Archive for the ‘Race’ Category

RACISM IN CUBA

Since 1959, the Cuban government has combatted racial discrimination. Officially all Cubans had the same opportunities.  But since the harsh economic times in the 1990s, black Cubans complain of increasing racial discrimination. Reese Erlich reports from Havana on this controversial issue.


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Reese Erlich is a best-selling book author and freelance journalist who writes regularly for the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Radio, Marketplace Radio and National Public Radio.

REVIEWING THE CENTRAL PARK FIVE

Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Newsday film critic Rafer Guzman about The Central Park Five, a new documentary by Ken Burns and his daughter Sarah Burns about a 1989 case where five young men were convicted of the brutal rape of a jogger. This case became a lightning rod about youth of color and violence in New York and in the nation.


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Rafer Guzman is the film critic for Newsday. He is also a contributing critic to WNYC’s “The Takeaway” and co-host of the podcast “Movie Date.”

 



LIFE AFTER CENTRAL PARK

Yusef Salaam, one of the exonerated teens convicted of rape in the Central Park jogger case, talks about life after prison and about watching himself on screen in the film The Central Park Five.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of Maysles Institute.

Yusef Salaam was born and raised in New York City. He attended Public School 83, Manhattan East, The Arts Student League of New York and studied art at LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and jewelry making at the Fashion Institute of Technology. On April 19, 1989, at just 15 years of age, he learned that he, along with other young boys were being falsely arrested for rape. Yusef Salaam served approximately 7 years of his life in prison along with 3 years on parole. Now a proud father, Yusef advocates for education, the need for videotaping of all police interrogations, for policy change in the child welfare system & the prison industrial complex, the effects of the disenfranchisement of poor people and its overwhelming effects on their families and the entire community at large. He sits on the Board of the Campaign to End the Death Penalty, the advisory Board for The Learn My History Foundation: dedicated to Youth Empowerment, Education and Change, and is the inspiration behind People United for Children.

GHETTO LIFE 101

The improbable story of Power Fuerza, the album that laid the ground for the birth of hip hop. The Ghetto Brothers were a gang that brokered peace among other Bronx gangs, took up guitars and combined Beatles melodies, James Brown funk and Santana psychedelic fuzz in a record that sounds like nothing less than a party.


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Carolina Gonzalez is an award-winning journalist and scholar with over two decades of experience in print and radio. She served as an editorial writer at the New York Daily News, and has covered education, immigration, politics, music and Latino culture in various alternative and mainstream media outlets, such as WNYC radio, AARP Segunda Juventud, SF Weekly and the Progressive Media Project. The guidebook she co-authored with Seth Kugel, Nueva York: the Complete Guide to Latino Life in the Five Boroughs, was published in 2006 by St. Martin’s Press. She was raised in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and Queens, New York and lives in Brooklyn, New York.

SOMOS: HOW AMERICAN ARE PUERTO RICANS?

Puerto Ricans are U.S. citizens but are often made to feel like outsiders. And those residing on the island see their identity differently from those living in the U.S. mainland. The future of the island’s political relation to the U.S. is still in question, but many feel their cultural identity as Puerto Rican first. Part of our regular series of conversations on Latino identity, Somos/We Are.


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Explaining Somos

“Somos” is the name of a series that we are starting where we explore issues of Latino identity. We invite you to tell us how you identify yourself by making a video on youtube, posting a comment here, or leaving a message old-school style on our phone (yes, we have a phone attached to a wall!) at 646-571-1228. Don’t forget to tell us your name and where you’re calling us from. And after you post your video, tell us about it here or tweet us! We love hearing from you.

Alejandro Arbona is a freelance writer, editor, and brand research consultant based in New York City. He was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where people were constantly under the impression he was an American tourist. As an editor for five years at Marvel Entertainment, Alejandro oversaw, among other things, a series of “Fantastic Four” comic books set in Puerto Rico, prominently featuring Old San Juan, the rainforest of El Yunque, the bioluminescent bay of Vieques, and el chupacabras.

