Archive for the ‘Social Justice’ Category

After the Fires: Community Perspectives

Hear community leaders’ reactions and reflections on this historic event. After the destruction, cleaning and rebuilding began in Los Angeles, and many different communities rallied to rebuild.


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Photo courtesy of http://www.edwardjamesolmos.com/

 

Yoon Hee Kim is an international tea educator, photographer, tea importer, chef and tea ceremony artist. Ms. Kim holds a B.A. from Smith College in Education with minors in Asian studies and Government, a M.A from Monterey Institute of International Studies in International Public Policy, and has done post-graduate studies in Public Administration and Business.
 

Joe R. Hicks, a member of the Project 21 black leadership network, is the vice president of Community Advocates, Inc. a privately-funded Los Angeles-based political think-tank.

 

Roberto Lovato is a writer and commentator at New America Media, a strategy consultant and a Co-Founder of Presente.org, the country’s pre-eminent online Latino advocacy organization, with a membership of over 250,000 people.

Supreme Court to rule on Arizona immigration law

Judgment day has arrived for Arizona’s restrictive immigration law, as the U.S Supreme Court hears arguments on April 25. The court will decide how much authority states can have when it comes to immigration enforcement. María Hinojosa speaks to NCLR’s Immigration Legislative Analyst, Laura Vasquez and Mark Krikorian, executive director at the Center for Immigration Studies, about what’s at stake in the hearings that begin April 25.


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Laura Vasquez is the Immigration Legislative Analyst at the National Council of La Raza in Washington, DC. Prior to joining NCLR, she was a Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Fellow and also a Constituent Caseworker for Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton.

 

Mark Krikorian has been the executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies in Washington, DC. since 1995. Before joining CIS, he held several editorial and writing positions. Krikorian has a master’s degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He authored “The New Case Against Immigration, Both Legal and Illegal.”

Voices from across the country weigh in on SB1070

As the U.S. Supreme Court prepares to evaluate Arizona’s SB1070, we speak to passersby in three different cities across the country to hear their thoughts on the long disputed immigration law.


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Operation Clean Halls

A police program in New York City allows landlords to give permission to the police to patrol the halls of their apartment buildings. Operation Clean Halls has operated since 1991 as part of the departments stop and frisk program.  Advocates of the program say it helps deter criminals, such as drug dealers, from operating inside the buildings.

But three civil rights organizations … the New York Civil Liberties Union, Latino Justice (PRLDEF) and the Bronx Defenders, have joined to file a federal class-action suit on behalf of tenants and their guests. They want the courts to modify what they say are unlawful practices used to enforce the program. . Maria Hinojosa talks about the suit with Juan Cartagena, president and general counsel for LatinoJustice PRLDEF, one of the organizations that filed the suit.

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Juan Cartagena

is the president and general counsel for LatinoJustice PRLDEF. He is a constitutional and civil rights attorney with experience in employment rights, language rights, voting rights, public education financing, environmental law, housing and access to public hospitals.

The Evolving Occupy Wall Street

The “Occupy” movement has been steadily growing and has spread throughout the US and abroad. This week, we take a closer look at Latinos participating throughout the United States and the messages they want to convey. We start at Zuccotti Park with Marine Perez, who has been with the movement from the very beginning. She is an activist and translator, originally from Puerto Rico, and now, she is the language coordinator of the “Occupy Wall Street Journal.” We are also joined by activists: John Michael Torres from McAllen, TX, Marissa Martinez from LA, and Judith Marquez from Denver.

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“Lost in Detention” Special Preview

Immigration has been a key issue across the political arena, but despite all the promises, the prospects for comprehensive immigration reform are scarce. Last year, President Obama’s administration set a new record for detaining and deporting undocumented immigrants under the Secure Communities enforcement program. The program was set up to target and deport dangerous criminal immigrants, but has that always been the case? In her upcoming FRONTLINE documentary “Lost in Detention,” Maria Hinojosa takes an in-depth look at the enforcement of the Secure Communities program, and explores the hidden world of immigration detention. What she and the FRONTLINE Investigative team found, is shocking and unimaginable. And we have a special preview on Latino USA. Watch the one-hour FRONTLINE documentary “Lost in Detention” on October 18th at 9pm on PBS.


