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Archive for the ‘Young Voices’ Category

Catching Up With The Stem Sisters

In the last few years theres been a big push on the importance of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) education and careers.

As part of our first hour long episode in September we introduced you to four Latinas we dubbed the STEM Sisters. Alma, Marcela, Sonia, and Xochyl met at DePaul University in Chicago while getting degrees in environmental studies. They noticed each other over their years at college because they were the only Latinas in their classes.

When we first spoke with them they had just graduated and were figuring out what to do next. Now a few months later, we talk to three of the STEM sisters about looking for work, trying to figure out how to start STEM careers, and looking forward to 2014.

Photo by Keystone Features/Getty Images


Ecuador-via-Florida musician Roberto Carlos Lange, aka Helado Negro, just released his latest record Invisible Life. Hear about his family life, musical philosophy, and meanings behind the new tunes in his own words.

Click here to download this week’s show. 

HeladoNegroHeadshot From the room he grew up in, in South Florida, to his apartment in Savannah, where that restless tropical silent partner, humidity, continued to creep in, and now in his current home in Brooklyn – Roberto Lange of Helado Negro has never not made music. Tones whittled out of these places, memories, time and all its impressions, Invisible Life is Helado Negro’s third full-length album. Like captured light, it is a reflection of Helado Negro’s refined love affair with synthesis, sampling, and his own strengthening voice.


The Upper Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights has long been home to the country’s largest Dominican-American community. Now it’s also home to a new reality show produced by MTV. We speak with a group of young Washington Heights residents about how the show represents their ‘hood.

Click here to download this week’s show

The following people graciously sat down with us to watch Washington Heights and give us their opinion:

Dr. Cyrus Boquín





Cynthia Carrion







John Paul Infante


While the hip hop movement in Cuba has been developing for many years, women rappers have struggled to make inroads. One of the few to break through has been Telmary Diaz. Though she now lives outside of the island, her music focuses on her experiences as a Cuban woman.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Telmary Diaz, better known as Telmary, is an award-winning Toronto-based Cuban rapper, musician, and spoken-word artist. In 2007 she released her first solo album A Diario to rave reviews. She made her film debut in “Todas las noches terminan en el Malecon” by Cecilia Araujo (Brazil 2001), and her feature debut in “Musica Cubana” by German Krall (2004). She has also worked to the 2005 Spanish film “Habana Blues” by Benito Zambrano, and contributed the soundtrack of the 2002 Italian film “MalaHabana” by Guido Giansoldatti.

Let’s Talk About Sex

Teens in the Bronx have higher rates of sexually transmitted illnesses and pregnancy than their counterparts in other zones but they’re using condoms more and having sex less. So why are the rates so high? As part of our series on Latinos and health, reporter Audrey Quinn visits the Bronx and talks to community health advocate Vincent Guilamo-Ramos about trying to improve teen sexual health in this borough.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Audrey Quinn is a multimedia science journalist in Brooklyn, New York. She reports for a variety of public radio shows and multimedia outlets, blogs on health for CBS, produces podcasts and videos for The Mind Science Foundation, and co-directs Radio Cabaret NYC.


The Head Start program is usually aimed at preschoolers. But this summer, the program took three college students who have spent their lives as migrant farmworkers to Washington D.C. for an internship program that aims to open up their career horizons. We speak with the students before they head back to the fields and to school.

Click here to download this week’s show. Visit the National Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Association for more information about their program. To see their intern blog, visit


Sammy Benavidez is a student at St. Edwards University at Austin, Texas, majoring in Social work and minoring in Psychology. In the past, he participated in the Tri-Valley Head-Start program in Grafton, North Dakota, and in TMC Head Start Program in Mercedes, Texas. He hopes to get a Masters in Social Work and also pursue a PhD.

Evangelina Alvarez is from Royal City, Washington. She is currently enrolled at Washington State University, majoring in Business Management and Operations with a minor in Spanish. She hopes to one day own her own business.

Ivon Garcia was born in Puebla, Mexico. She came to the U.S. at age three with her parents who were migrant workers. She graduated from Bridgeport High School and she is currently a Junior at Washington State University, majoring in Human Development and minoring in Women Studies and Spanish.

Cleofas “Cleo” Rodriguez, Jr. is currently the Executive Director of the National Migrant Seasonal Head Start Association in Washington, DC. His parents were migrant farmworkers in Texas and other states. He has been a strong advocate for the emotional development of young children and their families, particularly those of migrant backgrounds.

