Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Profiles’ Category

This Bill Of Rights Is Going To Change My Life

Nannies, housekeepers, and elder care workers are excluded from federal benefits, but California is the third state after New York and Hawaii to enact a bill of rights for domestic workers. Reporter Emily Wilson talked to two of them.

Photo courtesy of Flickr.

contributors1

emilyheadshotEmily Wilson is a freelance reporter and producer in San Francisco. She teaches media literacy, math, and English to adults earning their GED at City College of San Francisco.

This Week’s Captions: LIVE IN SACRAMENTO

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA is on the road and brings you this week’s show live from Sacramento. Host Maria Hinojosa interviews Californians about art and activism, writing and radio, and how the growth of California’s Latino population may indicate how the rest of the country adapts as Latinos become the largest minority.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Eddie Zazueta: Bay Area Rhymes

Nineteen-year-old Bay Area poet and rapper Eddie Zazueta writes about hip hop, street culture, and life in the Bay Area. He performed two original pieces for us at our live show in Sacramento.

Eddie opened with his song “Around the Sun,” where he speaks to the influence of hip-hop in his life:

And he closed with a performance of his poem “South Berkeley,” where he talks about life in the neighborhood where he grew up, and how it’s changing.

Photo courtesy of Youth Radio.

B1_Eduardo_Zazueta

Eddie Zazueta is a rapper and poet from Oakland, California. Eddie is a youth participant of Remix Your Life, a program of Youth Radio. Youth Radio is an Oakland-based media company that focuses on training youth in various forms of media production.

This Week’s Captions: LA LUCHA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This edition of Latino USA is all about “la lucha”-the fight or struggle-from the ongoing efforts of business leaders and activists to reform immigration policy to songwriter Robi Draco Rosa’s fight against cancer. Also: fights on cable news, one Spanish-language newspaper that’s fought for a hundred years for Latinos, a small town’s struggle for clean water, and words of wisdom from a Mexican wrestler.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Rossanna Rosado: Fighting To Tell The Story

Spanish language media has been around since the 19th Century but still struggles for respect from the rest of the media world. Maria Hinojosa speaks with Rossanna Rosado, publisher of New York’s El Diario La Prensa. The celebrated newspaper celebrates its centenary this year.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

And listen to Rosanna talk more about her experiences as a groundbreaking Latina journalist, and the history of Spanish-language media in the US, in the extended interview below:

RossanaRosado

Rossana Rosado has been a dominant force in New York media for 27 years. Using her Journalism degree from Pace University, she started as a City Hall reporter at El Diario La Prensa. She left the newspaper to join WPIX, Inc. as a Producer of Public A‑ airs programming. After rejoining El Diario La Prensa in 1995, she held the esteemed position of Editor in Chief, being the first woman to hold that position at the now 95 year old paper.

This Week’s Captions: BUEN PROVECHO!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA delves into issues of food this week. We’ll take a look at the consequences of cuts to food stamps. We’ll express our love for plantains, tortillas, and breakfast tacos. We’ll hear from an undocumented Bay Area family that makes hundreds of tamales per week, get some reflection on food and health from performance artist Robert Karimi, and celebrate the Mexican heritage of huitlacoche. And Pauline Campos of Latina magazine joins Latino USA producer Brenda Salinas to dispense some advice.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Homemade Oakland Tamales

Carolina Santos and her mother, Rosa Oliva, make tamales, tacos, and all sorts of other food for office workers and other clients, who are usually in San Francisco. But in West Oakland, California, where they live, the corner stores that exist offer little of the fresh produce they have access to in the food business. Maria Hinojosa spends a day with them and brings us her report.

And click below to listen to Rosa Oliva share her recipe for mole Oaxaqueño, en español:

This Week’s Captions: ¡SALUD!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

¡Salud! This week Latino USA discusses questions of health. First, how stress and poverty can make you sick, and the latest on teen pregnancy. Then, Al Madrigal and Lalo Alcaraz talk Obamacare, and we check in with California, with stories of youth and rural health. Host Maria Hinojosa shares her newfound healthy enthusiasm for soccer, we hear about the wisdom of boxing, and we raise a glass to Latinos working in wine. All this, and social media reactions to the PBS “Latino Americans” series.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Latino Vintage

Alex Sotelo arrived in California’s Napa Valley from Zacatecas, Mexico 22 years ago as a farmworker, and fell in love with the art and science of winemaking. He is now the owner his own winery, Alex Sotelo Cellars. Producer Diana Montaño joins him at the Summit Wine and Food Festival in Summit, New Jersey, where his wine is being featured for the fifth year in a row.

Image courtesy of Summit Wine and Food Festival.

C2_AlexAlex Sotelo was born in Jerez, Zacatecas Mexico; he came to Napa in 1991 and started to work in the vineyards as many immigrants do. It took many years of schooling and endless hours in the vineyards, doing experiments in the cellars and the valor to pursue his passion to get to where he is now, a well established and admired winemaker. For Alex this is a dream come true.

 

 

This Week’s Captions: Memories of friends and icons

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

In this special archive edition of Latino USA, we hear three essays from former gang member turned NPR producer John Guardo, about his escape from gang life and experience as an immigrant. Then, we remember civil rights icon Cesar Chavez, and Selena, the queen of Tejano music.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2014 Futurov Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

captcha

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027