Archive for the ‘Violence Prevention’ Category

If You Build It…

Emily Wilson reports from Alameda County, where there are few health clinics available to address problems like teen pregnancy and gang violence. That is, until a group of teenagers decided to take action and lobby hard to get a community youth center built.

Photo courtesy of Jamie Hintzke

 

contributors1

emilyheadshot.jpgEmily Wilson is a freelance reporter and producer in San Francisco. She teaches adults earning their GED and high school diploma at City College of San Francisco.

Noticiando: Remembering Haitian Massacre

Seventy-five years ago, President Rafael Trujillo ordered all Haitians living along the Dominican border killed. Prof. Edward Paulino speaks about an effort organized by Dominicans and Haitians living on the U.S. to commemorate the anniversary and foster healthy Dominican-Haitian relations.


Click here to download this week’s show.


Professor Edward Paulino teaches history at CUNY’s John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He is on the board of the Northern Manhattan Coalition for Immigrant Rights. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife and two children.

Noticiando: Peace Passage

Since poet and writer Javier Sicilia’s 24-year-old son was killed by Mexican drug cartels last year, he has worked to end the violence that has already claimed tens of thousands of victims since 2006. He is leading a Caravan for Peace from San Diego to Washington, DC to raise awareness about the victims of the drug war affecting Mexico and the U.S. We speak to Pepe Rivera, one of the organizers of the caravan.

Click here to download this week’s show.

José -Pepe- Rivera is a coordinator of the Documentation Commission of the Movement for Peace with Justice & Dignity, where he documents victims of the war on drugs and prohibition. He is also a coordinator for the Communications Commission for Caravan for Peace. He is a documentary photographer and consultant, and he has worked for the International Federation of the Red Cross and the Mexican United Nations Association.

Vicki the Crime Fighter

For Vickie Cruz, coming out as a trans young woman in the 1960s meant learning to defend herself physically and emotionally. But with the support of her large Puerto Rican family, she used her experiences to help victims of sexual and domestic violence, earning her a Crime Victims Service Award this year from the U.S. Attorney General’s office. Von Diaz reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Merel van Beeren.

Von Diaz is a multimedia journalist based in New York City. Her reporting focuses on immigration, Cuba, and LGBT issues. She was born in Puerto Rico and raised in Atlanta, GA. She is a Feet in Two Worlds fellow, and has published her work on PRI’s The World, WNYC, and New American Media.

Noticiando

Puerto Rico is the only place in the Western hemisphere where those charged with rape or murder are still eligible for bail. With an all time high in homicides, a new referendum in Puerto Rico could allow judges to deny bail in certain cases. We speak to Julio Varela, blogger and founder of Latino Rebels, to get an idea of what this referendum means and what impact it could have on the island.


Click here to download this week’s show.

 

 

Noticiando

March 9 was a notorious day in El Salvador: two of the country’s largest gangs, MS 13 and 18th street, called for a truce to stop the violence that has turned the country into one of the most dangerous places in the world. Since the agreement took place, there have been reports of a 60 percent drop in homicides. We speak to Alex Sanchez, director of Los Angeles based Homies Unidos and former MS 13 member.


Click here to download this week’s show.
 

Alex Sanchez is an internationally recognized peacemaker and co-founder of Homies Unidos in Los Angeles where he has developed and implemented innovative violence prevention and intervention programs since 1998 and has also lead the organization as Executive Director since 2006.He has been sought out to consult with academics, journalists, filmmakers, elected officials, non-profit agencies and advocates at local, national and transnational levels to address youth violence prevention and intervention and is the recipient of many awards including the Drum Major Award from the Martin Luther King Legacy Association, the Lottie Wexler Award, the AGAPE Award and others.

Nicaragua: Women, Violence, and Elections

This upcoming November marks fifty years since the murder of the Mirabal Sisters by the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo in the Dominican Republic. Since then the three sisters have been a symbol for Latin American feminists everywhere and the United Nations has declared November 25th a national day for the elimination of violence against women. It will be commemorated in many Latin American countries, including Nicaragua, where women are currently experiencing an increasing wave of violence. As Presidential elections near in Nicaragua on November 6th, women’s organizations are condemning the violence and the laws, and institutions that perpetuate it. Independent journalist Maria Martin reports from Managua, Nicaragua.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Opera en la Calle

In recent years Tijuana has become synonymous with grim murders and the violent drug war. But cultural workers there are trying to change that image and showcase Tijuana’s vibrant communities of artists and great restaurants. One shining example is the Festival “Opera en la calle” that recently celebrated its eighth year. It is a celebration, which started as a small event in one of Tijuana’s oldest neighborhoods, Colonia Libertad. It has grown through the years, and this summer it drew over 10,000 opera fans, some of the best singers in this quarter of the continent, and numerous art booths, food stands, and costumed performers. Reporter Jon Beaupré was there and brings us a taste of it.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Tats Cru

The streets of the South Bronx in the 1980s and 90s were littered with abandoned buildings, drug dealers, prostitutes and people were being killed everyday as a part of the neighborhood’s off the charts murder rate. It was out of that reality that a group of young Puerto Rican graffiti artists got their start tagging subways. Inspired by their passion for painting, their art soon evolved and they started painting colorful memorial walls throughout the neighborhood in memory of kids who had fallen victim to street violence. Maria Hinojosa first interviewed the artists of Tats Cru 17 years ago when you could find memorial walls on nearly every street corner in the neighborhood.

