Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Profiles’ Category

NOTICIANDO: VOCES

Mexican American women train to compete in Mexico’s Charro contest, raw poetry emerges from the Brooklyn projects, modernist architecture in Cuba, and an inside look at the masked men of Mexico’s Lucha Libre. These are documentary subjects on VOCES, a Latino arts and documentary showcase on public television. We speak to Sandie Pedlow, executive director of Latino Public Broadcasting.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Sandie Viquez Pedlow is the Executive Director of Latino Public broadcasting overseeing the development, production, and distribution of public media content that is representative of Latino people or address issues concerning Latino Americans. She brings to this position over 20 years experience in program development, production, and the development of international public media initiatives. Most recently she was Director, Station Relations for PBS Education where she led the implementation and marketing of PBS online and digital media products and services. Prior to PBS, Pedlow was Director of Programming Strategies, Associate Director of Cultural, Drama and Arts Programming, and Senior Program Officer with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for 10 years. She managed the development and funding of national public broadcasting programs which addressed social and diversity issues, history, the arts and many aspects of American culture. Pedlow was a key member of the CPB team that managed the founding of LPB. Prior to this work, Pedlow developed and produced documentaries, cultural/arts television programs for SCETV and was the U.S. National Coordinator for INPUT, an international public television conference with more than 35 participating

MIS GETS POLITICO

Former record-exec-turned-musician Camilo Lara, aka Mexican Institute of Sound, talks to us about the inspiration behind his new album, Político, about sonidero and about his sonic legacy.


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Mexican Institute of Sound (MIS; or Instituto Mexicano Del Sonido) is an electronic music project created by Mexico City-based DJ and producer Camilo Lara. Lara is the former president of EMI Mexico. He is part of a growing Mexican electronica movement, encouraging fusions of folk and more traditional music with modern sounds.

Wonder Twin Julián

At 37, San Antonio mayor Julian Castro already has a decade of political office under his belt. And now he is getting the Democratic Party’s national spotlight as the keynote speaker at the convention in Charlotte. Meanwhile, his twin brother Joaquin is running for Congress. Hernán Rozemberg of the Fronteras desk brings us this profile.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Texarkana Gazette. 

Hernán Rozemberg is award-winning journalist with more than 16 years of experience. He has worked for various newspapers, including The Arizona Republic and the San Antonio Express-News. For more than a decade, he has specialized in coverage of immigration and border issues, including at his current position as Senior Correspondent and Bureau Chief for a Southwest public media project, Fronteras: The Changing America Desk.  He holds at Master’s in International Relations from St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, Texas.

The Miseducation of Ana Tijoux

French-Chilean rapper Ana Tijoux talks to Latino USA producer Nadia Reiman about how politics and books have influenced her music, and about what she wants to contribute to the South American hip hop music scene.


Click here to download this week’s show. See below for Ana Tijoux’s video, “Shock,” for Puente Arizona.

Nadia Reiman has been a radio producer since 2005. Before joining the Latino USA team, Nadia produced for StoryCorps for almost five years, and her work there on 9/11 stories earned her a Peabody. She has also mixed audio for animations, assisted on podcasts for magazines, and program managed translations for Canon Latin America. Nadia has also produced for on None on Record editing and mixing stories of queer Africans, and worked on a Spanish language radio show called Epicentro based out of Washington DC. She graduated from Kenyon College with a double major in International Studies and Spanish Literature.

Know Your Pro: Picture Perfect

Matt Armendariz travels all over the world to transform delectable dishes into photographs that look good enough to eat. If you’re a foodie who consumes cookbooks and food magazines, you’ve probably come across his handiwork. He tells us how he came by his shooting skills from his home and studio in Long Beach, California.

Do you know a pro we should know?

We’re looking for people with uncommon jobs: tightrope walkers, road kill disposers, chewing gum testers. We’d love to hear your suggestions for people we should profile. You can write us online, in the comments below; send us an email at info@futuromediagroup.org; or call our listener line at 646-571-1228.


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F‪or the past 20 years Matt Armendariz been immersed in food in one way or another. As a former graphic designer and art director in the food industry he surrounded himself with great food before branching out into photography and blogging. He began his blog in 2005 as a way to share his personal take on food and those behind-the-scenes moments I experienced in his work. His first cookbook called On A Stick! was released by Quirk in May 2011.

Revisiting Damian Lopez Alfonso, Cuban Cyclist

Cycling is not only Damian Lopez Alfonso’s life but also his passion. Despite being injured as a child in Cuba, Damian has ridden his way to the top, recently qualifying for the 2012 Paralympics in London. We revisit his story this week.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Fuji Bikes.

Rising Republican Star

New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez has said repeatedly that she would not accept an offer from Mitt Romney if he asked her to be on the ticket with him in November.  Still, she could influence the GOP to moderate their immigration policies.  Sarah Gustavus has this profile of a rising political star, part of new generation of Latino leaders.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of The Hispanic Blog.

Sarah Gustavus reports on topics like government, immigration and poverty for public radio and television, most recently as a reporter and host at KUNM in Albuquerque. Her work has aired nationally on All Things Considered, Weekend America, Making Contact, and Tell Me More. She grew up on a cattle ranch in Texas and spent several years developing her broadcasting skills in Seattle. She is currently studying for a master’s in media at City University in London, where her research focuses on news coverage of immigration.

YANIRA’S STORY

The numbers are shocking: one in seven Latinas in the U.S. will make an attempt to take her own life.

It’s not widely known or reported, but young Latinas attempt suicide at much higher rates than girls in other ethnic groups. Today on the program, we try to understand why. We have invited Dr. Luis Zayas to join us and to serve as our guide. Zayas teaches in Saint Louis, at both the School of Medicine at Washington University and at its School of Social Work, where he founded and directs the Center for Latino Family Research. It’s the only one of its kind in the nation: a social research center dedicated to Latino health, mental health, and family & community development in the U.S. and in Latin America.

But each story of a Latina teen suicide attempt is a deeply personal story. So, on today’s program we meet Yanira — a young Dominican-American who lives in Harlem and who has struggled with depression—and repression—for years. Yanira’s life is a contradiction: she’s forced to act like an adult, while being denied the permission to do things that many ordinary teenagers can do.

Reporter Laura Starecheski takes us inside her story.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

SB1070 and Jenny Rivera

PHOENIX – A Federal judge in Phoenix today blocked three of the most controversial sections of SB 1070, the law aimed at undocumented immigrants in Arizona.

Judge Susan Bolton, who was appointed to the Federal bench by President Clinton, ruled that the State of Arizona could not require law enforcement officers to check the immigration status of persons they stop for other reasons and whom they suspect are in the country illegally. Nor, the judge ordered, can Arizona require that individuals carry papers proving their immigration status. The law also would have made it illegal for undocumented people to seek employment in Arizona: that, too, was invalidated.

The law will go into effect on Thursday, but without three of the measures that most concerned civil libertarians.

Governor Jan Brewer (R) issued a statement saying she would appeal the ruling, adding “The fight is far from over.”

Maria Hinojosa talks with Professor Jenny Rivera of the CUNY Law School and the founder and director of the school’s Center on Latino and Latina Rights and Equality about today’s decision.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

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