Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Race’ Category

Katrina One Year Later (2006)

In this 2006 archive story from Waveland, Mississippi, Rolando Arrieta reports on how immigrant workers helped rebuild homes, schools, and hospitals in the year after Hurricane Katrina.

Bill Clinton (1993)

The death of Trayvon Martin and acquittal of George Zimmerman have prompted calls for a national discussion of race. But we’ve heard this before: in 1993, President Bill Clinton urged the same.

Image courtesy of Latino USA Archives

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: In the Air, On the Air

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we go to California to find out how agricultural workers are protecting themselves from deadly heat. Then, we learn about how residents of Albuquerque are measuring pollution in the air. We explore what we mean when we discuss bias in the news media. And we hear from immigrants to the US who don’t want to become citizens.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

News or Noise: Bias

In the latest installment of our news literacy series News or Noise, senior producer Carolina Gonzalez talks with journalism students Hanna Guerrero and Laura Rodriguez about what we mean when we discuss bias in the news media.

Image courtesy of MSNBC

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Special thanks to our collaborators on our “News or Noise?” segment:
Radio Camp at Union Docs
The Pasos al Futuro Workshop at DePaul University 


head_shot_lasloHanna Guerrero is a journalism student at DePaul University. She is a summer intern at Latino USA.

 

 

 

Laura Rodriguez was born and raised in Guanajuato, Mexico and came to the United States at the age of 9. She is currently a 4th year student at DePaul University pursuing a degree in broadcast journalism, a minor in Latino Media and in the Spanish Language.

This Week’s Captions: INTO THE WILD… NEW WORLD

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we hear from Latino college graduates on what it’s like to step into the brave new world, with a little word of advice. And, a recent study shows Latinos entering U.S. colleges at a higher rate than any other ethnic group: but, what about college completion? Then, we bring you an update on Fisher v University of Texas at Austin, a case on affirmative action and college admission, soon to be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. A look back at the “Bracero Program,” with a taste of injustice. Finally, a tour of a garden between the U.S. and Mexico where the flora and fauna defy the border fence.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Latinos in College, the New and the Old

We often hear about Latinos being underrepresented in college campuses when compared to other ethnicities. A recent report, however, shows that for the first time, there are more Latino high school graduates entering college than whites. But what about finishing college? For an overview on new and old trends, María Hinojosa speaks with Richard Fry, senior research associate at the Pew Research Hispanic Center.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/always.amym.

 

Fry.photoRichard Fry is a senior economist at the Pew Research Hispanic Center. He is an expert on school and college enrollment in the United States, as well as the returns to education in the labor market, marriage market, and its connection to household economic well-being such as net worth. Before joining the Pew Research Center in 2002, he was a senior economist at the Educational Testing Service (ETS).

Diversity on Trial

Race-conscious admissions policies have opened the college doors for many Latino students. Now, Fisher v University of Texas at Austin, a case soon to be decided by the Supreme Court, may change how schools are allowed to factor in race. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with Angelo Ancheta, a law professor at Santa Clara University and the Counsel of Record for a Friend of the Court brief filed in the Fisher case.

Image courtesy of Flickr.com/SalFalko.

Tanya

Angelo N. Ancheta is the director of the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center at Santa Clara University School of Law. He is the former Director of the Civil Rights Project at Harvard University, and the former Executive Director at the Asian Law Caucus. Mr. Ancheta served as the Counsel of Record for the Friend of the Court Brief filed by the American Educational Research Association in the Fisher v University of Texas at Austin case.

News Taco: Who’s Latino?

Is Jorge Bergoglio, aka Pope Francis, Latino? Does it matter? Why did Bruno Mars drop his Puerto Rican father’s surname? And who is the new Obama staffer Miguel Rodriguez? Latino USA guest host Felix Contreras gets the answers in conversation with Victor Landa, editor of the site News Taco.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Flickr.

Victor-150x150Victor Landa is the founder and editor of NewsTaco, a website that provides news, analysis and critique from a Latino perspective. He worked as a writer and editor for 30 years, mostly with Telemundo and Univisión. Landa also contributed to the San Antonio Express-News, and he is an adviser on media strategy, message crafting, storytelling and public speaking.

This Week’s Captions: News or Noise? The A-Word

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Get ready for our new series New or Noise where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation and help you see the forest from the trees! First up: Amnesty. What does it mean? When did it become a dirty word? Our first News or Noise segment tells you more. Then we take you to North Carolina where undocumented teens are getting specially marked licenses. Is this helping? And we go digital—with an interview about a new web comedy series called East Willy B.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This is Bushwick

It’s a web comedy series about a group of friends living in the fast changing Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn. The new season of “East Willy B” premiers March 20th. Host María Hinojosa speaks with producer and actress Julia Grob about the “new generation Latino” sensibility of the show.


Click here to download this week’s show. 

JuliaGrobHeadshot Julia Ahumada Grob is an actor, writer, and creative producer of Chilean and Jewish heritage. She is the co-creator and lead actor of “East WillyB.” Named one of 25 emerging theater artists by Kevin Spacey, Julia has appeared on screen opposite Rosie Perez, Andre Royo (“The Wire”), Jaime Tirelli (“Girl Fight”) and onstage opposite Kathy Najimy, Billy Crudup, and Jason Biggs. Julia is a 2011 Fellow of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP), Latino Producers Academy and Latino Artist Mentoring Program. Julia holds a BA from Brown University and has studied acting with the Labyrinth Theater Company, Steppenwolf Theater Company and at Upright Citizen’s Brigade.

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