Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Young Voices’ Category

Teach A Man To Fish

For Michael McDaniel, fishing runs in the family. He grew up fishing with his grandfather and now he takes his sons to the same spot where he would swing bait when he was little. Reporter Lauren Whaley takes us out on a fishing trip with Michael’s family.


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Check out other Californian families that also bond through fishing below:

Lauren M. Whaley is a multimedia journalist based in Los Angeles. She produces audio, photography, video and written stories on topics ranging from childbirth trends to healthcare for low-income seniors. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Outside Magazine as well as on KQED Public Radio and Southern California Public Radio. She serves on the board of the Journalism & Women Symposium (JAWS) and lives with her husband Jake de Grazia, also a radio journalist and photographer.

Blair Wells is a Los Angeles-based photographer whose journey with camera-in-hand began in 2002, using throw-away Kodaks to visually articulate his experience living in Central L.A. His love of documentary photography has led him to capture the face and heart of social issues, including projects featuring post-Katrina New Orleans day-workers, the everyday moments of a Santa Barbara homeless family and health issues of kids living near the Port of Los Angeles. Blair has also organized participatory photography projects involving the deaf community, as well as teenagers with autism. His projects have given participants an opportunity to express themselves in new and profound ways. Through it all, the human condition — the struggles and successes of everyday people — remains the single most compelling subject of his work.

Noticiando

March 9 was a notorious day in El Salvador: two of the country’s largest gangs, MS 13 and 18th street, called for a truce to stop the violence that has turned the country into one of the most dangerous places in the world. Since the agreement took place, there have been reports of a 60 percent drop in homicides. We speak to Alex Sanchez, director of Los Angeles based Homies Unidos and former MS 13 member.


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Alex Sanchez is an internationally recognized peacemaker and co-founder of Homies Unidos in Los Angeles where he has developed and implemented innovative violence prevention and intervention programs since 1998 and has also lead the organization as Executive Director since 2006.He has been sought out to consult with academics, journalists, filmmakers, elected officials, non-profit agencies and advocates at local, national and transnational levels to address youth violence prevention and intervention and is the recipient of many awards including the Drum Major Award from the Martin Luther King Legacy Association, the Lottie Wexler Award, the AGAPE Award and others.

Minor Crossers

Every year, thousands of unaccompanied minors cross the U.S/Mexico border to be reunited with family.  But this spring, the Department of Health and Human Services reported that the number of minors arriving alone had nearly doubled. We speak to Pulitzer Prize winning author and journalist Sonia Nazario about who these minors are and why the numbers have shot up.

Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Times.


Sonia Nazario is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and author of Enrique’s Journey, a national bestseller that has been adopted by more than 50 universities across the country. She has spent more than 20 years reporting and writing about social issues, hunger, drug addiction, and immigration, most recently as a projects reporter for the Los Angeles Times.

The Viva Factor: Arizona and Maná

Listeners of a Spanish-language radio station in Phoenix heard ads in early May asking them to text their political opinion… and maybe win concert tickets. Is this data mining or a clever new strategy? Fernanda Echavarri walks us through the ads and Matt Barreto analyzes it, looking for the “Viva Factor.”

Since the 1952 presidential campaign, when candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower used the slogan “Viva Eisenhower” in an initiative to attract Mexican-American voters, whenever political candidates have wanted to signal to Latinos, they place the word “Viva” in front of their names. Our new series looks for the “Viva Factor,” the ways in which candidates and both parties aim to draw in the Latino vote.

Click here to download this week’s show. To hear the actual radio ad in Spanish, click here. To hear it in English, click here.

Explaining Comemierrrrr… coles

This week’s segment rates an ad giving it a “comemierrr… coles” rating to test pandering to Latinos. The expression “comemiércoles” substitutes the naughty half of a Cuban expression for “B.S.” with the Spanish word for “Wednesday.” Consider it your Spanish lesson for the day.

 Fernanda Echávarri is a reporter for Arizona Public Media in Tucson, Arizona. Echávarri, a graduate of the University of Arizona School of Journalism, contributes stories to radio and online. She started her career in print journalism as a reporter for the Tucson Citizen. She then went on to work for the Arizona Daily Star, where she focused on public safety and investigative reporting. Echávarri received a Freedom of Information Award from the Arizona Newspaper Association in 2011 for her work in a series published in the Arizona Daily Star.
Matt A. Barreto is an Associate Professor in political science at the University of Washington, Seattle and the director of the Washington Institute for the Study of Ethnicity and Race (WISER). He is also the director of the annual Washington Poll. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Irvine in 2005. His research examines the political participation of racial and ethnic minorities in the United States and his work has been published in the American Political Science Review, Political Research Quarterly, Social Science Quarterly, Public Opinion Quarterly, and other peer reviewed journals.

The Kids Are All Right

How do kids who were not even born in 1992 think about the LA riots? Hear a group of teen documentary producers from Harlem reflect on Rodney King and the time period when LA burned.
 

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YANIRA’S STORY

The numbers are shocking: one in seven Latinas in the U.S. will make an attempt to take her own life.

It’s not widely known or reported, but young Latinas attempt suicide at much higher rates than girls in other ethnic groups. Today on the program, we try to understand why. We have invited Dr. Luis Zayas to join us and to serve as our guide. Zayas teaches in Saint Louis, at both the School of Medicine at Washington University and at its School of Social Work, where he founded and directs the Center for Latino Family Research. It’s the only one of its kind in the nation: a social research center dedicated to Latino health, mental health, and family & community development in the U.S. and in Latin America.

But each story of a Latina teen suicide attempt is a deeply personal story. So, on today’s program we meet Yanira — a young Dominican-American who lives in Harlem and who has struggled with depression—and repression—for years. Yanira’s life is a contradiction: she’s forced to act like an adult, while being denied the permission to do things that many ordinary teenagers can do.

Reporter Laura Starecheski takes us inside her story.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Cuban Americans Act for Change

A group of young Cuban-Americans, some born here in the United States and some born in Cuba, gathered at Cornell University recently for the third annual conference of Raices de Esperanza (Roots of Hope), a group dedicated to empowering young Cubans. Participants span the spectrum in their views about highly charged issues such as the embargo and travel to Cuba. Lygia Navarro speaks with these college students and young professionals about how their involvement with Raices de Esperanza has challenged and changed their thinking about Cuba and U.S.-Cuba relations.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

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