Hamaca Time: Summer Reading

Summer time is reading time. We are asking professional book lovers about their recommendations for summer reading. First up, Aurora Anaya Cerda, owner of La Casa Azul bookstore in East Harlem, New York, about her pick for kids.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Aurora Anaya-Cerda founded La Casa Azul Bookstore in 2008, an online resource promoting children’s literature, educational programing and literature by Latino writers. As an independent bookseller, Ms. Anaya-Cerda has hosted more than sixty literary events in East Harlem and throughout New York City with renowned authors such as Esmeralda Santiago and Junot Díaz. She is the founder of the East Harlem Children’s Book Festival. Ms. Anaya-Cerda is also the Family Programs and Cultural Celebrations Manager at El Museo del Barrio. She has organized major cultural events in East Harlem, including the annual Three Kings Day Parade and the Dia de los Muertos celebration. Before moving to New York, Aurora Anaya-Cerda was a middle school English teacher, promoting art and literacy in her native East Los Angeles neighborhood. A UCLA graduate, Ms. Anaya-Cerda has a double Bachelor’s degree in History and Chicana/o Studies with a specialization in Education.


The Supreme Court’s mixed decision on Arizona’s immigration law prompted both skepticism and debate. The Court ruled against most of the law’s provisions but left one standing–the one known as the “papers, please” provision, which allows state and local police to question individuals on their immigration status. How did Latino groups in Arizona react? Seth Freed Wessler of Colorlines reports. Click here to read Seth’s work.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Colorlines.

Seth Freed Wessler is an award-winning journalist who’s reported on immigration, the safety net, criminal justice and the human fallout of the financial collapse. He lives in New York where he works as an investigative reporter for and a senior researcher at the Applied Research Center.Seth was recently awarded the Hillman Prize for his groundbreaking investigation on deported parents who lose their children to foster care. In April, he was in the Supreme Court for oral arguments in Arizona v. United States, the SB 1070 case.


We speak to three self-styled “dreamers” about their hopes and fears just after President Obama announced an executive order that would halt the deportations of some young undocumented people.

Click here to download this week’s show. Photo:


Prerna Lal is a student at The George Washington University Law School. She is the co-founder of DreamActivist.Org, and she also serves as a board member for Immigration Equality, an organization that advocates for the rights of LGBT immigrants.


Mohammad Abdollahi is originally from Iran. He came to the U.S. when he was three and became undocumented after en error in his paperwork process. He is one of the founders of National Immigrant Youth Alliance. He was also arrested in 2010 while protesting for passage of the DREAM Act at the Tucson offices of Sen. John McCain.


Lizbeth Mateo is originally from Oaxaca, Mexico. She grew up in Los Angeles where she went to school and became the first in her family to graduate from Cal State University, Northridge. Lizbeth is co-founder of DreamActivist California and The National Immigrant Youth Alliance – an undocumented youth-LED network of grassroots organizations, campus-based student groups and individuals committed to achieving equality for all immigrant youth, regardless of their legal status.

Yo Soy 132: The Mexican Spring

At a private university in Mexico City, students protested a talk by presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto on May 11, and were accused of being agitators for hire by media outlets. One hundred and thirty one of the students involved posted videos identifying themselves as genuine students and sparked a series of large protests against media influence on elections and other political irregularities. We speak to journalist Luisa Ortiz Perez about Yo Soy 132’s off-campus impact.

Click here to download this week’s show.

If you can follow audio en español, check out this segment featuring Sandino Bucio Dovali, one of the students who is part of the Yo Soy 132 movement talking about how he got involved:



Luisa Ortiz Pérez is an on-line producer and editor. She is the founder of Nova Mexico, an organization that generates digital solutions and communication strategies for social responsibility initiatives promoting social change. She has published in specialized journals in Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela and the United States on political discourses and the formation of identities for indigenous groups. As a producer she has worked for NPR, the BBC, CBC, Yahoo! Latin America and

Teach A Man To Fish

For Michael McDaniel, fishing runs in the family. He grew up fishing with his grandfather and now he takes his sons to the same spot where he would swing bait when he was little. Reporter Lauren Whaley takes us out on a fishing trip with Michael’s family.

Click here to download this week’s show.
Check out other Californian families that also bond through fishing below:

Lauren M. Whaley is a multimedia journalist based in Los Angeles. She produces audio, photography, video and written stories on topics ranging from childbirth trends to healthcare for low-income seniors. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Outside Magazine as well as on KQED Public Radio and Southern California Public Radio. She serves on the board of the Journalism & Women Symposium (JAWS) and lives with her husband Jake de Grazia, also a radio journalist and photographer.

