Archive for the ‘Violence Prevention’ Category

Hate Crimes Task Force

On Nov. 8, 2008, Marcelo Lucero, an Ecuadorian immigrant, was murdered in the town of Patchogue, New York. Police say that several teenagers who called themselves the “Caucasian Crew” were partaking of a little sport they called “beaner jumping” when they beat Marcelo Lucero to death.

Among other things, the incident led to the formation of the Suffolk County Hate Crimes Task Force, pictured above. What the task force quickly learned was that Lucero wasn’t the only beating victim by these and other teens.

A new report released by the Southern Poverty Law Center documents the “Climate of Fear” in Suffolk County. It goes on to name names of political leaders they identify as hate “enablers.”

Mark Potok is director of the Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project and editor of the new report. He speaks with Latino USA’s Maria Hinojosa about the fears of immigrants in Suffolk County, New York.


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El Paso’s New Emphasis on Domestic Violence

In the 1950s and 60s, police often treated cases of domestic violence as personal family issues. Many women’s groups and activists worked throughout the 1970s and 1980s to change attitudes of prosecutors and law enforcement groups. But the issues surrounding domestic violence don’t simply go away with an attitude change.

El Paso District Attorney Jaime Esparza

In El Paso, Texas, teams of officers and victims advocates specializing in domestic violence cases are charged with investigating such complaints within 24 hours. It’s a program launched by the El Paso District Attorney. And it’s resulting in stronger criminal cases against offenders and quicker assistance for victims.

Latino USA contributor Monica Ortiz Uribe reports.


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Guatemala: Alma de la Tierra

The lush greenery of Guatemala is ubiquitous, earning the moniker, “Land of Eternal Spring.” To travel the picturesque countryside of Guatemala, one would have little idea that this modest-sized country of 13 million people shouldered such a violent past. The 36-year civil war killed over 200,000 people and ended in a fragile peace in December 1996, putting an end to a series of military dictatorships and returning the country to civilian rule.

For years weak democratic institutions of Guatemala have been tested by crime, corruption, drug trafficking, and social unrest. Many promises made under the 1996 Peace Accords have yet to be fulfilled. And those in power have enjoyed an impunity caused by a weak judicial system.

All this came to a head this month when an otherwise non-descript killing took place on the streets of Guatemala City.

Days after his murder, Guatemalan Attorney Rodrigo Rosenburg could be seen in a video that was slated to be released in case of his demise. The video accuses Guatemalan President Alvaro Colom of ordering his murder.

Claudia Méndez Arriaza

In subsequent days, political rallies have called for Colom’s resignation and investigation; while other marchers, who consider the leftist Colom a champion for the poor, have come out in support of the embattled president.

Claudia Méndez Arriaza is an investigative reporter for El Periódico newspaper in Guatemala.

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Reporter Claudia Méndez Arriaza responded to Maria Hinojosa in Spanish. Listen to their extended conversation without the English voice over.
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But Why?

Prof. Donald Green

Not everyone who feels hate becomes motivated to commit a crime. And not everyone who commits a crime is motivated by hate. Committing a hate crime involves a confluence of issues. Sometimes, hate crimes are motivated by territorial and ethnic disputes, or economic pressures and stereotypical finger-pointing. Professor Donald Green is a Political Scientist from Yale University who has done research into the psychology of hate crimes. His conversation with Maria Hinojosa helps shed some light on this complex and deadly phenomenon.

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Latino Victimization

Patchogue, Long Island, New York is not unlike many changing communities today. An influx of Spanish-speaking immigrants has caused friction. But in recent years, Latino immigrants say they have been harassed, beaten, stalked, and even robbed, mainly by white teenagers on Long Island. While the local police believe that the recent stabbing and murder of Ecuadoran immigrant Marcello Lucero was an isolated incident, they nonetheless are increasing their outreach to the Spanish-speaking community. The immigrants not only welcome the gesture but wonder why hadn’t this been done years ago? WSHU Reporter Charles Lane investigates as part of Latino USA’s New American Voices series.

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