Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Health’ Category

Living with Alzheimer’s: The Obando Family

As life expectancy increases and the U.S. population goes grayer, more people live longer with degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s. This disease is not just tragic, it’s fatal. Right now Alzheimer’s in the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S; it affects more than 5 million Americans, and it’s hitting Latino families with full force. In this piece, we examine the social and cultural factors that place special burdens on Latinos who are directly affected by Alzheimer’s. María Hinojosa spent time with the Obando family in Queens, New York to get a glimpse of what it’s like to live with Alzheimer’s. This story is produced by Nusha Balyan, edited by María Emilia Martin, and mixed by Jones Audio Productions. It’s part of a year-long series examining health issues facing Latinos. Latino USA’s year-long look at Latinos and Health is made possible by funding from Pfizer Helpful Answers®, a family of patient assistance programs for the uninsured and underinsured who need help getting Pfizer medicines.

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The Agonizing Wait For A Donor

For people suffering from blood related diseases, including Leukemia, a bone marrow transplant can be the cure.

The perfect matches come from relatives and one’s own ethnicity. But when it comes to life-saving bone marrow transplants, Latinos and other people of color have a much lower chance at finding a match. As part of our series examining health issues facing Latinos, this documentary produced by Habiba Nosheen and Lisa Desai, tells us what can be done to change things.

Latino USA’s year-long look at Latinos and Health is made possible by funding from Pfizer Helpful Answers®, a family of patient assistance programs for the uninsured and underinsured who need help getting Pfizer medicines.

Click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

YANIRA’S STORY

The numbers are shocking: one in seven Latinas in the U.S. will make an attempt to take her own life.

It’s not widely known or reported, but young Latinas attempt suicide at much higher rates than girls in other ethnic groups. Today on the program, we try to understand why. We have invited Dr. Luis Zayas to join us and to serve as our guide. Zayas teaches in Saint Louis, at both the School of Medicine at Washington University and at its School of Social Work, where he founded and directs the Center for Latino Family Research. It’s the only one of its kind in the nation: a social research center dedicated to Latino health, mental health, and family & community development in the U.S. and in Latin America.

But each story of a Latina teen suicide attempt is a deeply personal story. So, on today’s program we meet Yanira — a young Dominican-American who lives in Harlem and who has struggled with depression—and repression—for years. Yanira’s life is a contradiction: she’s forced to act like an adult, while being denied the permission to do things that many ordinary teenagers can do.

Reporter Laura Starecheski takes us inside her story.


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DR. LUIS ZAYAS

Dr. Luis Zayas is the Professor of Psychology at the Washington School of Medicine in Saint Louis and the founder and director of the Center for Latino Family Research at the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University.

Professor Zayas’ clinical experience spans 25 years of working with children, adolescents, adults, and families working in community mental health, psychiatric clinics, pediatric rehabilitation, and community-based primary care medicine.

Zayas has been treating girls like Yanira for years, and he says that her situation is all too common. He believes that many suicide attempts by young Latinas are not necessarily born out of an actual desire for death; rather, it’s how these girls communicate their distress, their insufficient emotional well-being, the lack of open communication with their parents.

Zayas has been conducting a study of Latina girls, their families, and suicide. It’s groundbreaking research and has led him to say that he believes the root of the issue is the family members’ concept of sexuality, and the perceived strain on familial cohesion posed by the desire for teenage autonomy.

Listen to his extended interview with Maria.


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Dr. Pedro Noguera

A growing rate of HIV/AIDS, low wages, and an ever-increasing incarceration rate are just some of the rampant challenges for Latino men. But if these issues are so important, why is there such little discussion among academics and policy makers? María Hinojosa talks to Dr. Pedro Noguera to find out. He’s a professor at New York University and co-editor of “Invisible No More: Understanding the Disenfranchisement of Latino Men and Boys.”

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Young Men’s Clinic

The Young Men’s Clinic (YMC) in Washington Heights is one of the first clinics of its kind, focusing exclusively on males between the ages of 13 and 35 years old. Led by Medical Director, Dr. David Bell, the YMC works to treat and educate predominately young Latino men about their physical, mental and emotional health.

This story is produced by Whitney Eulich and edited by María Emilia Martin. It’s part of a year-long series examining health issues facing Latinos. Male sexual health is openly discussed in this piece.

Latino USA’s year-long look at Latinos and Health is made possible by funding from Pfizer Helpful Answers®, a family of patient assistance programs for the uninsured and underinsured who need help getting Pfizer medicines.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Curandero

We go to the San Francisco Bay Area to meet Charles Garcia, founder of the California School of Traditional Hispanic Herbalism. Garcia is a third generation curandero, a traditional healer. He treats the sick with tinctures, vinegars, and other concoctions made of plants, many of which he grows or harvests in the outdoors.

Reporter Lisa Morehouse tagged along with Garcia to find out what it’s all about.

Our series RadioNature is funded by the REI Foundation.

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Becoming Dr. Q

When you think of an experienced and accomplished neurosurgeon, you wouldn’t imagine an undocumented farm worker. That may change after listening to Dr. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa’s inspirational story. An award-winning brain surgeon, who is working on finding a cure for brain cancer, he is one of the health heroes we profile as part of our year-long series on Latinos and health.

Dr. Q., as his colleagues call him, teaches oncology and neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and runs a laboratory studying brain tumors. But before he started saving lives, he was an undocumented immigrant, working in the fields of California’s Central Valley. He tells it all in his new book “Becoming Dr. Q: My Journey from Migrant Farm Worker to Brain Surgeon.” And he also shares his story in a candid interview with Maria Hinojosa.

Latino USA’s year-long look at Latinos and Health is made possible by funding from Pfizer Helpful Answers®, a family of patient assistance programs for the uninsured and underinsured who need help getting Pfizer medicines.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Instituto Familiar de la Raza

For many Latinos, mental health was once a taboo subject. But in the 1970’s, Dr. Concha Saucedo Martinez did her part to change that by founding the Instituto Familiar de la Raza in San Francisco’s Mission District. Dr. Saucedo revolutionized mental health practices by providing her clients with spiritual and culturally sensitive workshops and services. More importantly, she made therapy and psychiatric care more accessible and affordable to the Latino community in San Francisco.

Reporter Robynn Takayama profiles Dr. Concha Saucedo Martinez, as part of our series on Latinos and health.

Latino USA’s year-long look at Latinos and Health is made possible by funding from Pfizer Helpful Answers®, a family of patient assistance programs for the uninsured and underinsured who need help getting Pfizer medicines.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Along for the Ride with Damian Lopez Alfonso

Cycling is Damian Lopez Alfonso’s life. Since he was a young boy, he’s been riding the streets of Havana, Cuba… but not just for fun. He’s actually a fierce and competitive cyclist. But Damian doesn’t look or ride like your average competitive racer. We met up with him in an unlikely space in New York City.
Radio story and slide-show produced by Xohitl Dorsey.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

If you’d like to help Damian Lopez Alfonso get to the London Para-Olympics in 2012, go to PayPal and make your donation to teamdamian2012@gmail.com.

Gifts can also be made in Damian’s name at the Achilles Foundation for Facial Reconstruction or the National Foundation for Facial Reconstruction.

To download an .mp3 of the 30-minute program, subscribe to the podcast at NPR or iTunes.

 

Radio Nature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI foundation.

The REI Foundation focuses on supporting efforts to get more young people, including youth from diverse populations, into nature. Through this work, The REI Foundation’s goal is to help inspire the next generation of outdoor enthusiasts and environmental stewards.

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