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Must-Watch Movies For Journalists

The holiday season means snuggling on the couch for a well-deserved movie marathon.

Latino USA has curated a list of must-see movies for aspiring journalists.

Did we miss your favorite flick? Use the comment box or tweet @LatinoUSA #Movies4Journos

 

 

1) His Girl Friday

This classic movie is a comedy between editor & reporter on a crazy deadline. Protagonist Hildy is a total role model for her zingers, editorial judgment and THAT SUIT. – Carolina Gonzalez

 

 

2) Good Night And Good Luck

A great movie about ethics in journalism. David Strathairn is a perfectly cast Edward R. Murrow fighting his famous media battle against McCarthyism. Every aspiring journalist should know his story. – Maria Hinojosa

 

3) Full Metal Jacket

A look at war correspondence during Vietnam. It’s more about war than journalism, but the reporting elements are hilarious and revealing. – Michael Simon Johnson

 

4) The Mothman Prophecies

A fun campy thriller starring Richard Gere and Laura Linney, we recommend it solely for the chapstick scene, though Richard Gere is great in his portrayl of a newspaper columnist. -A.C. Valdez

 

5) Control Room

A movie about Al Jazzera covering the war in Iraq. Watching the transformation of the media guy for the armed forces from this close minded soldier to a compassionate questioner is really remarkable. And it gives us a glimpse into the US Military’s control of the media. – Jonathan Wolfe

 

6) Network

A network news anchor flips and says what he really thinks about the media. Old movie but still very relevant.- Jonathan Wolfe

 

7) Reportero

A documentary about covering the border and drug cartels in particular in Mexico. Puts our press freedom here in perspective as well as drawing attention to the plight of embattled and threatened reporters and local journalists in particular. – A.C. Valdez

 

8) The Killing Fields

A photographer is trapped in Cambodia during tyrant Pol Pot’s bloody cleansing campaign, which claimed the lives of 2million  civilians. – Marea Chaveco

 

9) All The President’s Men

Reporters Woodward and Bernstein uncover the details of the Watergate scandal that leads to President Nixon’s resignation. – Marea Chaveco

 

10) The Year Of Living Dangerously

A young Australian reporter tries to navigate the political turmoil of Indonesia during the rule of President Sukarno with the help of a diminutive photographer. – Marea Chaveco

 

11) Morning Glory

Rachel McAdams shows what it’s like to be an early-morning producer on a daily show. – Brenda Salinas

#1350 – Money, Money, Money

From Puerto Rico to the Bay Area, Latino USA examines questions of money. Marlon Bishop tells us Puerto Rico could soon default on its public debt. We examine the potential economic impact of immigration reform, a democratic system to spend public money in New York, and helping the unbanked in Oakland. We’ll hear about the debt-incurring cost of quinceañeras. We hear from two Latino tech leaders. And our series on the Dearly Deported continues.

 

Photo: Karen Bleiber/AFP/Getty Images

 

 

Latina Sex Stereotypes

Photo by Flickr, Martin LaBar

For Latina women it can often seem like there are only two types of representation they see in the media. They’re either sexy and “spicy” or religious and family oriented. But is that really the case?

Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa speaks to writer, poet, and sex columnist for Cosmo for Latinas, Erika Sanchez about growing up in a “traditional” Mexican family while being an American girl, feminism, and facing fear.

 

B1_ErikaSanchezErika L Sánchez is a poet and writer living in Chicago. Her poems have appeared in Pleiades, Witness, Hunger Mountain, Crab Orchard Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Copper Nickel, and others. Her nonfiction has been published in Cosmopolitan for Latinas, NBCLatino, Truthout, Salon, Rolling Stone, Salon, The Guardian, and Al Jazeera.

News or Noise? Decisions Edition

In newsrooms around the world, decisions are often made during editorial meetings. People pitch ideas, discuss developing stories, and plan their coverage. How do these meetings work and why are they helpful?

For our regular segment on news literacy, Latino USA producer Daisy Rosario takes you inside the weekly editorial meeting of The Mash, a teen publication put out by the Chicago Tribune.

C2_Joe HendrixJoe Hendrix is a junior at Daniel Hale Williams Prep School of Medicine, located on the South Side of Chicago. He joined The Mash earlier this year and has shown a strong interest in writing movie reviews—especially when he gets to share his thoughts on Marvel films. Joe’s most recent Mash article explained why teens feel the need to compare themselves to others and how social media affects self-esteem.

 

C2_Elani-Kaufman-TonedElani Kaufman is a junior at Lincoln Park High School. Although this is her first year with The Mash, Elani has already worked on a wide range of articles, including a story about Thanksgivukkah, commentary for our regular fashion police column and a fun piece about cleansing your musical palate.

 

 

C2_Phil ThompsonPhillip Thompson is the editorial director of The Mash. For five years, Phil has enjoyed working with teens (even though he’s slightly of afraid of them). A 16-year vet of the Chicago Tribune, he’s also a contributor to RedEye’s Five on Five sports comedy panel (a sense of humor comes in handy, especially if you’ve had a fantasy football year like he’s had.)

 

C2_MorganOlsen

Morgan Olsen is The Mash’s managing editor. She moved to Chicago earlier this year from Los Angeles, where she worked for two teen entertainment magazines. When she’s not editing stories or roaming the Tribune Tower, Morgan is exploring Chicago and drinking way too much coffee.

