Archive for the ‘Race’ Category

Flirty Racism: It’s a Thing

“You’re beautiful for a Spanish woman. I love it when Spanish girls speak Spanish.”

“Are you full Asian? You don’t look full Asian.”

“You’re the first black person I’ve ever dated.”

The intention is to flatter by highlighting difference. To compliment a person of color by making them feel “exotic”. These are just some of the examples we got by going out on the streets of New York City and asking people of color if they’d ever experienced what author Rula Al-Nasrawi calls #FlirtyRacism. 

In her article for VICE, “Calling Me A Terrorist Is Not Flirting,” Al-Nasrawi talks about the many times she’s been exoticized as a Middle-Eastern woman and the not so few times people have hit on her by jokingly calling her “a terrorist.”

At first, people on the streets were a little bit confused with the term. But when Al-Nasrawi told them one of the many outrageous pick-up lines she gets, people suddenly got it. Almost immediately,  the men and women of color we talked to remembered a pick-up line that turned out to be incredibly insulting or awkward, because it focused on their ethnicity. 

We found the many subtypes of flirty racism out there. From the very common “you’re cute for your ethnic group”, to the exotic generalization (“you look like that only other actress I’m aware of from your ethnic background”), to the incredibly insulting “you can’t be … you’re too tall.”

We also asked people on the streets of New York City what the new flirting etiquette should be and we even got some sailors to react to Al-Nasrawi being cat-called a terrorist.

 

Rula

Rula Al-Nasrawi is a freelance journalist living in New York City. A California native, her work has been featured on the San Francisco Bay Guardian, VICE, The Atlantic and Galore magazines. Rula is a hardcore pug lover, and always finds time to giggle at a good pun. Tweet her @rulaoftheworld.

 

 

 

 

Photo by Tiziana Fabi AFP/Getty Images

Eddie Zazueta: Bay Area Rhymes

Nineteen-year-old Bay Area poet and rapper Eddie Zazueta writes about hip hop, street culture, and life in the Bay Area. He performed two original pieces for us at our live show in Sacramento.

Eddie opened with his song “Around the Sun,” where he speaks to the influence of hip-hop in his life:

And he closed with a performance of his poem “South Berkeley,” where he talks about life in the neighborhood where he grew up, and how it’s changing.

Photo courtesy of Youth Radio.

B1_Eduardo_Zazueta

Eddie Zazueta is a rapper and poet from Oakland, California. Eddie is a youth participant of Remix Your Life, a program of Youth Radio. Youth Radio is an Oakland-based media company that focuses on training youth in various forms of media production.

Food Stamp Fight

This November 1st, Americans receiving food stamps will have a little less to eat. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, was expanded during the recession as part of the 2009 Stimulus Package. Food stamp enrollment in the US has doubled between 2007 and now, from 26 million to 48 million people. But on November 1st, this expansion is set to expire, and millions of Americans will see their benefits reduced. Meanwhile, Congress is considering further cuts to the program. Producer Diana Montaño talks to New Yorkers to see how these cuts will affect them.

Photo by Latino USA

 
contributors1

Diana HeadshotDiana Montaño is a Mexico City-born, East Coast-raised producer for Latino USA. Before coming on board, she worked as an editor at the Phnom Penh Post in Cambodia and as an associate producer with Radio Bilingüe in California. Diana has also taught video production to immigrant and refugee youth in Oakland, and to young indigenous women in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. She is a graduate of the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

News or Noise? – Authority

In this installment of our “News or Noise?” feature, Latino USA producer Daisy Rosario asks students and a journalism professor about whether certain news sources have more authority and legitimacy, and the role of ethnic media in telling the stories of communities of color.

The young journalists featured got their start in ethnic media and community reporting at the Mott Haven Herald and Hunts Point Express.

“News Or Noise?” is a regular segment where Latino USA explores issues around news literacy.

Photo courtesy Flickr

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A2_Angely MercadoAngely Mercado is a 21 year old Hunter College student who is currently studying Creative Writing and Journalism. She hopes to eventually become a freelance journalist and fiction writer, or a staff writer for the New York Times. Until then, she’ll continue to intern and enter as many writing contests as she possibly can. Apart from being a student and aspiring writer, Angely also randomly longboards and does photography. Those activities help the creative process.