 

Frances Negrón-Muntaner is a filmmaker, writer, and scholar, as well as the director of Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race. Among her books are Boricua Pop: Puerto Ricans and the Latinization of American Culture (CHOICE Award, 2004) and Sovereign Acts (South End Press, 2010). Her films include AIDS in the Barrio (Gold Award at the John Muir Film Festival, 1989), Brincando el charco: Portrait of a Puerto Rican (Whitney Biennial, 1995), and the upcoming television show, War in Guam. Negrón-Muntaner is also a founding board member and past chair of NALIP, National Association of Latino Independent Producers. In 2005, she was named one of the most influential Hispanics by Hispanic Business Magazine, and in 2008, the United Nations’ Rapid Response Media Mechanism recognized her as a global expert in the areas of mass media and Latin/o American studies. Most recently, El Diario/La Prensa selected her as one of the 2010 recipients of their annual “Distinguished Women Award.”

Ray Suarez joined The NewsHour in October 1999 as a Washington-based Senior Correspondent. Suarez has more than thirty years of varied experience in the news business. He came to The NewsHour from National Public Radio where he had been host of the nationwide, call-in news program “Talk of the Nation” since 1993. Prior to that, he spent seven years covering local, national, and international stories for the NBC-owned station, WMAQ-TV in Chicago. He is the author most recently of a book examining the tightening relationship between religion and politics in America, The Holy Vote: The Politics of Faith in America.  Suarez currently hosts the monthly radio program “America Abroad” for Public Radio International, and the weekly politics program “Destination Casa Blanca” for Hispanic Information Telecommunications Network, HITN TV. Suarez was a co-recipient of NPR’s 1993-94 and 1994-95 duPont-Columbia Silver Baton Awards for on-site coverage of the first all-race elections in South Africa and the first 100 days of the 104th Congress, respectively. He was honored with the 1996 Ruben Salazar Award from the National Council of La Raza, and the 2005 Distinguished Policy Leadership Award from UCLA’s School of Public Policy. The Holy Vote won a 2007 Latino Book Award for Best Religion Book.

SOMOS: HOW YOU SEE YOUR IDENTITY

We feature excerpts from one of two videos that Caesar Sanchez from Austin, Texas, sent us about his family members’ sense of their identity. The videos were sent in response to our call for how our listeners see their identities as part of our series SOMOS/We Are.


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Somos por Roxanne Coffman from Ceasar Sanchez on Vimeo.

Somos por Ricardo Siller from Ceasar Sanchez on Vimeo.

Noticiando: Remembering Haitian Massacre

Seventy-five years ago, President Rafael Trujillo ordered all Haitians living along the Dominican border killed. Prof. Edward Paulino speaks about an effort organized by Dominicans and Haitians living on the U.S. to commemorate the anniversary and foster healthy Dominican-Haitian relations.


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Professor Edward Paulino teaches history at CUNY’s John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He is on the board of the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife and two children.

A Sneak Peek at America By The Numbers: Clarkston, Georgia

One in three people nowadays are immigrants, Asians, Latinos or African Americans and whites are no longer a majority. This shift is most pronounced in rural areas of the country, particularly in the South. This first episode of “America By the Numbers” visits Clarkson, Georgia, where in the last 30 years, whites have gone from being 90 percent of the population to less than 14 percent. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa goes in search of the new multicultural America in this companion radio story to the half hour PBS television special airing Sept. 21st.

Click here to download this week’s show. For more information on America By The Numbers (and to watch a trailer!), check out our website. And to find out where it’s playing, check out the Need To Know website on PBS.

 

 

NOTICIANDO: Changing Census

Filling out the census can be a bit confusing for those who don’t always identify with the limited options on race or ethnicity. But for the first time, the Census Bureau is considering adding “Hispanic” and “Latino” as a race category. We speak to Angelo Falcon, president of the National Institute for Latino Policy, to see if these changes would help gather more accurate information about Latinos.

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Angelo Falcon is President and Co-Founder of the National Institute for Latino Policy (NiLP). Falcón has been able to combine academic and policy research with an aggressive advocacy style based on broad coalition-building and community organizing. He has become one of the longest-serving chief executives of a Latino non-profit in the country.

Born in East L.A, 25 Years Later

The iconic cult classic Born in East LA turns 25 this month. This film brought issues of Latino identity and immigration to the big screen with a sense of humor. Latino USA Producer Nadia Reiman explores the movie’s impact.


Click here to download this week’s show. To read more about Prof. Rosa Linda Fregoso’s work, click here. To check out what filmmaker Jim Mendiola is up to, click here.

Nadia Reiman has been a radio producer since 2005. Before joining the Latino USA team, Nadia produced for StoryCorps for almost five years, and her work there on 9/11 stories earned her a Peabody. She has also mixed audio for animations, assisted on podcasts for magazines, and program managed translations for Canon Latin America. Nadia has also produced for on None on Record editing and mixing stories of queer Africans, and worked on a Spanish language radio show called Epicentro based out of Washington DC. She graduated from Kenyon College with a double major in International Studies and Spanish Literature.