Blair Wells is a Los Angeles-based photographer whose journey with camera-in-hand began in 2002, using throw-away Kodaks to visually articulate his experience living in Central L.A. His love of documentary photography has led him to capture the face and heart of social issues, including projects featuring post-Katrina New Orleans day-workers, the everyday moments of a Santa Barbara homeless family and health issues of kids living near the Port of Los Angeles. Blair has also organized participatory photography projects involving the deaf community, as well as teenagers with autism. His projects have given participants an opportunity to express themselves in new and profound ways. Through it all, the human condition — the struggles and successes of everyday people — remains the single most compelling subject of his work.


March 9 was a notorious day in El Salvador: two of the country’s largest gangs, MS 13 and 18th street, called for a truce to stop the violence that has turned the country into one of the most dangerous places in the world. Since the agreement took place, there have been reports of a 60 percent drop in homicides. We speak to Alex Sanchez, director of Los Angeles based Homies Unidos and former MS 13 member.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Alex Sanchez is an internationally recognized peacemaker and co-founder of Homies Unidos in Los Angeles where he has developed and implemented innovative violence prevention and intervention programs since 1998 and has also lead the organization as Executive Director since 2006.He has been sought out to consult with academics, journalists, filmmakers, elected officials, non-profit agencies and advocates at local, national and transnational levels to address youth violence prevention and intervention and is the recipient of many awards including the Drum Major Award from the Martin Luther King Legacy Association, the Lottie Wexler Award, the AGAPE Award and others.

Minor Crossers

Every year, thousands of unaccompanied minors cross the U.S/Mexico border to be reunited with family.  But this spring, the Department of Health and Human Services reported that the number of minors arriving alone had nearly doubled. We speak to Pulitzer Prize winning author and journalist Sonia Nazario about who these minors are and why the numbers have shot up.

Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Times.

Sonia Nazario is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and author of Enrique’s Journey, a national bestseller that has been adopted by more than 50 universities across the country. She has spent more than 20 years reporting and writing about social issues, hunger, drug addiction, and immigration, most recently as a projects reporter for the Los Angeles Times.

The Viva Factor: Arizona and Maná

Listeners of a Spanish-language radio station in Phoenix heard ads in early May asking them to text their political opinion… and maybe win concert tickets. Is this data mining or a clever new strategy? Fernanda Echavarri walks us through the ads and Matt Barreto analyzes it, looking for the “Viva Factor.”

Since the 1952 presidential campaign, when candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower used the slogan “Viva Eisenhower” in an initiative to attract Mexican-American voters, whenever political candidates have wanted to signal to Latinos, they place the word “Viva” in front of their names. Our new series looks for the “Viva Factor,” the ways in which candidates and both parties aim to draw in the Latino vote.

Click here to download this week’s show. To hear the actual radio ad in Spanish, click here. To hear it in English, click here.

Explaining Comemierrrrr… coles

This week’s segment rates an ad giving it a “comemierrr… coles” rating to test pandering to Latinos. The expression “comemiércoles” substitutes the naughty half of a Cuban expression for “B.S.” with the Spanish word for “Wednesday.” Consider it your Spanish lesson for the day.

 Fernanda Echávarri is a reporter for Arizona Public Media in Tucson, Arizona. Echávarri, a graduate of the University of Arizona School of Journalism, contributes stories to radio and online. She started her career in print journalism as a reporter for the Tucson Citizen. She then went on to work for the Arizona Daily Star, where she focused on public safety and investigative reporting. Echávarri received a Freedom of Information Award from the Arizona Newspaper Association in 2011 for her work in a series published in the Arizona Daily Star.
Matt A. Barreto is an Associate Professor in political science at the University of Washington, Seattle and the director of the Washington Institute for the Study of Ethnicity and Race (WISER). He is also the director of the annual Washington Poll. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Irvine in 2005. His research examines the political participation of racial and ethnic minorities in the United States and his work has been published in the American Political Science Review, Political Research Quarterly, Social Science Quarterly, Public Opinion Quarterly, and other peer reviewed journals.

The Kids Are All Right

How do kids who were not even born in 1992 think about the LA riots? Hear a group of teen documentary producers from Harlem reflect on Rodney King and the time period when LA burned.

Click here to download this week’s show.


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