Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Somos’ Category

Somos Nativos

To start this week’s show on what it means to be indigenous, we went right to the source. We spoke to three people from three different Native American tribes about issues facing their communities. All three currently reside on reservations.

 

Lauren Chief Elk , Ruth Hopkins, and Gyasi Ross are all outspoken on a number of issues facing their communities, such as violence against indigenous women, high unemployment and suicide rates, and what it feels like to constantly witness careless cultural appropriation in the mainstream media.

 

These conversations offer just a small insight about the ongoing problems facing Natives both on and off reservations. They also show the just a bit of the passion that these writers and activists have for their cultures.

The extended version of this segment will be available shortly.

 

 

 

RuthHopkins

Ruth Hopkins is a Native American (Dakota and Lakota Sioux) writer, blogger, biologist and Judge. She is a columnist for Indian Country Today Media Network and one of the founding writers of Lastrealindians.com. She is also a contributor to Truthout.org, BKNation.org, Jezebel.com, Counterpunch.org, Racialicious.com, and has been published by dozens of other sites online as well as in print. Find her on Twitter @RuthHopkins.

 

 

LaurenChiefElk

Lauren Chief Elk is the co-founder of the Save Wiyabi Project, an advocacy group relating to violence against Native American Women. She is also very active on twitter, where you can follow her @ChiefElk

 

 

 

 

 

GyasiRossGyasi Ross is an attorney, writer and member of the Blackfeet Nation/Suquamish Nation. His new book, “How to Say I love You in Indian,” is available now.

This Week’s Captions: LATINA ARTISTS

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

In our final archive special for the month of August, we hear from three Latinas about their lives and creativity. Actress Salma Hayek talks to Maria Hinojosa about playing artist Frida Kahlo. Actress Rosie Perez discusses her Brooklyn roots and rise to fame. And we hear from Julieta Venegas about her influences and early career. Finally, a piece from 1993 asks that perpetual question: how do you identify yourself?

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Somos: Who We Are (1993)

As Latinos, our Spanish heritage binds us, but ancestry from far flung corners of the world divides us. In this special piece on identity from 1993, we explore what that unity—and diversity—means.

Photo courtesy of Flickr

This Week’s Captions: IMMIGRATION & DOMA

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, Latino USA takes a look at the recent Supreme Court ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act and what it means for immigrant same-sex couples. Then, we explore the identity of people who are both Muslim and Latino. We’ll take a trip to Brazil to hear the accordion dance music known as forró. And Host Maria Hinojosa takes an Independence Day look at Lady Liberty’s immigration status.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Somos Muslims

As we approach the start of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, we explore the intersection of Muslim and Latino identities as part of our series on identity, Somos—Who We Are. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Hazel Gomez, a community organizer, Hamza Perez, an activist, and Wilfredo Amr Ruiz, an attorney and Muslim Chaplain.

 

And listen to the extended interview below:


 

 

Image Credit: Flickr

Hazel Gomez has worked as a community organizer for the last three years focusing on immigration reform, criminal justice reform, and the intersection between the two. Hazel is the daughter of Puerto Rican and Mexican parents and is committed to seeing the growth and deepening of Islam within Latino American communities. In the ever-growing mosaic of Islam in America, she is interested in the creation of an authentic Latino Muslim experience. She considers herself an active student of knowledge, having intermittently studied under some of the West’s most prominent and learned scholars, and currently exploring traditional paths of Islamic knowledge. She graduated from Loyola University Chicago with a B.S. in Forensic Science and two minors in Chemistry and Psychology of Crime and Justice.

Hamza Perez is the founder of the S.H.E.H.U. Program (Services Helping to Empower and Heal Urban Communities) and one of the co-founders of the Light of the Age Mosque in Pittsburgh PA. Hamza Perez was also ranked one of the top 500 most influential muslims in the world in 2010 by The Royal Islamic Strategic Studies Centre for his work with youth. In 2009 PBS released an award winning film titled “New Muslim Cool” about the life of Hamza Perez, his music and his community.

Wilfredo Amr Ruiz is also a Muslim Chaplain and Political Analyst on the Middle East and Muslim World. He is a regular columnist at various newspapers and electronic media outlets in New York, Puerto Rico and Spain. Attorney Ruiz is presently a Civil Rights Counsel for the Council of American Islamic Relations (CAIR Florida) and he is regularly interviewed and consulted at national and international media outlets on diverse issues on politics of the Middle East and the Muslim World, Islam and Christian-Muslim relations.

SOMOS: HOW AMERICAN ARE PUERTO RICANS?

Puerto Ricans are U.S. citizens but are often made to feel like outsiders. And those residing on the island see their identity differently from those living in the U.S. mainland. The future of the island’s political relation to the U.S. is still in question, but many feel their cultural identity as Puerto Rican first. Part of our regular series of conversations on Latino identity, Somos/We Are.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Explaining Somos

“Somos” is the name of a series that we are starting where we explore issues of Latino identity. We invite you to tell us how you identify yourself by making a video on youtube, posting a comment here, or leaving a message old-school style on our phone (yes, we have a phone attached to a wall!) at 646-571-1228. Don’t forget to tell us your name and where you’re calling us from. And after you post your video, tell us about it here or tweet us! We love hearing from you.