A2_Fausto Giovanny PintoFausto Giovanny Pinto is a reporter from the Bronx who has written for a host of community newspapers in the Borough. He is currently a student at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. He has Interned with Newsday and is currently a stringer for the New York Times.

 

shaniceShanice Carr is a student journalist currently attending Hunter College to study English with a concentration in Linguistics and Rhetoric.

 

 

A3 MaiteMaite Junco has been an editor and reporter for over 20 years.
She spent 15 years at the New York Daily News in three different stints between 1995 and 2012. Maite was part of the team that led the paper’s award-winning coverage of the Blackout of 2003 and the Abner Louima police brutality case. She currently serves as editor of Voices of NY.

Maite has a B.A. in Journalism and Latin American Studies from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She also studied abroad in Paris, Buenos Aires and Salamanca, Spain. Born in San Juan to Cuban parents, Maite lives in East Harlem.

Stop, Frisk and Seize

Imagine being pulled over in a “driving-while-brown” situation and then having your car seized by the police—without even being charged with a crime.  Maria Hinojosa discusses how this is happening across the country with The New Yorker magazine staff writer Sarah Stillman. Sarah wrote a feature article for the magazine titled “Taken” where she investigates this pattern of civil forfeitures.

Photo courtesy Flickr

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Sarah Stillman is a staff writer for The New Yorker and a visiting scholar at NYU’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute.  Her recent work has received the National Magazine Award, the Michael Kelly Award for the “fearless pursuit and expression of truth,” the Overseas Press Club’s Joe & Laurie Dine Award for International Human Rights Reporting, and the Hillman Prize for Magazine Journalism.

 

 

Remembering Latino World War II Vets

Latino USA explores the contributions Latinos made to the fight during World War II, and we learn about one soldier who captured around 1,500 prisoners of war. We speak with Prof. Maggie Rivas-Rodríguez, who has collected over 600 stories of Latino WWII vets.

Photo courtesy Voces Project

And check out the Voces Oral History Project’s piece on Latino WWII vets:

Foto-Voz: Ramon Galindo from Voces Oral History Project on Vimeo.

C2WW2VETS_headshot_MaggieRivasMaggie Rivas-Rodriguez is an Associate Professor of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. She has more than 17 years of daily news experience, mostly as a reporter for the Boston Globe, WFAA-TV in Dallas and the Dallas Morning News. Her research interests include the intersection of oral history and journalism, U.S. Latinos and the news media. Since 1999, Rivas-Rodriguez has spearheaded the U.S. Latino and Latina Oral History Project “Voces”.

 

 

 

 

Katrina One Year Later (2006)

In this 2006 archive story from Waveland, Mississippi, Rolando Arrieta reports on how immigrant workers helped rebuild homes, schools, and hospitals in the year after Hurricane Katrina.

Bill Clinton (1993)

The death of Trayvon Martin and acquittal of George Zimmerman have prompted calls for a national discussion of race. But we’ve heard this before: in 1993, President Bill Clinton urged the same.

Image courtesy of Latino USA Archives

News or Noise: Bias

In the latest installment of our news literacy series News or Noise, senior producer Carolina Gonzalez talks with journalism students Hanna Guerrero and Laura Rodriguez about what we mean when we discuss bias in the news media.

Image courtesy of MSNBC

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Special thanks to our collaborators on our “News or Noise?” segment:
Radio Camp at Union Docs
The Pasos al Futuro Workshop at DePaul University 


head_shot_lasloHanna Guerrero is a journalism student at DePaul University. She is a summer intern at Latino USA.

 

 

 

Laura Rodriguez was born and raised in Guanajuato, Mexico and came to the United States at the age of 9. She is currently a 4th year student at DePaul University pursuing a degree in broadcast journalism, a minor in Latino Media and in the Spanish Language.

Latinos in College, the New and the Old

We often hear about Latinos being underrepresented in college campuses when compared to other ethnicities. A recent report, however, shows that for the first time, there are more Latino high school graduates entering college than whites. But what about finishing college? For an overview on new and old trends, María Hinojosa speaks with Richard Fry, senior research associate at the Pew Research Hispanic Center.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/always.amym.

