Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Health’ Category

This Week’s Captions: BUEN PROVECHO!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Latino USA delves into issues of food this week. We’ll take a look at the consequences of cuts to food stamps. We’ll express our love for plantains, tortillas, and breakfast tacos. We’ll hear from an undocumented Bay Area family that makes hundreds of tamales per week, get some reflection on food and health from performance artist Robert Karimi, and celebrate the Mexican heritage of huitlacoche. And Pauline Campos of Latina magazine joins Latino USA producer Brenda Salinas to dispense some advice.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Decolonize Your Tortilla!

Heads up, tortilla snobs! A pair of California professors behind the blog Decolonize Your Diet! show us how to make fresh homemade tortillas the traditional way. They’re not just tastier, they’re healthier.

Photo courtesy of Tena Rubio

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C1_Tena+Rubio+for+BioTena Rubio is an award-winning radio journalist based in San Francisco and Los Angeles. She’s a contributor to NPR’s Latino USA and is the former host & executive producer of the national public affairs show, Making Contact. A former TV news writer and producer, she is currently the Board Secretary for the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR).

 

C1_Tena+Rubio+for+Bio

Dr. Luz Calvo is an Associate Professor at California State University, East Bay
Dr. Catriona Rueda Esquibel is an Associate Professor, San Francisco State University

 

 

 

Sabiduría: Eating To Heal

The information we get from doctors around food and health can often be scary or off-putting. Robert Karimi, performing as Mero Cocinero, wants to bring together stories, culture and other recipes for good health. Are we to take what doctors tell us as gospel, or is it just another level of chisme? Karimi’s new performance project, Viva la Soul Power! is a pop up performance kitchen with delicious happenings all throughout Chicago to get people to reconnect to their cultures to promote well-being and counter Type 2 Diabetes and obesity. It has online and live events in Chicago throughout the month of October.

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Mero Cocinero Karimi is an Iranian-Guatemalan cook to revolutionaries & dreamers, and host of The Cooking Show con Karimi & Comrades, a live cooking performance for your heart, mind, stomach & funny bone. His role as an advocate for healthy communities through laughter & cooking has brought him to Alaska, Mexico, and everywhere in between. A frequent speaker on television shows & at universities, the Associated Press called his show ‘a globally flavored recipe that packs some punch lines.’

This Week’s Captions: ¡SALUD!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

¡Salud! This week Latino USA discusses questions of health. First, how stress and poverty can make you sick, and the latest on teen pregnancy. Then, Al Madrigal and Lalo Alcaraz talk Obamacare, and we check in with California, with stories of youth and rural health. Host Maria Hinojosa shares her newfound healthy enthusiasm for soccer, we hear about the wisdom of boxing, and we raise a glass to Latinos working in wine. All this, and social media reactions to the PBS “Latino Americans” series.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Stressing It

Science writer Moises Velasquez-Manoff discusses the relationship between poverty and stress. He talks about how this type of stress can have serious health consequences, and what this means for the Latino community.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons


A1MoisesVelasquezManoff_HeadshotMoises Velasquez-Manoff has written extensively, mostly on science and environment, for The Christian Science Monitor. His work has also appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Chicago Tribune, and the Indianapolis Star, among other publications. He holds a master of arts, with a concentration in science writing, from the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism.

 

Awareness, Access, and Advertisements

The good news: overall, teen pregnancy is down. The bad: Latinas are still getting pregnant at a higher rate than other teens. Latino USA’s Daisy Rosario reports on how public health campaigns are trying to combat teen pregnancy, and why critics of these ads view them as “shaming.”

Photo by Diana Montaño

YoungMamas-Nicole_Angresano

Nicole Angresano is the Vice President of Community Impact for United Way of Greater Milwaukee. She oversees more than 160 United Way-funded health and human service programs, as well as leading United Way’s communitywide teen pregnancy prevention efforts aimed at reducing Milwaukee’s rate of births to teens by 46% by 2015 – an issue that has been a focus for her since completing a graduate school thesis on the topic.

 

 

YoungMama-JessGonzalesRojas (1)

Jessica González-Rojas is the Executive Director at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, the only national reproductive justice organization that specifically works to advance reproductive health and rights for Latinas. Jessica is an Adjunct Professor of Latino and Latin American Studies at the City University of New York’s City College and has taught courses on reproductive rights, gender and sexuality.

 

 

 

A2_bill-profile-200x300Bill Albert is the Chief Program Officer of The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, a private, non-profit initiative organized in 1996 that focuses on preventing both teen pregnancy and unplanned pregnancy among single, young adults.  As Chief Program Officer, Mr. Albert is responsible for overall program planning and development, and for tracking program progress.

Drafting Rural Doctors

There is an increasing shortage of doctors in the rural communities of the San Joaquin Valley in California. Lisa Morehouse reports on a new program aimed at bringing new doctors to the area…and keeping them there.

Photo courtesy of  Lisa Morehouse

 

contributors1

Lisa-Morehouse-150x150 Lisa Morehouse is an award-winning independent public radio and print journalist, who’s filed for KQED’s The California Report, NPR’s Latino USA and All Things Considered, Edutopia magazine and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa.  She’s currently working on After The Gold Rush: The Future of Rural California, an audio documentary website and series. A former public school teacher, Morehouse also works with at-risk youth to produce radio diaries.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: In the Air, On the Air

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we go to California to find out how agricultural workers are protecting themselves from deadly heat. Then, we learn about how residents of Albuquerque are measuring pollution in the air. We explore what we mean when we discuss bias in the news media. And we hear from immigrants to the US who don’t want to become citizens.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

This Week’s Captions: For Bullets, It’s Open Borders

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we take you to Postville, Iowa, which five years ago was the site of the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Then, we look for answers on why U.S border patrol agents are shooting into Mexico and killing innocent civilians. And, we bring you a Mother’s Day commentary on the decision to become –or not to become– a mom. Finally, we go to a trailer park in Duroville, California where most its farmworker residents are leaving for newer housing.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

LAST DAYS OF DUROVILLE

Thousands of farmworker families in California’s eastern Coachella Valley live in mobile home parks. They’re cheap and convenient to the farms but many of them are in terrible conditions. One of them –Duroville– is closing by court order and most of its residents are moving into a new park built with county money allocated before major budget cuts. In the new budget reality, some advocates say don’t close the bad parks –let them stay open and renovate slowly. Lisa Morehouse reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Lisa Morehouse. 

Lisa-Morehouse-150x150Lisa Morehouse is an award-winning independent public radio and print journalist, who’s filed for KQED’s The California Report, NPR’s Latino USA and All Things Considered, Edutopia magazine and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa.  She’s currently working on After The Gold Rush: The Future of Rural California, an audio documentary website and series. A former public school teacher, Morehouse also works with at-risk youth to produce radio diaries.

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