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Searching the Past for Evidence

Paul Bieber is a private investigator and law student in California. He has an abiding interest in the investigation of instances of human rights abuses. This summer, he went to Colombia on a 10-day fact-finding mission organized by Witness for Peace, the social justice organization based in Washington, D.C.

With the help of veteran public radio producer Jay Allison and the Peabody-winning website Transom.org, Bieber also is making his first foray into radio storytelling. We’re pleased to be the first to air the result for a national audience, with his piece Scene of the Crime.

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You’ll find more information on Paul Bieber’s work in Colombia at the Transom.org website.

In Los Angeles, Protests of LAPD Shooting of Day Laborer

The killing of Manuel Jamines, on Sunday 5 September, by an officer of the Los Angeles Police Department sparked several protests throughout the week. Jamines, an immigrant from Guatemala, was working as a day laborer. Frank Stoltze of Southern California Public Radio has this report.


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Dolores at 80

Dolores Huerta. The woman behind some of the most important huelgas America has ever seen. At 80, the legendary activist is no little old lady — she’s a force to be reckoned with. Co-founder of the United Farm Workers, now leader of the Dolores Huerta Foundation, she’s championed dozens of civil and human rights causes alongside some of the most prominent people of the 20th and 21st centuries… and she has no intention of stopping anytime soon.

She sat down and talked with Maria Hinojosa about her work and her life.


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Special thanks to WGBH Boston for the audio of Maria and Dolores’s conversation. Find out more about WGBH’s One on One with Maria Hinojosa. And thanks to Marcos Najera for audio from the 80th birthday celebration.

Dolores Huerta Timeline

See some of the moments from Dolores Huerta’s life as she describes, in her own words, how she got involved in community organizing.

Just Associates

In the days before the coup in Honduras that forced President Manuel Zelaya out of the country in his pajamas on June 28, 2009, several women’s rights organizations had been organizing for constitutional reforms. Within hours of the coup, these same organizations quickly took to the streets, calling on the de facto government to respect the country’s constitution and democratic institutions. According to leaders within these groups, many protestors were met with repressive tactics by police and military and these human rights violations have not been addressed.

Lisa Veneklasen is the founder and executive director of Just Associates (JASS), an international organization supporting women’s rights advocacy and political organizing in 30 countries in Southeast Asia, Southern Africa, and Mesoamerica. Veneklasen says many of the human rights groups in Honduras continue to look to the Obama Administration to support their pro-democracy stance and to pressure the Honduran government to investigate and prosecute human rights abuses.

Listen to the EXTENDED CONVERSATION:


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Constitution on ICE

In order for law enforcement agents to enter private homes, specific legal provisions must be met. The most common tool used by police is that of a warrant issued by a judge. Normally, the warrant is for the arrest of a specific person at a local address. A search warrant requires even stricter legal guidelines. And police also respond to public complaints at private residences. And if they have reason to believe a crime is being committed, law enforcement have some authority to enter private residences without a warrant.

Prof. Peter Markowitz

Confusing? Perhaps the most important thing about all the rules is the idea that law enforcement can’t randomly come into a private residence looking for crime or people to arrest. This was the impetus for a Freedom of Information Act filed against Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) by legal academics at the Benjamin Cardoza School of Law in New York. This FOIA request documented a pattern of illegal entrances into private homes by ICE agents.

Latino USA’s Katie Davis reports.


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Identification in New Haven

Fr. James Winship. (Photo courtesy of New Haven Independent. Used with permission.)

New Haven, Connecticut is a sanctuary city. In 2007, the town voted to allow municipal IDs for all its residents regardless of immigration status. This caught the attention of anti-immigrant activists, who decried this de-facto legalization that allowed undocumented persons to open bank accounts and get access to city services. And yet not all is peaceful in New Haven.

For some time, the town’s Latino immigrants have claimed harassment by local police. And recently, a catholic priest was arrested and charged with interfering with an officer in the performance of his duties. And what was the priest doing? He was videotaping police officers as they hassled a Latino small business owner.

Aswini Anburajan, a reporter with the Feet in Two Worlds Project, has a profile of this activist priest: Fr. James Manship.


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See Aswini Anburajan’s reporters notebook on her profile of Fr. James Manship from the Feet in Two Worlds website.

Click HERE.

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