Does Fixing Food Deserts Help Fix Obesity?

A number of cities have taken up programs to put more fresh foods into corner stores to improve so-called “food deserts.” Nevin Cohen, an assistant professor at the New School in New York, shares his thoughts on whether having more fresh fruits and vegetables in low-income neighborhoods really affects obesity rates–or if the problem goes beyond access to certain foods.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Inhabitat New York City.

Nevin Cohen is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at The New School,where he teaches courses in urban food systems and environmental studies, including cross-disciplinary courses that connect the fields of policy, urban planning, design, and urban studies. Dr. Cohen’s current research focuses on the development of urban food policy. He has a PhD in Urban Planning from Rutgers University, a Masters in City and Regional Planning from Berkeley, and a BA from Cornell.

A Conversation With Olympian John Orozco

Maria Hinojosa talks with Olympic gymnast John Orozco of the Bronx.  Orozco is one of two Latino athletes on the US Olympic gymnastic team competing in London.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of New News.

John Orozco is an American gymnast and the 2012 Visa National Champion. He currently trains at the United States Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO.

Somos: What’s In A Name?

Latino, Afro-Cuban, Chicano, Mexican-American:  For as long as people of Latin American descent have been a part of the U.S. they’ve been referred to by many names. What’s more, we even have different names for ourselves. In this segment of our new Somos series, we talk to writers and activists about what name they choose to identify themselves by – and why it matters.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of jeremystatton.com.

Explaining Somos

“Somos” is the name of a series that we are starting where we explore issues of Latino identity. We invite you to tell us how you identify yourself by making a video on youtube, posting a comment here, or leaving a message old-school style on our phone (yes, we have a phone attached to a wall!) at 646-571-1228. Don’t forget to tell us your name and where you’re calling us from. And after you post your video, tell us about it here or tweet us! We love hearing from you.

Marina Garcia-Vasquez is the co-founder and director of MexntheCity.com, a culture site and creative consultancy collective. The group aims to promote Mexican culture and heritage in a positive light through the accomplishments of Mexican nationals and Mexican-Americans both in the United States, Mexico, and globally. Based in New York City, Marina is a working journalist dedicated to writing about art, design, and architecture. She is a recent graduate of Columbia University’s School of Journalism M.A. program in Arts and Culture and a published poet.

Roland Roebuck is a recognized DC activist nationally known as a leading spokesperson on issues that impact Latino Afro-Descendants. He has worked tirelessly to champion human and civil rights. He is a founding member of several Washington DC community organizations and has compelled national organizations and elected officials to implement initiatives that address the needs of minority groups.

 

Matthew Yglesias is Slate’s business and economics correspondent and author of Slate’s Moneybox column. Before joining the magazine he worked for ThinkProgress, the Atlantic, TPM Media, and the American Prospect. His first book, Heads in the Sand, was published in 2008. His second, The Rent Is Too Damn High, was published in March.

Russell Peters

Where do you draw the lines of what is or isn’t offensive? Canadian South-Asian Comedian Russell Peters creates his own boundaries with his bold stand-up routines that challenge the notion of political correctness. He isn’t afraid to make fun of all races, and is an astute observer of how we as Americans interact with each other. Peters reveals his inspiration for his humor and how he has found success in poking fun at the immigrant experience. Produced by Yasmeen Qureshi.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

New Mexico’s Memory of Land: The Legacy of Tijerina

In June of 1967, in the small town of Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico, a group of Hispanos calling themselves “La Alianza” or the Alliance, attempted to make a citizens arrest of the state district attorney. During the attempted arrest, two people were shot, others were held at gunpoint, and the district attorney, who wasn’t even present at the time, got away. What happened during the days that followed looked like a revolution to the rest of the country. And the attention of the authorities fell mainly on La Alianza’s fiery, charismatic leader Reies Lopez Tijerina. A former Pentecostal preacher from a south Texas ranching community, Tijerina left Texas to found a utopian community in Arizona, and then moved to New Mexico to recover lost land grants for old Hispano families. Today, we have a special rebroadcast of a documentary about Reies Lopez Tijerina. Producer Adam Saytanides traveled to the Mexican central highlands, where he found an aging Tijerina.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

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