 

Fry.photoRichard Fry is a senior economist at the Pew Research Hispanic Center. He is an expert on school and college enrollment in the United States, as well as the returns to education in the labor market, marriage market, and its connection to household economic well-being such as net worth. Before joining the Pew Research Center in 2002, he was a senior economist at the Educational Testing Service (ETS).

Diversity on Trial

Race-conscious admissions policies have opened the college doors for many Latino students. Now, Fisher v University of Texas at Austin, a case soon to be decided by the Supreme Court, may change how schools are allowed to factor in race. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with Angelo Ancheta, a law professor at Santa Clara University and the Counsel of Record for a Friend of the Court brief filed in the Fisher case.

Image courtesy of Flickr.com/SalFalko.

Tanya

Angelo N. Ancheta is the director of the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center at Santa Clara University School of Law. He is the former Director of the Civil Rights Project at Harvard University, and the former Executive Director at the Asian Law Caucus. Mr. Ancheta served as the Counsel of Record for the Friend of the Court Brief filed by the American Educational Research Association in the Fisher v University of Texas at Austin case.

News Taco: Who’s Latino?

Is Jorge Bergoglio, aka Pope Francis, Latino? Does it matter? Why did Bruno Mars drop his Puerto Rican father’s surname? And who is the new Obama staffer Miguel Rodriguez? Latino USA guest host Felix Contreras gets the answers in conversation with Victor Landa, editor of the site News Taco.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Flickr.

Victor-150x150Victor Landa is the founder and editor of NewsTaco, a website that provides news, analysis and critique from a Latino perspective. He worked as a writer and editor for 30 years, mostly with Telemundo and Univisión. Landa also contributed to the San Antonio Express-News, and he is an adviser on media strategy, message crafting, storytelling and public speaking.

This is Bushwick

It’s a web comedy series about a group of friends living in the fast changing Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn. The new season of “East Willy B” premiers March 20th. Host María Hinojosa speaks with producer and actress Julia Grob about the “new generation Latino” sensibility of the show.


Click here to download this week’s show. 

JuliaGrobHeadshot Julia Ahumada Grob is an actor, writer, and creative producer of Chilean and Jewish heritage. She is the co-creator and lead actor of “East WillyB.” Named one of 25 emerging theater artists by Kevin Spacey, Julia has appeared on screen opposite Rosie Perez, Andre Royo (“The Wire”), Jaime Tirelli (“Girl Fight”) and onstage opposite Kathy Najimy, Billy Crudup, and Jason Biggs. Julia is a 2011 Fellow of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP), Latino Producers Academy and Latino Artist Mentoring Program. Julia holds a BA from Brown University and has studied acting with the Labyrinth Theater Company, Steppenwolf Theater Company and at Upright Citizen’s Brigade.

THE LANGUAGES OF NATIVIDAD

Many of the new farmworkers in California’s Salinas Valley are indigenous. They speak dozens of languages and often, no Spanish at all. One hospital in the Salinas Valley is figuring out how to provide services in languages like Mixteca, Zapoteca and Triqui. Reporter Lisa Morehouse has this story.


Click here to download this week’s show. 

Image: Dr. Peter Chandler, Victor Sosa, Petra Leon, and Angelica Isidro go from English, to Spanish, to Mixteco. Leon, a Mixteco speaker, plans to give birth at Natividad in a couple of months. Photo courtesy of Lisa Morehouse.

 

Lisa-Morehouse

Lisa Morehouse is a public radio and print journalist, who has filed for National Public Radio, American Public Media, KQED Public Radio, Edutopia, and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa. For the last year she’s reported and produced a public radio series New Harvest: The Future of Small Town California KQED’s The California Report. KALW is currently airing pieces she created while teaching radio production to incarcerated youth.

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS IN THE HEIGHTS

The Upper Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights has long been home to the country’s largest Dominican-American community. Now it’s also home to a new reality show produced by MTV. We speak with a group of young Washington Heights residents about how the show represents their ‘hood.


Click here to download this week’s show

The following people graciously sat down with us to watch Washington Heights and give us their opinion:


Dr. Cyrus Boquín

 

 

 

 


Cynthia Carrion

 

 

 

 

 

 


John Paul Infante

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