Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Race’ Category

Racism in Cuba

In 1959 there was a revolution in Cuba. Part of the promise was to abolish racial segregation and to provide jobs and education for Black Cubans. But ever since Cuba hit harsh economic times in the 1990’s, black Cubans have been experiencing more racial discrimination. In the second of his 3-part series on Cuba, correspondent Reese Erlich is in Havana to look into race in Cuba.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

The Haitian Immigrant Dilemma in the Dominican Republic

The countries of Haiti and the Dominican Republic share 30,000 square miles that make up the Island of Hispanola. And although their histories have been intertwined since colonial times, there are also considerable differences – cultural, racial, linguistic, and economic. The Dominican Republic has had a stable democratic government and has the second largest economy in the Caribbean, while Haiti is still lacking a comprehensive governmental structure and is one of the poorest countries in the world. Their histories also share deep conflicts marked with blood. In the 1800s, Haiti occupied the Dominican Republic for decades. Then in 1937 nearly 30,000 Haitians were massacred on the border during the military dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo.

But when a devastating earthquake shook Haiti on January 12, 2010, the Dominican Republic was one of the first countries to provide aid for their neighbor. Since then, thousands of Haitians have migrated to the Dominican Republic and many of them have been living there without documentation. Now, over a year later, the conflicts and cultural clashes have resurfaced. Since this January, nearly 6,000 Haitians have been deported to their native Haiti, which is still reeling — with a cholera epidemic, homelessness and electoral chaos. Human rights organizations now report race motivated attacks against Haitians living in the Dominican Republic. Maria Hinojosa traveled to the Island to report on what is happening there.

Produced by Xochitl Dorsey, Mixed and Engineered by Mincho Jacob, Edited by Maria Martin. Executive Producer Martha Spanninger.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Listen to Vanessa’s story, a five-month pregnant Haitian woman who lives undocumented in the Dominican Republic.
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A Latino USA Roundtable: Latinos and the Political Process

We’ve examined the rising importance of Latino candidates and voters in America, with an eye toward this year’s midterm elections. Now that the election has passed, we decided to narrow our focus a bit more and look at how Latinos can become a driving force in the politicial process, and how the Latino community can make its own voice heard instead of relying on others to relay the message.

Earlier this year, we interviewed longtime activist Rosie Castro in Texas. On this week’s program, we hear a bit of her interview with Maria Hinojosa. Latino USA also brought together three extremely bright minds to discuss the issues: Kai Wright, an editor at ColorLines Magazine, Lydia Camarillo, Vice President of the Southwest Voter Education Registration Project, and Luis Fraga, a Professor of Political Science at the University of Washington.

Their extended interview (presented here) lasts nearly an hour; a shorter version, edited to meet our broadcast requirements, can be heard using the audio player in the top right corner of this page.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

The Mayans of San Francisco: Navigating Three Worlds

In Mexico, the Yucatan Peninsula is home to a large Mayan population. And here in the United States, the San Francisco Bay Area has one of the largest Mayan populations in the nation. Monica Ortiz Uribe found out how Mayans hold onto their heritage while making a home for themselves in the San Francisco Bay area.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

SB 1070 Loses its Teeth

On Wednesday, June 28th, at the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona, Federal Judge Susan Bolton issued a preliminary injunction in the matter of “United States of America v. Arizona, State of, et al.” Four key provisions of Arizona’s harsh new immigration law, SB 1070, were put on hold:

Latino USA takes you to Phoenix to hear reaction on the ground: from activists, from politicians, and from average folks.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

On the day the injunction was handed down, Maria spoke with Professor Jenny Rivera of the CUNY Law School faculty, and the founder and director of the Center for Latino and Latina Rights and Equality. Here’s that conversation:


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

A note on how we produced this week’s program: A radio program like Latino USA is a collaborative effort. What you hear on the air is the work product of several journalists: reporters, producers, writers, editors, audio producers, web producers, photographers, and Maria, the host. Maria was not in Phoenix this week. But our Production Coordinator Nick Blumberg is, and it is his observations and conversations—his on-the-ground reporting and that of another reporter Valeria Fernandez—that informed what Maria says on the air.

In addition, and as you can see from one of the photos at the top of this page, Nick would find people for Maria to interview by phone, so that their interaction with one another could be part of this broadcast. Nick recorded the Phoenix side of the conversations. Mincho Jacob, another one of our radio producers, recorded Maria’s side of those phone calls. Then, we synchronize the two recordings and pulled sections of the composite interview to use on the air. We call this technique a “tape-sync” — and we use it often, in order to remove the phone line from the broadcast audio stream.

SB1070 and Jenny Rivera

PHOENIX – A Federal judge in Phoenix today blocked three of the most controversial sections of SB 1070, the law aimed at undocumented immigrants in Arizona.

Judge Susan Bolton, who was appointed to the Federal bench by President Clinton, ruled that the State of Arizona could not require law enforcement officers to check the immigration status of persons they stop for other reasons and whom they suspect are in the country illegally. Nor, the judge ordered, can Arizona require that individuals carry papers proving their immigration status. The law also would have made it illegal for undocumented people to seek employment in Arizona: that, too, was invalidated.

The law will go into effect on Thursday, but without three of the measures that most concerned civil libertarians.

Governor Jan Brewer (R) issued a statement saying she would appeal the ruling, adding “The fight is far from over.”

Maria Hinojosa talks with Professor Jenny Rivera of the CUNY Law School and the founder and director of the school’s Center on Latino and Latina Rights and Equality about today’s decision.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

The People in the Checkboxes

Right around three hundred nine million people. That’s the best guess at the moment of how many people live in the United States. The U.S. Census Bureau is busy trying to convince as many Americans as possible to return the questionnaire that has been mailed to every household in the country. It asks ten questions about everyone who lives in the home.

But, as Latino USA’s Yasmeen Qureshi reports from New York, it’s not a simple matter to get those questions answered.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Race & Ethnicity: No Easy Answers

Maria talks with Maria Teresa Kumar, the founding Executive Director of Voto Latino. The organization has been encouraging Latinos to participate in the Census in a number of ways, including a telenovela/PSA campaign called “Be Counted — Represent!”

The campaign targets young people in an effort to get them to talk with their parents about the Census. Voto Latino has been able to reach deep into some communities: using Latino/a celebrities and tools of social networking such as Twitter.

One of the persistent concerns has been the issue of immigration status: it’s taking some convincing to get undocumented immigrants to believe that the Census Bureau will not share information with ICE and other authorities concerned with immigration enforcement.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Watch an episode of the PSA/telenovela from Voto Latino.

Documenting Border Violence

In January of 2009, independent producer Scott Carrier produced a report for NPR’s Day-to-Day program (now defunct). In it, Scott followed around a Mexican photographer whose job it was to photograph gruesome drug-related murder scenes before the bodies were taken away to the local morgue. Most of the photos would appear in the next morning’s newspapers.

Here again is that broadcast.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

This story was part of Day to Day’s “Hearing Voices” series. CLICK HERE to link to the original broadcast dated January 5, 2009.

Web Extra – Latino Farmers v. USDA

In the landmark Pigford v. Glickman class action lawsuit, some 15,000 Black farmers sued the federal government for systematic discrimination when it game to allocating USDA farm loans vital to seasonal farmers. The government settled that suit for $1 Billion and are now looking for another $1.25 Billion to cover additional claimants.

But despite the fact that Latino farmers, especially in South Texas, faced very similar discrimination in the same loan program, a federal judge has ruled that the Latino farmers cannot be given class action status, severely complicating the case.

Reporter Wade Goodwyn reported this story recently for NPR.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Here is a link to his original story.

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