Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

The Cost of Inaction, A Call To Action

While immigration reform is stalled in Congress, over 1,000 people are deported each day. This human cost of inaction from legislators has spurred immigrant advocates to up the ante on the fight for immigrant rights. Latino USA talks with organizers about why – and how- they continue to push for action.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

Jonathan Wolfe contributed reporting to this story.

israelIsrael Rodrigues Rubio is one of 30 DREAMers –undocumented youth brought to the US as children – who crossed the border on September 30th, 2013 as an act of civil disobedience organized by the National Immigrant Youth Alliance. He grew up in Durham, Nort Carolina and is a graduate of Columbia University. Despite all his successes, Israel’s undocumented status limited him in pursuing his dreams. By 2011, being a couple of months away from graduation, Israel settled on leaving for Mexico. In Mexico City, Israel had trouble integrating into a society he barely knew and was surrounded by increasing violence and political instability. In 2013 He decided he wanted to return to his family in the US.

DavidLeopoldDavid Wolfe Leopold is the founder and principal of David Wolfe Leopold & Associates Co. LPA. Mr. Leopold is the past president of the Washington, D.C.-based American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA www.aila.org), the premier bar association of immigration lawyers and professors in the U.S. He has served as AILA’s top liaison to the Department of Homeland Security’s key enforcement bureaus and co-founded the American Immigration Council’s Litigation Institute, a hands-on continuing legal education program focused on federal immigration litigation.

Gabriela Flora1Gabriela Flora is the Regional Project Voice Organizer of the American Friends Service Committee, Colorado. The organization is part of the Colorado Immigrant Rights Coalition, which succeeded in its fight to repeal SB-90, Colorado’s copycat Arizona-style show-me-your-papers law in 2012. In 2013 the Coalition had another victory – the approval of a law allowing for undocumented immigrants to access drivers’ licenses.

Pablo AlvaradoPablo Alvarado is an immigrant worker from El Salvador. In 2002, Alvarado became the national coordinator of the newly created National Day Laborer Organizing Network (NDLON), currently a collaboration of about three dozen community-based day laborer organizations. Under his guidance, NDLON works with local governments to help establish worker centers to move job seekers into places of safety.

 

 

 

 

News Or Noise: Talking Heads

In our ongoing feature on news literacy, we look at the talking heads who yell on television. A group of young journalists and media consumers teach us the best way to follow important news stories, and to see what’s behind all the screaming and yelling.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons

 

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Elisha FieldstadtElisha Fieldstadt is a news junkie who thinks she’s incredibly fortunate to work in an industry she is so passionate about. She is editor-in-chief of Baruch’s Dollars & Sense magazine and an intern at NBCNews.com. She is also the creator of Veganthropology.wordpress.com and a contributing writer for BoomPopMedia.com. In her very little bit of spare time she does yoga, bikes, cooks, bakes and explores Manhattan, where she has lived for five years. You can follow her @el_fields.
Juan JaraJuan Jara is a senior in high school and the photographer for the North Star online newspaper. He hopes to be a film director someday and cannot wait to start his first feature film.

Anam BaigAnam Baig is the copy chief for The Ticker at Baruch College in New York City.

palm trees
Samantha Votzke is a high school student in Tampa, Florida.

This Week’s Captions: BUEN PROVECHO!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA delves into issues of food this week. We’ll take a look at the consequences of cuts to food stamps. We’ll express our love for plantains, tortillas, and breakfast tacos. We’ll hear from an undocumented Bay Area family that makes hundreds of tamales per week, get some reflection on food and health from performance artist Robert Karimi, and celebrate the Mexican heritage of huitlacoche. And Pauline Campos of Latina magazine joins Latino USA producer Brenda Salinas to dispense some advice.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Food Stamp Fight

This November 1st, Americans receiving food stamps will have a little less to eat. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, was expanded during the recession as part of the 2009 Stimulus Package. Food stamp enrollment in the US has doubled between 2007 and now, from 26 million to 48 million people. But on November 1st, this expansion is set to expire, and millions of Americans will see their benefits reduced. Meanwhile, Congress is considering further cuts to the program. Producer Diana Montaño talks to New Yorkers to see how these cuts will affect them.

