Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Social Justice’ Category

THE PRICE OF BURIALS

Many families of immigrants who die in the US shoulder the burden and cost of shipping the remains of their loved ones back to the countries where they were born. Lauren Silverman reports that the costs of repatriation can run as high as $10,000.


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Lauren Silverman is a bilingual reporter and radio producer at National Public Radio in Washington D.C. She received the Gracie Allen Award from American Women in Radio and Television in 2005. She worked as a reporter at Michigan Radio while studying political science and Latin American studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has written and recorded pieces for American Public Media’s Marketplace, as well as National Public Radio’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Among the pieces she has reported and produced are stories on the artifacts left behind by undocumented migrants crossing the Sonoran desert; the changing face of America’s Chinatowns; and the transformation of a historic neighborhood in Compton, CA.

Noticiando: Peace Passage

Since poet and writer Javier Sicilia’s 24-year-old son was killed by Mexican drug cartels last year, he has worked to end the violence that has already claimed tens of thousands of victims since 2006. He is leading a Caravan for Peace from San Diego to Washington, DC to raise awareness about the victims of the drug war affecting Mexico and the U.S. We speak to Pepe Rivera, one of the organizers of the caravan.

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José -Pepe- Rivera is a coordinator of the Documentation Commission of the Movement for Peace with Justice & Dignity, where he documents victims of the war on drugs and prohibition. He is also a coordinator for the Communications Commission for Caravan for Peace. He is a documentary photographer and consultant, and he has worked for the International Federation of the Red Cross and the Mexican United Nations Association.

Surviving Torture: the Super Marios Story

The Kovler Center in Chicago was designed to help victims of torture overcome their turbulent experiences. As part of our year-long series about Latinos in health, reporter Dan Weissman brings us the story of one of the people who received treatment there and the doctor who helped him.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of Hektoen International.

Dan Weissmann is a Chicago-based radio producer and multimedia reporter. His work has appeared regularly on WBEZ (Chicago Public Media, 91.5 FM) and can be found at www.danweissmann.com.

Infiltrating Broward

For most people who are undocumented, being detained by immigration officials is probably their biggest fear. But that’s not the case for a young group of undocumented activists who infiltrated a Florida detention center to find low priority detainees, one year since the ICE memo calling for prosecutorial discretion.

Some of the audio in this piece was provided by Alex Rivera who has been working on a documentary following the activists.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Flickr.

 

 

Car Wash Wage Theft

Big city carwash workers often work long hours for little pay with few protections from chemicals.  State prosecutors are now investigating and punishing abusive employers, and a new campaign by community organizations is encouraging workers to demand respect for their rights.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Wash New York.

Andrés Caballero has been an active contributor to Latino USA for more than a year. He holds a M.S. in Journalism from the Columbia University School of Journalism, and a B.S. in Political Science from Notre Dame De Namur University. He covers issues that affect Latinos across the U.S., and he has also contributed to New America Media, the Hispanic Link News Service in Washington D.C., and El Tecolote in San Francisco.

Noticiando: Deportations and Adoption

In 2007, Guatemalan immigrant Encarnacion Bail Romero was detained at an immigration raid where she worked. By the time she was released, her six-month-old U.S.-born son was handed to another family for adoption, and his name was changed from Carlos to Jameson against her will. For more on Romero’s fight for her child’s custody, we speak to Michelle Brané, the Director of Detention and Asylum at the Women’s Refugee Commission.


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Michelle Brané is one of the nation’s foremost experts on U.S. immigration detention and reform. She is the Director of the Detention and Asylum program at the Women’s Refugee Commission, and she advocates for the critical protection needs of immigrant women, children and other vulnerable migrant populations in the United States. She authored the 2007 Women’s Refugee Commission landmark report on family detention, Locking Up Family Values and the 2009 report on unaccompanied migrant children, Halfway Home, and is the senior editor of all the Detention and Asylum Program’s reports. Ms. Brané is an attorney with more than 25 years of experience working on immigration and human rights issues.

Noticiando: Violence in Anaheim, California

After police shot 24-year-old Manuel Diaz while running away unarmed on July 21, neighbors in Anaheim, California began to challenge police for overuse of force.  In response, police fired weapons at the angry residents, and unleashed a dog that charged a man who was on the floor next to a woman and child on a stroller. Several people were injured. For more about what led to this confrontation, we speak to Gustavo Arellano, the editor of the alternative newspaper the OC Weekly. 


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Gustavo Arellano is editor of the OC Weekly, an alternative newspaper in California. Gustavo also writes “¡Ask a Mexican!,” a nationally syndicated and award-winning column. His most recent book is “Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America.”

DREAMERS AWAKEN

We speak to three self-styled “dreamers” about their hopes and fears just after President Obama announced an executive order that would halt the deportations of some young undocumented people.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photo: http://action.dreamactivist.org/

 

Prerna Lal is a student at The George Washington University Law School. She is the co-founder of DreamActivist.Org, and she also serves as a board member for Immigration Equality, an organization that advocates for the rights of LGBT immigrants.

 

Mohammad Abdollahi is originally from Iran. He came to the U.S. when he was three and became undocumented after en error in his paperwork process. He is one of the founders of National Immigrant Youth Alliance. He was also arrested in 2010 while protesting for passage of the DREAM Act at the Tucson offices of Sen. John McCain.

 

Lizbeth Mateo is originally from Oaxaca, Mexico. She grew up in Los Angeles where she went to school and became the first in her family to graduate from Cal State University, Northridge. Lizbeth is co-founder of DreamActivist California and The National Immigrant Youth Alliance – an undocumented youth-LED network of grassroots organizations, campus-based student groups and individuals committed to achieving equality for all immigrant youth, regardless of their legal status.

What’s Next?

The devil is in the details. We look into implementation and politics in the wake of Obama’s executive order allowing young people to stay and work legally in the U.S. We speak to lawyer and immigration columnist Allan Wernick about who is affected, who should apply and what to watch out for. And for a picture of the political landscape, we talk to Pulitzer prize-winning journalist and DREAMer Jose Antonio Vargas.


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Allan Wernick is a professor at Baruch College and he is the director of Citizen Now program at the City University of New York. He is a published author on U.S. immigration and citizenship issues and he is also a columnist for the New York Daily News and King Features Syndicate.

 

Jose Antonio Vargas is an award-winning journalist who has worked for The San Francisco Chronicle, The Philadelphia News, The Washington Post and the Huffington Post. Born in the Philippines, Vargas moved to the United States at a young age. His experience as an undocumented immigrant has influenced many aspects of his work. In 2008, Vargas and his team won the Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Reporting. Most recently, Vargas’ story, “Not Legal, not leaving,” appeared on the cover of Time Magazine.

Vicki the Crime Fighter

For Vickie Cruz, coming out as a trans young woman in the 1960s meant learning to defend herself physically and emotionally. But with the support of her large Puerto Rican family, she used her experiences to help victims of sexual and domestic violence, earning her a Crime Victims Service Award this year from the U.S. Attorney General’s office. Von Diaz reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Merel van Beeren.

Von Diaz is a multimedia journalist based in New York City. Her reporting focuses on immigration, Cuba, and LGBT issues. She was born in Puerto Rico and raised in Atlanta, GA. She is a Feet in Two Worlds fellow, and has published her work on PRI’s The World, WNYC, and New American Media.

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