Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Voting’ Category

Roundtable: Does the Latino Vote Matter?

As presidential elections approach, once again the state of the Latino vote gets discussed. While the Latino population keeps increasing, many are non-citizens, very young and in parts of the country that are not contested. So to what extent does it really matter to mobilize Latino voters in November? We speak to Ray Suarez, host of the PBS News Hour, and to Antonio Gonzalez, executive director of the William C. Velasquez Institute, to get a sense of the figures and the strategies.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of New American Media.

Antonio Gonzalez is President of the William C. Velasquez Institute. WCVI, founded in 1985, is a paramount national Latino public policy and research organization.Gonzalez assumed the presidency of WCVI in 1994, after working in various capacities for WCVI founding President Willie Velasquez as well as his successor Andrew Hernandez during 1984-94. He assumed the presidency of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, a non-partisan voter mobilization entity, in 1994.

Ray Suarez joined The NewsHour in October 1999 as a Washington-based Senior Correspondent. Suarez came to The NewsHour from NPR where he had been host of the nationwide, call-in news program “Talk of the Nation” since 1993. Prior to that, he spent seven years covering local and national stories for the NBC-owned station, WMAQ-TV in Chicago.

Noticiando: NALEO In Review

The annual convention for the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials is a who’s who of Latino political influencers, and a good place for politicians to test the waters on the Latino vote. The convention this year was in Orlando, Florida, a hotly contested state. We speak with political reporter and analyst Pilar Marrero from the newspaper La Opinión, who attended the convention, about the stump speeches and surprises there.


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Pilar Marrero is a journalist who for 25 years has extensively covered the areas of city government, immigration and state and national politics. She works for La Opinión as a senior reporter and it’s a regular commentator for radio and television in both spanish and english media. She´s the author of “El Despertar del Sueño Americano” published by Penguing Books and now on sale. The english version of the book, Killing the American Dream, comes out October 2 published by Pallgrave McMillan. Marrero lives in Los Angeles.

Rising Republican Star

New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez has said repeatedly that she would not accept an offer from Mitt Romney if he asked her to be on the ticket with him in November.  Still, she could influence the GOP to moderate their immigration policies.  Sarah Gustavus has this profile of a rising political star, part of new generation of Latino leaders.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of The Hispanic Blog.

Sarah Gustavus reports on topics like government, immigration and poverty for public radio and television, most recently as a reporter and host at KUNM in Albuquerque. Her work has aired nationally on All Things Considered, Weekend America, Making Contact, and Tell Me More. She grew up on a cattle ranch in Texas and spent several years developing her broadcasting skills in Seattle. She is currently studying for a master’s in media at City University in London, where her research focuses on news coverage of immigration.

Thoughts on Mexican Elections

Writer Daniel Hernandez was already disappointed in US politics when he moved to his parents’ home country of Mexico almost five years ago. Now that he is registered to vote in Mexico for the first time he has found old problems in the political system of his new home.

Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of The Americas Program.

Daniel Hernandez is a freelance journalist based in Mexico City and a news assistant in the Los Angeles Times bureau in Mexico. He’s been a staff writer at the L.A. Times and LA Weekly. A native of San Diego, Calif., Daniel is author of the 2011 book “Down & Delirious in Mexico City.”

The Viva Factor: Arizona and Maná

Listeners of a Spanish-language radio station in Phoenix heard ads in early May asking them to text their political opinion… and maybe win concert tickets. Is this data mining or a clever new strategy? Fernanda Echavarri walks us through the ads and Matt Barreto analyzes it, looking for the “Viva Factor.”

Since the 1952 presidential campaign, when candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower used the slogan “Viva Eisenhower” in an initiative to attract Mexican-American voters, whenever political candidates have wanted to signal to Latinos, they place the word “Viva” in front of their names. Our new series looks for the “Viva Factor,” the ways in which candidates and both parties aim to draw in the Latino vote.

Click here to download this week’s show. To hear the actual radio ad in Spanish, click here. To hear it in English, click here.

Explaining Comemierrrrr… coles

This week’s segment rates an ad giving it a “comemierrr… coles” rating to test pandering to Latinos. The expression “comemiércoles” substitutes the naughty half of a Cuban expression for “B.S.” with the Spanish word for “Wednesday.” Consider it your Spanish lesson for the day.

 Fernanda Echávarri is a reporter for Arizona Public Media in Tucson, Arizona. Echávarri, a graduate of the University of Arizona School of Journalism, contributes stories to radio and online. She started her career in print journalism as a reporter for the Tucson Citizen. She then went on to work for the Arizona Daily Star, where she focused on public safety and investigative reporting. Echávarri received a Freedom of Information Award from the Arizona Newspaper Association in 2011 for her work in a series published in the Arizona Daily Star.
Matt A. Barreto is an Associate Professor in political science at the University of Washington, Seattle and the director of the Washington Institute for the Study of Ethnicity and Race (WISER). He is also the director of the annual Washington Poll. He received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Irvine in 2005. His research examines the political participation of racial and ethnic minorities in the United States and his work has been published in the American Political Science Review, Political Research Quarterly, Social Science Quarterly, Public Opinion Quarterly, and other peer reviewed journals.

Dreamers

The stories of Jose Antonio Vargas and Carlos Alban are like so many who grew up in the United States: undocumented, but managing to start careers. And there are also high school and college students who call themselves Dreamers. They are fighting for the Dream Act, which would a grant a passage to citizenship to students and members of the military. For more than a decade, its been an uphill battle to get votes, and in recent years, these students have upped the ante by coming out, publicly and often putting themselves at risk of deportation. We hear from two Dreamers: Lizbeth Mateo and David Cho.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Roberto Suro

Election year is here, and as politicians, pundits, and reporters analyze every subgroup in the electorate to try and predict their votes, we take a step back and look at how changes in the Latino community might affect the upcoming presidential race. For this discussion, Maria Hinojosa speaks with veteran journalist and professor at USC Annenburg, Roberto Suro.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Nicaragua: Women, Violence, and Elections

This upcoming November marks fifty years since the murder of the Mirabal Sisters by the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo in the Dominican Republic. Since then the three sisters have been a symbol for Latin American feminists everywhere and the United Nations has declared November 25th a national day for the elimination of violence against women. It will be commemorated in many Latin American countries, including Nicaragua, where women are currently experiencing an increasing wave of violence. As Presidential elections near in Nicaragua on November 6th, women’s organizations are condemning the violence and the laws, and institutions that perpetuate it. Independent journalist Maria Martin reports from Managua, Nicaragua.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Occupy Wall Street Round Table

It started as a small group of dedicated protesters – Occupy Wall Street was dismissed as a fringe movement. But their message is starting to grab attention with similar protests planned around the country. Demonstrators say they are the 99 percent, but do the protests reflect the diversity of America? Are voices of color also being heard?
To answer this question, Maria Hinojosa hosts a round table debate with Colorlines.com editor Kai Wright, artist Melanie Cervantes, and musician Martin Perna.

Right-click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

Hispanic Republicans of Texas

It’s expected that Latinos will be the majority in Texas in about a decade. Yet the state has one of the lowest Latino voter turnout rates in the country. That is why the GOP is making a play for permanent political dominance in the Lone Star State. In collaboration with the Texas Observer, reporter Melissa del Bosque has this profile of Juan Hernandez and the Hispanic Republicans of Texas PAC.


Right click here to download an .mp3 of this segment.

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