Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Civil Rights’ Category

Private Prison Riot

One guard died and twenty people were injured in a riot at a privately run immigrant prison on May 21, raising more questions about how these prisons are run. We speak to David Fathi, the director of the American Civil Liberties Union National Prison Project for an overview on the private incarceration system.

Photo courtesy of: http://www.flickr.com/photos/710928003/1254166079/sizes/m/in/photostream/


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David Fathi is the Director of the American Civil Liberties Union National Prison Project. The ACLU project challenges to conditions of confinement in prisons, jails, and other detention facilities and works to end US overreliance on incarceration. From 2007 to 2010 he was Director of the US Program at Human Rights Watch, which works to defend the rights of particularly vulnerable groups in the United States.

Noticiando

Florida officials are purging non-citizen voters from their rolls less than six months before the presidential elections. Does this guard the ballot for eligible voters, or is it a way to keep Latinos, Blacks and Democrats from voting? For a closer look at Florida’s most recent voter measure, we talk to Myrna Perez, the Senior Counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University.

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Myrna Perez is a senior counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, a legal research and advocacy organization at New York University. She also works on a variety of voting rights related issues, including redistricting, voter registration list maintenance, and access to the ballot box. Before joining the center, Ms. Pérez was the Civil Rights Fellow at Relman & Dane, a civil rights law firm in Washington, D.C.

Noticiando

The federal immigration enforcement program called Secure Communities went into effect recently in New York, and under the program, information about people arrested by local police can be turned over to U.S. Immigration and potentially lead to their deportation. We speak to Lucía Gomez-Jimenez, the executive director of La Fuente’s New York and Long Island Civic Participation Project, an organization that focuses on immigrant and workers’ rights issues.

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Lucía Gomez-Jimenez is the executive director of La Fuente’s New York and Long Island Civic Participation Project, an organization that focuses on immigrant and worker rights issues. She was previously the Community Affairs representative for New York State Senator Gustavo Rivera and a Policy Fellow for the National Institute for Latino Policy (NILP) since 2009. She also served as the Assistant to the Governor for Community Affairs for Governor David Paterson of New York.

Precious Knowledge

The Mexican American Studies Program at a local high school in Tucson, Arizona helped increase the Latino graduation rate and the number of students who went to college. The recently banned program is now the subject of a new documentary, Precious Knowledge, to air next week on PBS. We speak to Eren Isabel McGinnis, the co-director of the film, and Alanna Castro, one of the students who took part in the program.

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Eren Isabel McGinnis has produced award-winning documentaries for PBS and other international media outlets for several years. She co-founded Caf Sisters Productions with Christine Fugate, an all-woman production company. She also co-founded Dos Vatos Productions with Ari Luis Palos.

Lesbian in Cuba after the revolution

After the 1959 revolution, being gay in Cuba was considered counter-revolutionary. LGBT Cubans were jailed and harassed because of their sexual identity. Hear from two lesbians talk about their life on the island since the Revolution.

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Von Diaz is a multimedia journalist based in New York City. Her reporting focuses on immigration, Cuba, and LGBT issues. She was born in Puerto Rico and raised in Atlanta, GA. She is a Feet in Two Worlds fellow, and has published her work on PRI’s The World, WNYC, and New American Media.

LA Beat: Covering the Riots

In 1992 Hector Tobar and Cheryl Devall covered the unrest after the Rodney King verdict from the Los Angeles streets. Both journalists discuss the racial and economic tensions in the city that sparked the unrest and how LA has changed since.


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Photo courtesy of http://www.neontommy.com/news/2012/04/la-riots-20th-anniversary-special-coverage


 

Cheryl Devall is a senior editor for Southern California Public Radio. She’s one of several responsible for supervising, editing and planning coverage with SCPR’s accomplished radio reporting staff. Cheryl brings to the task many years’ experience as an editor at public radio’s “Marketplace” and as a reporter – including 11 years with National Public Radio and with newspapers including the San Jose Mercury News, the Chicago Tribune and the Louisville Courier-Journal

Héctor Tobar is a Los Angeles author and journalist, whose work examines the evolving and interdependent relationship between Latin America and the United States.T obar is the author of The Tattooed Soldier, a novel set in the impoverished immigrant neighborhoods of Los Angeles in the weeks before the riots, and in Guatemala during the years of military dictatorship there. In 2006, Tobar was named one of the 100 Most Influential Hispanics in the United States by Hispanic Business magazine.

After the Fires: Community Perspectives

Hear community leaders’ reactions and reflections on this historic event. After the destruction, cleaning and rebuilding began in Los Angeles, and many different communities rallied to rebuild.


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Photo courtesy of http://www.edwardjamesolmos.com/

 

Yoon Hee Kim is an international tea educator, photographer, tea importer, chef and tea ceremony artist. Ms. Kim holds a B.A. from Smith College in Education with minors in Asian studies and Government, a M.A from Monterey Institute of International Studies in International Public Policy, and has done post-graduate studies in Public Administration and Business.
 

Joe R. Hicks, a member of the Project 21 black leadership network, is the vice president of Community Advocates, Inc. a privately-funded Los Angeles-based political think-tank.

 

Roberto Lovato is a writer and commentator at New America Media, a strategy consultant and a Co-Founder of Presente.org, the country’s pre-eminent online Latino advocacy organization, with a membership of over 250,000 people.

Supreme Court to rule on Arizona immigration law

Judgment day has arrived for Arizona’s restrictive immigration law, as the U.S Supreme Court hears arguments on April 25. The court will decide how much authority states can have when it comes to immigration enforcement. María Hinojosa speaks to NCLR’s Immigration Legislative Analyst, Laura Vasquez and Mark Krikorian, executive director at the Center for Immigration Studies, about what’s at stake in the hearings that begin April 25.


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Laura Vasquez is the Immigration Legislative Analyst at the National Council of La Raza in Washington, DC. Prior to joining NCLR, she was a Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Fellow and also a Constituent Caseworker for Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton.

 

Mark Krikorian has been the executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies in Washington, DC. since 1995. Before joining CIS, he held several editorial and writing positions. Krikorian has a master’s degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He authored “The New Case Against Immigration, Both Legal and Illegal.”

Voices from across the country weigh in on SB1070

As the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to evaluate Arizona’s SB1070, we speak to passersby in three different cities across the country to hear their thoughts on the long disputed immigration law.


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Operation Clean Halls

A police program in New York City allows landlords to give permission to the police to patrol the halls of their apartment buildings. Operation Clean Halls has operated since 1991 as part of the departments stop and frisk program.  Advocates of the program say it helps deter criminals, such as drug dealers, from operating inside the buildings.

But three civil rights organizations … the New York Civil Liberties Union, Latino Justice (PRLDEF) and the Bronx Defenders, have joined to file a federal class-action suit on behalf of tenants and their guests. They want the courts to modify what they say are unlawful practices used to enforce the program. . Maria Hinojosa talks about the suit with Juan Cartagena, president and general counsel for LatinoJustice PRLDEF, one of the organizations that filed the suit.

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Juan Cartagena

is the president and general counsel for LatinoJustice PRLDEF. He is a constitutional and civil rights attorney with experience in employment rights, language rights, voting rights, public education financing, environmental law, housing and access to public hospitals.

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