestone

Latinos have made their power felt in the New York City mayor’s race in a way not seen before, with celebrities like John Leguizamo and Junot Diaz endorsing candidate Bill DeBlasio. And in Brooklyn, the first Mexican-American ever will be on the city council. Politician Carlos Menchaca visits the Latino USA studios and talks about being not only the first Mexican-American councilmember, but also the first openly gay legislator to represent Brooklyn.

Photo courtesy Carlos2013.com

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Carlos Menchaca is a product of public schools and public housing, He is a native of El Paso, Texas raised by a single mother who immigrated from Mexico,  In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Carlos worked day and night, bringing together local leaders, community groups, and everyday New Yorkers to coordinate response efforts and hold New York City, State, and Federal officials accountable.

As New York City Council member, Carlos will represent residents of the 38th Council District, which encompasses Sunset Park, Red Hook, Greenwood Heights, Borough Park, Windsor Terrace and Bay Ridge Towers.

 

 

Deported Vets

Serving in the military can help immigrants gain U.S. citizenship. But vets who commit crimes may find themselves deported despite their service to the country. Latino USA speaks with a vet awaiting deportation and with filmmaker John Valadez, currently working on a documentary highlighting the cases of veterans who have been deported.

Photo courtesy Flickr

C1deportedvets_headshot_JohnValadezJohn Valadez is an award-winning director who has been producing documentaries for PBS for the last X years. He has been a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow, A Rockefeller Fellow and is a founding member of the New York Chapter of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers. He has worked on projects for Carleton UK Television, Frontline, American Masters, CBC, TLC and HBO.

 

 

 

 

C1DeportedVets_headshot_CraigShaginCraig Shagin is a lawyer in private practice in Pennsylvania, where egis firm is active in immigration law. He is a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. He has authored numerous articles and books on various aspects of immigration law, including “Deporting Private Ryan: The Less Than Honorable Condition of the Non-Citizen in the United States Armed Forces.”

 

 

 

TRUST Around the Country

Local governments in California, New Orleans, and Connecticut are implementing laws known as “TRUST acts,” limiting the scope of cooperation between local law enforcement and the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. We’ll hear pieces from Adrian Florido in California, Kate Richardson in New Orleans, and Lucy Nalpathanchil in Connecticut. We’ll also hear from a Connecticut TRUST act booster, state senate majority leader Martin Looney.

Photo: Josemaria Islas at a rally in New Haven, CT. His detention and pending deportation spurred the Connecticut TRUST act. Image courtesy of Unidad Latina En Acción.


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Senator Looney is in his sixth term as Senate Majority Leader of the General Assembly, having first been elected to that leadership post in 2003. He is also Chair of the Executive and Legislative Nominations Committee and Vice Chair of the Legislative Management Committee. Since being elected to the State Senate in 1993 and prior to his election as Majority Leader, he served six years as Senate Chair of the Finance, Revenue and Bonding Committee; Chairman of the Banks Committee; and one term as Ranking Member of the Judiciary Committee.

RebeccaPlevin Adrian Florido is a reporter for the Fronteras Desk where he covers the U.S.-Mexico border, immigrant and tribal communities, demographics, and culture. Before joining KPBS, he was a staff writer at Voice of San Diego. There he reported on San Diego neighborhoods, focusing on immigrant and under-served communities as well as development, planning, land use, and transportation.

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Kate Richardson is from Houston, Texas. She is an independent radio producer and contributor to WWNO in New Orleans. She helps run a community media project called The Listening Post and teaches Spanish at Delgado Community College.

 

nalpathanchil by Chion Wolf

Lucy Nalpathanchil is WNPR’s All Things Considered Host and Correspondent. She’s an award-winning reporter who has worked in several states since starting her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. Lucy now lives in beautiful New England where she reports on news stories in the Connecticut region and contributes to National Public Radio.  While at WNPR, her stories have focused on immigration including New Haven’s controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the “Becoming American” series

 

Santiago Postcard

Reporter Alexandra Hall sends us an audio postcard from Santiago, Chile, on the fortieth anniversary of the U.S. backed coup against Salvador Allende.

Image courtesy of Flickr.

Alexandra HallAlexandra Hall is an independent radio producer currently based in Santiago. She holds an M.A. in Latin American Studies from Columbia and a B.A. in Spanish from UC Santa Cruz. Alexandra is an intern with Chile’s finest news station, Radio Cooperativa, and the Co-host of NACLA Radio. She is best known for going rogue to get the story- from New England to the Southern Cone.

 

 

Intervention

This past week, the Obama administration considered attacking Syria because of its use of chemical weapons. Maria Hinojosa discusses what this means for Latinos given past interventions in Latin America.

Photo courtesy Flickr

Robert Litwak is Vice President for Scholars and Director of International Security Studies at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and a Consultant to the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Dr. Litwak served on the National Security Council staff as Director for Nonproliferation in the first Clinton administration.

 

Barack Obama (2006)

In 2006, Barack Obama was still a senator from Illinois, at a time when immigration reform was yet again on Congress’ agenda. Host Maria Hinojosa talked with him about his hopes for legislation, as well as deportation policy.

Image courtesy of Real Clear Politics

Bill Clinton (1993)

The death of Trayvon Martin and acquittal of George Zimmerman have prompted calls for a national discussion of race. But we’ve heard this before: in 1993, President Bill Clinton urged the same.

Image courtesy of Latino USA Archives

Fixing a system, piece by piece?

Both political parties agree: the immigration system is broken. But is that enough to get immigration reform bills through the House of Representatives? We hear from Congressmen Xavier Becerra and Raul Labrador.

Image courtesy of Flickr 

First elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1992, Xavier Becerra represents California’s 34th District and serves as Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus. He is a longstanding member of the powerful Ways and Means Committee and is the ranking member of the Subcommittee on Social Security.

 

 

Rep. Raúl Labrador’s political career began in 2006 when he was elected to the Idaho State Legislature representing western Ada County. In 2010, Raúl was elected to represent the people of the first congressional district of Idaho.

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