Now nearly 20 years later, she’s gone back to interview Nicer one of the founding artists from Tats Cru to talk about the issue of gun violence and how much the problem of street violence has changed.
Produced by Yasmeen Qureshi

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Femicide in Guatemala

In Guatemala, as in many Latin American countries, violence against women is at a frightful level. With a population of 14 million, Guatemala officially counts more than four thousand violent murders of women from 2000-2008: 98% of the cases remain unsolved.

A mixture of misogyny, culturally-based gender inequality, and continuing corruption and impunity all add to the tragedy of these deaths. (You can read the report of the Guatemala Human Rights Commission on Femicide.)

A Guatemalan woman seeking asylum in the United States made her case on those grounds. An appeals court ruling in her favor has raised the possibility that more women may seek shelter in the United States to avoid becoming victims of femicide. Katie Davis talks with Allen Hutchinson, the woman’s lawyer.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Violence in Bolivia

Over the past couple of years, women in Bolivia have been subjected to violent crime at a dramatically high rate. But a new law seeks to curb the violence, and to finally bring perpetrators to justice. The Fonografia Collective’s Ruxandra Guidi reports from El Alto, Bolivia.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Juarez Killings

Over the past decade, Juarez, Mexico, just across the river from El Paso, Texas, has garnered much unwanted attention. The murder of women and girls lured to the border by the promise of jobs in the maquila industry emerged in the late 1990s. And the first decade of the 21st century saw a major increase in drug-related violence.

It’s hard to avoid gruesome murder photos constantly in the Mexican media. But the recent killings of Americans and Mexicans connected to the American consul in Juarez have again shocked the community. Questions quickly arose as to why drug gangs would target the American embassy. But American FBI units have said that Americans were not specifically targeted and could have been caught in a case of mistaken identity.

Alfredo Corchado has been following the drug violence for years as Mexico bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Documenting Border Violence

In January of 2009, independent producer Scott Carrier produced a report for NPR’s Day-to-Day program (now defunct). In it, Scott followed around a Mexican photographer whose job it was to photograph gruesome drug-related murder scenes before the bodies were taken away to the local morgue. Most of the photos would appear in the next morning’s newspapers.

Here again is that broadcast.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

This story was part of Day to Day’s “Hearing Voices” series. CLICK HERE to link to the original broadcast dated January 5, 2009.

U.S.-Mexico Border Violence

Murders are a daily occurrence along the U.S.-Mexico border. Fueled by the drug trade, the killings no longer necessarily make the front pages of newspapers in communities such as El Paso and Ciudad Juarez. Maria talks with Latino USA contributor Monica Ortiz Uribe about the current state of affairs along the border.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Miguel Turriza, a reporter for Noticias Cablecom, found himself in the crossfire in February in Reynosa, Mexico.

In Memorium: Esther Chavez Cano [1933 – 2009]

When Esther Chavez Cano first organized protests in 1993 in Ciudad Juarez, hers was the initiating voice against “femicide,” a term given to the murder of hundreds of women in this border town. She accused local police and political leaders of covering up the murders and chided local media for not paying enough attention to the crimes. And her protests led to international attention on the murder of women and girls in Juarez.

But Chavez was more than simply an organizer. She was also a healer. She went on to found the city’s first rape crisis center known simply as Casa Amiga. She traveled the world raising awareness of the murders in Juarez, and raising money for the center. In 2008, Mexican President Felipe Calderón presented Chavez with the country’s highest human rights award. Her center also receives support by Mexican federal grants.

Chavez succumbed to cancer on Christmas Day, 2009. El Paso reporter Monica Ortiz Uribe has this remembrance.


Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

THIS WEEK'S CAPTIONS: Let's...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

This Week's Captions: Money...

THIS WEEK'S SHOW: From Puerto Rico to…

CAPTIONS

Audio visual notes for the hearing impaired.

Join the conversation

© 2015 Futuro Media Group

Contact /

Your privacy is important to us. We do not share your information.

[bwp-recaptcha bwp-recaptcha-913]

Tel /

+1 646-571-1220

Fax /

+1 646-571-1221

Mailing Address /

361 West 125st Street
Fourth Floor
New York, NY 10027