Dearly Deported: Turkey

In the first of our Dearly Deported profiles, Efe Atli of Turkey tells us the story of why being deported provided the motivation he needed to get his life together.

 

contributors1

AC-photo11Andrés Caballero has been an active contributor to Latino USA for more than a year. He holds a M.S. in Journalism from the Columbia University School of Journalism, and a B.S. in Political Science from Notre Dame De Namur University. He covers issues that affect Latinos across the U.S., and he has also contributed to New America Media, the Hispanic Link News Service in Washington D.C., and El Tecolote in San Francisco.

This Week’s Captions: Adventure Time!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

From the depths of Puerto Rico’s jungles to the mountains of Colorado, we’re taking you along with us for a few adventures this week. Join a reporter for an adventure in the kitchen. Hear the profile of a man who just put out his first album—at 80 years old. Come along with host Maria Hinojosa as she trains for her first race. Learn about “Narco Cultura,” and the social impact of drug cartels in Mexico

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Narco Cultura


Photojournalist and film director Shaul Schwarz’s new documentary Narco Cultura contrasts Mexico’s drug violence with the music and fandom of narcocorridos–a style of music that celebrates the anti-heros of the Mexican cartels. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with director Shaul Schwarz and former narcocorrido marketing director Joel Vazquez about the film, the musical movement of narcocorridos, and the state of Mexican-American self-identity. She also speaks with economist Rodrigo Canales about cartels as a business.

A1 Shaul SchwarzShaul Schwarz is an Israeli photojournalist and film director. His work has appeared in National Geographic, Newsweek, Time, The New York Times Magazine, El Pais Magazine, GQ and Marie Claire. His coverage of the conflict in Haiti in 2004 received two World Press Awards. Most recently he was honored with the 2008 Robert Capa Award given out by the Overseas Press Club.

 

 

 

A1 Joel Vazquez 2Joel Vazquez: Joel Vazquez works in advertising and marketing for narcocorrido bands. He is the former marketing director for Twiins Enterprises, one of the largest narcocorrido labels in the U.S.

 

 

 

 

A2 Rodrigo CanalesRodrigo Canales is an Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at Yale School of Management. He researches the role of institutions in entrepreneurship and economic development. Specifically, Rodrigo studies how individuals purposefully change complex organizations or systems.

 

Running Tips From A Latina All-Star

How do you embark on an adventure? Take it one step at a time!

Next month, Maria Hinojosa is doing something she’s never done before — training for a race! Ahead of her first 5k, we called all-star runner Brenda Martinez for some training tips.

 Photo courtesy of New Balance. 

B2 Running Tips_Headshot_BrendaMartinez_Getty

At the recent IAAF Track & Field World Championships in Moscow, Brenda Martinez became the first American woman to win a medal in the 800m. She ran her personal best and won the bronze medal. Martinez, 25, is from Rancho Cucamongo, CA and the only Latina on the national track and field team. Martinez started running at five years old and became the first person in her family to go to college when she attended UC-Riverside. She won the 2009 NCAA Outdoor Championship in the 1,500m and was a three-time NCAA All-American. Photo courtesy of Getty Images. 

Conquering Colorado’s Mountains

Fresh out of a divorce and going through depression, Stella Juarez decided to take up hiking. Now, it’s an addiction that has helped her heal. Juarez is on a mission to climb all 53 of Colorado’s 14,000 foot peaks, called “fourteeners,” and she’s inspiring others to follow in her tracks. Reporter Lesley McClurg joined Juarez and two young Latinas for a climb in Central Colorado.

This story is part of the RadioNature series which explores the ways Latinos connect with nature. RadioNature is supported by the REI Foundation.

Photo courtesy of Lesley McClurg, Diana Oregon climbing Mount Sherman, Colorado.  

contributors1

McClurgLesley McClurg is a reporter and producer for Colorado Public Radio’s daily interview program, “Colorado Matters.” She came to CPR after getting her start in public radio as a freelance reporter and producer for KUOW in Seattle, Washington. Prior to that, Lesley spent more than three years working in public television in Seattle, reporting on a variety of stories and producing long-form segments for KCTS 9 Public Television.
In addition to her work as a journalist, Lesley also has extensive experience in documentary filmmaking and writing. A seven-time Emmy Award nominee, she won an Emmy Award in 2009 for the documentary, “Green Prison Reform.” Lesley holds a bachelor’s degree in mass communications from Louisiana State University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Al & Lalo’s Big Adventure

Our favorite funny men, Al Madrigal and Lalo Alcaraz return to Latino USA for their regular segment. This month they tell us the things they’re thankful for that they couldn’t discuss with their families. It’s not the stuff you’d expect. And we get to hear all about Lalo’s new adventure in television.

 Photo courtesy of Lalo Alcaraz.

contributors1

 

MADRIGAL-300x168A correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” since 2011, Al Madrigal has been named Best Stand-Up Comedian by the HBO/U.S. Comedy Arts Festival and his material dubbed “dynamic” by The New York Times. His unique, spontaneous and fast-paced lyrical storytelling style has made him a regular on television with numerous appearances on Comedy Central including his own half-hour Comedy Central Presents Special.

 

 

 

Lalo_hs-150x150Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip,“La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border.

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