Alejandro Arbona is a freelance writer, editor, and brand research consultant based in New York City. He was born and raised in San Juan, Puerto Rico, where people were constantly under the impression he was an American tourist. As an editor for five years at Marvel Entertainment, Alejandro oversaw, among other things, a series of “Fantastic Four” comic books set in Puerto Rico, prominently featuring Old San Juan, the rainforest of El Yunque, the bioluminescent bay of Vieques, and el chupacabras.

 

Frances Negrón-Muntaner is a filmmaker, writer, and scholar, as well as the director of Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race. Among her books are Boricua Pop: Puerto Ricans and the Latinization of American Culture (CHOICE Award, 2004) and Sovereign Acts (South End Press, 2010). Her films include AIDS in the Barrio (Gold Award at the John Muir Film Festival, 1989), Brincando el charco: Portrait of a Puerto Rican (Whitney Biennial, 1995), and the upcoming television show, War in Guam. Negrón-Muntaner is also a founding board member and past chair of NALIP, National Association of Latino Independent Producers. In 2005, she was named one of the most influential Hispanics by Hispanic Business Magazine, and in 2008, the United Nations’ Rapid Response Media Mechanism recognized her as a global expert in the areas of mass media and Latin/o American studies. Most recently, El Diario/La Prensa selected her as one of the 2010 recipients of their annual “Distinguished Women Award.”

Ray Suarez joined The NewsHour in October 1999 as a Washington-based Senior Correspondent. Suarez has more than thirty years of varied experience in the news business. He came to The NewsHour from National Public Radio where he had been host of the nationwide, call-in news program “Talk of the Nation” since 1993. Prior to that, he spent seven years covering local, national, and international stories for the NBC-owned station, WMAQ-TV in Chicago. He is the author most recently of a book examining the tightening relationship between religion and politics in America, The Holy Vote: The Politics of Faith in America.  Suarez currently hosts the monthly radio program “America Abroad” for Public Radio International, and the weekly politics program “Destination Casa Blanca” for Hispanic Information Telecommunications Network, HITN TV. Suarez was a co-recipient of NPR’s 1993-94 and 1994-95 duPont-Columbia Silver Baton Awards for on-site coverage of the first all-race elections in South Africa and the first 100 days of the 104th Congress, respectively. He was honored with the 1996 Ruben Salazar Award from the National Council of La Raza, and the 2005 Distinguished Policy Leadership Award from UCLA’s School of Public Policy. The Holy Vote won a 2007 Latino Book Award for Best Religion Book.

SOMOS: HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept. 15-Oct. 15, is supposed to be a time to celebrate Latino contributions to U.S. society and culture. But for some, it feels like a way to sanitize Latino history in the U.S. Or worse, just another excuse to market to Latinos. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with Prof. Arlene Dávila and humorist Lalo Alcaraz about the uses and meanings of Hispanic Heritage Month.

This is part of our series on Latino identity, “Somos.”


Click here to download this week’s show.

Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border. He is married to a hard-working public school teacher and they have three extremely artistic children.

 

Arlene Davila is a professor of Anthropology, Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. She is the author of Sponsored Identities: Cultural Politics in Puerto Rico and Latinos Inc: Marketing and the Making of a People, Barrio Dreams: Puerto Ricans, Latinos and the Neoliberal City. Her book, Latino Spin: Public Image and the Whitewashing of Race recently received the Latin American Studies Association prize for the best book in Latino studies.

Somos: What’s In A Name?

Latino, Afro-Cuban, Chicano, Mexican-American:  For as long as people of Latin American descent have been a part of the U.S. they’ve been referred to by many names. What’s more, we even have different names for ourselves. In this segment of our new Somos series, we talk to writers and activists about what name they choose to identify themselves by – and why it matters.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of jeremystatton.com.

Explaining Somos

“Somos” is the name of a series that we are starting where we explore issues of Latino identity. We invite you to tell us how you identify yourself by making a video on youtube, posting a comment here, or leaving a message old-school style on our phone (yes, we have a phone attached to a wall!) at 646-571-1228. Don’t forget to tell us your name and where you’re calling us from. And after you post your video, tell us about it here or tweet us! We love hearing from you.

Marina Garcia-Vasquez is the co-founder and director of MexntheCity.com, a culture site and creative consultancy collective. The group aims to promote Mexican culture and heritage in a positive light through the accomplishments of Mexican nationals and Mexican-Americans both in the United States, Mexico, and globally. Based in New York City, Marina is a working journalist dedicated to writing about art, design, and architecture. She is a recent graduate of Columbia University’s School of Journalism M.A. program in Arts and Culture and a published poet.

Roland Roebuck is a recognized DC activist nationally known as a leading spokesperson on issues that impact Latino Afro-Descendants. He has worked tirelessly to champion human and civil rights. He is a founding member of several Washington DC community organizations and has compelled national organizations and elected officials to implement initiatives that address the needs of minority groups.

 

Matthew Yglesias is Slate’s business and economics correspondent and author of Slate’s Moneybox column. Before joining the magazine he worked for ThinkProgress, the Atlantic, TPM Media, and the American Prospect. His first book, Heads in the Sand, was published in 2008. His second, The Rent Is Too Damn High, was published in March.

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