Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Civil Rights’ Category

Bracero Pay Day on Hold

While Congress debates provisions for a new guest worker program, elderly Mexican farmworkers called braceros protest about retirement money they say they’re owed. Mónica Ortiz Uribe reports.

Photo courtesy of Mónica Ortiz Uribe.


MonicaOrtizUribe1_t210Mónica Ortiz Uribe is a native of El Paso, Texas, where she recently worked as a freelance reporter. Her work has aired on NPR, Public Radio International and Radio Bilingue. Most of her stories examined the effects of drug-related violence across the border in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. Previously, she worked as a reporter for the Waco Tribune Herald in Waco, Texas. She graduated from the University of Texas at El Paso with a degree in history.

This Week’s Captions: For Bullets, It’s Open Borders

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we take you to Postville, Iowa, which five years ago was the site of the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Then, we look for answers on why U.S border patrol agents are shooting into Mexico and killing innocent civilians. And, we bring you a Mother’s Day commentary on the decision to become –or not to become– a mom. Finally, we go to a trailer park in Duroville, California where most its farmworker residents are leaving for newer housing.

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Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

POSTVILLE FIVE YEARS LATER

Five years ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents closed in on a kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa and carried out the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with filmmaker Luis Argueta, director of “Abused: the Postville Raid,” a documentary about the raid’s impact on immigrant families and on the town.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image: Abused Documentary Facebook.

Luis Argueta (photo by Bea Gallardo)Luis Argueta is a film director and producer whose work spans features, documentaries, shorts and episodic TV. He has also worked as commercial director, lecturer and teacher in the United States, Europe and throughout the Americas.  Born and raised in Guatemala, Argueta is a US Citizen and has been a resident of New York since 1977. His film The Silence of Neto is the only Guatemalan film ever to have been submitted to the Academy Awards competition and he is the only Guatemalan director to have received a CLIO. In April 2009, the British newspaper The Guardian, listed Mr. Argueta as one of Guatemala’s National Living Icons, alongside Nobel Laureate Rigoberta Menchu and Singer/Songwriter Ricardo Arjona.

 

This Week’s Captions: Mexico In The Spotlight

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, with U.S immigration reform talks underway, we look at Mexico and its place in the discussion. Then, a look at violence and human rights abuses in Mexico, where women are often targets. And a commentary from a Mexican-American in Mexico City, a pocho in chilangolandia. Finally, the San Francisco Girls’ Chorus premieres “Santos” in California.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Lost Women

Maria Hinojosa examines a pattern of violence and human rights abuses in Mexico. In the seven years since the Mexican government launched its war against the drug cartels, more than 60,000 people have been killed and an estimated 25,000 have disappeared.  Much of the violence comes from police and government forces as well as the cartels — and women are often targets.  Does Mexico’s new President, Enrique Peña Nieto have the will to curb the excesses?


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of oneinthreewomen.com.
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Mem.Photo_-copyMaría Emilia Martin is a pioneering public radio journalist with over two dozen awards for her work covering Latino issues and Latin America. She started her career at the first community public radio station owned and operated by Latinos in the U.S. She has developed ground-breaking programs and series for public radio, including NPR’s Latino USA, and Despues de las Guerras: Central America After the Wars. A recipient of Fulbright and Knight Fellowships, she has extensive experience in journalism and radio training, in the U.S., Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia and other countries.

This Week’s Captions: The Enforcement Taboo

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, where’s immigration enforcement in the ongoing conversation around reform? And, we speak to two key Latino congressmen shaping immigration legislation from inside the House. Finally, the winner of the 2012 Pulitzer for theater talks about the long shadow cast by war over a Puerto Rican family in Philadelphia.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

The Enforcement Taboo

From rallies in the Capitol, to acts of protest near the Texas/Mexico border, to a federal court room in New York, immigration activists give a final push to ensure that Congress delivers the long awaited bill reforming immigration policy and enforcement. María Hinojosa speaks to Juan Cartagena, president and general counsel of Latino Justice PRLDEF based in New York City.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the Wilson Center’s Mexican Institute.

juanJuan Cartagena is the president and general counsel for LatinoJustice PRLDEF. He is a constitutional and civil rights attorney with experience in employment rights, language rights, voting rights, public education financing, environmental law, housing and access to public hospitals.

IMMIGRATION TUMBLEWEEDS

Congress is headed for Easter recess. How close are we to seeing immigration reform legislation, and how are national and grassroots immigrant advocacy groups mobilizing to shape new policy? María Hinojosa speaks to Pilar Marrero, senior political writer at La Opinion, for an update.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of Flickr (Creative Commons)

PilarMarrero1Pilar Marrero is a journalist who for 25 years has extensively covered the areas of city government, immigration and state and national politics. She works for La Opinión as a senior reporter and it’s a regular commentator for radio and television in both spanish and english media. She´s the author of “El Despertar del Sueño Americano” published by Penguing Books and now on sale. The english version of the book, Killing the American Dream, comes out October 2 published by Pallgrave McMillan. Marrero lives in Los Angeles.

DOCUMENTED DRIVING

The Illinois legislature passed a law which will allow undocumented immigrants residing in the state to obtain driver’s licenses.  With this move, Illinois joins three other states — New Mexico, Washington and Utah that allow undocumented immigrants to drive legally. Dan Weissmann reports.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Dan Weissmann is a Chicago-based radio producer and multimedia reporter. His work has appeared regularly on WBEZ (Chicago Public Media, 91.5 FM) and can be found at www.danweissmann.com.

RACISM IN CUBA

Since 1959, the Cuban government has combatted racial discrimination. Officially all Cubans had the same opportunities.  But since the harsh economic times in the 1990s, black Cubans complain of increasing racial discrimination. Reese Erlich reports from Havana on this controversial issue.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Reese Erlich is a best-selling book author and freelance journalist who writes regularly for the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Radio, Marketplace Radio and National Public Radio.

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