Photo by Latino USA

 
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Diana HeadshotDiana Montaño is a Mexico City-born, East Coast-raised producer for Latino USA. Before coming on board, she worked as an editor at the Phnom Penh Post in Cambodia and as an associate producer with Radio Bilingüe in California. Diana has also taught video production to immigrant and refugee youth in Oakland, and to young indigenous women in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. She is a graduate of the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

This Week’s Captions: ¡SALUD!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

¡Salud! This week Latino USA discusses questions of health. First, how stress and poverty can make you sick, and the latest on teen pregnancy. Then, Al Madrigal and Lalo Alcaraz talk Obamacare, and we check in with California, with stories of youth and rural health. Host Maria Hinojosa shares her newfound healthy enthusiasm for soccer, we hear about the wisdom of boxing, and we raise a glass to Latinos working in wine. All this, and social media reactions to the PBS “Latino Americans” series.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Al & Lalo: Ted Cruzin’ Around

Comedian Al Madrigal and cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz discuss Senator Ted Cruz, drivers’ licenses for undocumented migrants, and more.

Photo courtesy of Patrick Feller

 

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MADRIGAL-300x168A correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” since 2011, Al Madrigal has been named Best Stand-Up Comedian by the HBO/U.S. Comedy Arts Festival and his material dubbed “dynamic” by The New York Times. His unique, spontaneous and fast-paced lyrical storytelling style has made him a regular on television with numerous appearances on Comedy Central including his own half-hour Comedy Central Presents Special.

Lalo_hs-150x150Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip,“La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border.

This Week’s Captions: Questions of Authority

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week’s Latino USA examines’ questions of authority: who abuses it? How do you get it? And how do you maintain it? We’ll hear the stories of veterans and law enforcement. We’ll hear from a New York councilman from community asserting its power, discuss authority in media with students, a professor, and Univision anchor Jorge Ramos. And we’ll hear from two authorities in acting, Eugenio Derbez and Rita Moreno.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

NYC Election Milestone

Latinos have made their power felt in the New York City mayor’s race in a way not seen before, with celebrities like John Leguizamo and Junot Diaz endorsing candidate Bill DeBlasio. And in Brooklyn, the first Mexican-American ever will be on the city council. Politician Carlos Menchaca visits the Latino USA studios and talks about being not only the first Mexican-American councilmember, but also the first openly gay legislator to represent Brooklyn.

Photo courtesy Carlos2013.com

B2CarlosMenchaca_KaitiArchambault

Carlos Menchaca is a product of public schools and public housing, He is a native of El Paso, Texas raised by a single mother who immigrated from Mexico,  In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Carlos worked day and night, bringing together local leaders, community groups, and everyday New Yorkers to coordinate response efforts and hold New York City, State, and Federal officials accountable.

As New York City Council member, Carlos will represent residents of the 38th Council District, which encompasses Sunset Park, Red Hook, Greenwood Heights, Borough Park, Windsor Terrace and Bay Ridge Towers.

 

 

Deported Vets

Serving in the military can help immigrants gain U.S. citizenship. But vets who commit crimes may find themselves deported despite their service to the country. Latino USA speaks with a vet awaiting deportation and with filmmaker John Valadez, currently working on a documentary highlighting the cases of veterans who have been deported.

Photo courtesy Flickr

C1deportedvets_headshot_JohnValadezJohn Valadez is an award-winning director who has been producing documentaries for PBS for the last X years. He has been a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow, A Rockefeller Fellow and is a founding member of the New York Chapter of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers. He has worked on projects for Carleton UK Television, Frontline, American Masters, CBC, TLC and HBO.

 

 

 

 

C1DeportedVets_headshot_CraigShaginCraig Shagin is a lawyer in private practice in Pennsylvania, where egis firm is active in immigration law. He is a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association. He has authored numerous articles and books on various aspects of immigration law, including “Deporting Private Ryan: The Less Than Honorable Condition of the Non-Citizen in the United States Armed Forces.”

 

 

 

This Week’s Captions: Migration, Deportation, Intervention

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This episode of Latino USA examines government forces in our lives: first, the story of deportees who died in a California plane crash, whose identities were recently recovered. We’ll hear from the Mexico side of the border about the dangers faced by deportees. And, a Congressional proposal to end a US visa lottery. Also, how local governments are dealing with the federal “Secure Communities” program. And PBS’ Latino Americans documents the 500 year history of Latinos is the United States.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

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