Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Women’s Issues’ Category

Crisis Pregnancy Centers: Deception or Salvation?

It’s been 40 years since Roe v. Wade, but the abortion war rages on.

It’s out on the streets, in the courts, in state legislatures.

But there’s also a quieter fight going on, in the waiting rooms of Crisis Pregnancy Centers (CPCs), places created to discourage women from getting abortions.

Sometimes called pregnancy resource centers, they are non-profit organizations that generally provide peer counseling related to abortion, pregnancy and childbirth. Some also provide non-medical services like financial assistant or adoption referrals.

The majority of CPCs are run by pro-life Christian organizations.

They have commercials like these all over the country:

 

 

 

 

Pro-choice organizations like Planned Parenthood have criticized CPCs for posing as medical facilities, and using intimidation to disseminate false medical information to clients.

 

 

“IT WAS A LOT OF SLUT SHAMING”

Feminist writer Jaclyn Munson went undercover to a crisis pregnancy center in New York City.

“A woman walking into this facility would definitely think this could be a medical facility,” says Munson, “there were white lab coats, they did have the model fetuses out, they did have a lot of pamphlets that looked like medical pamphlets.”

Munson says she was quickly ushered into a room to talk privately with a counselor who told her she was too pretty to be having sex before marriage.

“They build up a great trust with these women, they’re really nice, they’re really friendly, but at the end of the day, you’re a slut who got pregnant and we have to help you so that you never get in this situation again.

But pretty soon, according to Munson, it went from slut shaming to outright misinforming.

“It was a lot of heavy lecturing about breast cancer being implanted in breast cancer and these things that have been scientifically refuted.”

Munson’s experience inside a CPC is echoes the findings from undercover investigations conducted by NARAL Pro Choice chapters all over the country.

 

 

A GODSEND TO WOMEN IN NEED

Rai Rojas, Latino Outreach Director for Right To Life, defends the crisis pregnancy centers’ practices.

These resources are a godsend for a pregnant woman in need, says Rojas, “We hook her up with food stamps, aid from the state, the city and the federal government.”

And Rojas insists, the CPCs aren’t set up to mislead women.

“Crisis Pregnancy Centers aren’t set up to be health care centers, we’re there to provide information that they do not receive at abortion clinics,” says Rojas.

 

WHERE DOES THE LAW STAND?

But the New York City Council didn’t see it their way.

In 2011, it passed a consumer protection law requiring CPCs to openly specify the services they don’t provide and to disclose whether or not they have a medical doctor on staff.

“The law we passed here in this city is pretty simple,” says former New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, “It says, ‘say what you are, say whether you’re a medical office, say if you provide abortion services, say if you provide emergency contraception.’”

The American Center for Law And Justice, which is like a Christian version of the ACLU, argued that the law was violating the crisis pregnancy center’s First Amendment rights.

A federal court first blocked the law, but in January, most of it was upheld by a federal appeals court.

Both sides interpreted this as a victory.

Now, the centers don’t have to disclose whether they provide referrals for emergency contraception, abortion or prenatal care.

“They sided for the most part on the side of the crisis pregnancy centers and said you can’t legislate freedom of speech,” says Rai Rojas from Right to Life, “It’s guaranteed in the first amendment that we can say pretty much what we want and the government can’t prohibit us from saying what we need and want to say.”

But they do have to say whether or not they have a doctor on staff, what kind of services they don’t provide, and they have to protect their clients’ privacy.

“A woman has a right to know when she walks into an office if it’s a medical facility or it’s not,” says former New York City councilwoman Jessica Lapin, “these women give incredibly personal information to these centers and this bill requires them to treat that confidentially.”

 

NO CLEAR WINNER OR LOSER

More than two dozen crisis pregnancy centers are still operating in New York City:

 

cpc map

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And their day-to-day looks pretty much the same.

During the appeals court hearing, the CPCs admitted to purposefully setting up shop as close as possible to registered women’s health clinics.

They also place Spanish-speaking volunteers out on the street to usher Latina women into their doors.

It’s a moral war they’re waging, says Rojas.

“I’ll make it easy for you, the single most dangerous place for a Latino in these United States today is in his mother’s womb.”

And as long as they believe that to be true, this fight’s not going anywhere.

 

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BrendaSalinasBefore coming on board as an associate producer with Latino USA, Brenda Salinas was awarded the highly competitive Kroc Fellowship at NPR. She has reported pieces for Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekends on All Things Considered and for KUHF Houston Public Radio. In college, she started her campus’ only student run foreign-language publication, Nuestras Voces. Brenda has a B.A. in Economics from Columbia University.

 

 

This Week’s Captions: One for the ladies

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Today, we’re hearing from las mujeres—Barnard College president Debora Spar talks about having it all, we hear from three young reporters, discuss nude Louboutin shoes, body hair, and women in sports. Also, Latinas as a social and economic force, teaching dance, and your #LatinoProblems.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Latina Wonder Women?

There’s been a lot written in the past year about women balancing work and family, but what that means for Latinas can be complicated — especially in the world of business. Do they tone down their cultural differences to be accepted in the workplace? Maria Hinojosa talks to the president of Barnard College, Debora Spar. In addition to leading the women’s Liberal Arts college, Spar wrote the book Wonder Women: Sex, Power and the Quest for Perfection.

A1_DEBSPAR_HEADSHOT_CREDITBARNARDCOLLEGE Debora Spar is president of Barnard College and the author of numerous books, including, most recently, Wonder Women:  Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection.  Prior to her arrival at Barnard in 2008, Spar was the Spangler Family Professor at Harvard Business School, where her research and teaching focused on political economy and the various ways in which firms and governments together shape the rules of the global economy.  Spar also serves as a Director of Goldman Sachs and trustee of the Nightingale-Bamford School.

 

Blogueras: Latina Body Image

While women of all kinds have to worry about body image, for Latinas, navigating cultural differences can make things complicated. Maria Hinojosa is joined by blogueras Patricia Valoy and Kassandra Peña to discuss body hair, thigh gaps, and being Latina.

Photo courtesy of Flicker (suez92).

B1_Kassandra2

Kassandra Peña, 24, is a graduate from San Jose State University with a degree in Broadcast Journalism and an academic focus in Spanish. Kassandra currently holds the title of Miss San Jose Latina and her future dreams include visiting all 50 U.S states and working within the media and entertainment industry. Aside from blogging, reading and attending weekly Pilates classes, she also enjoys spending time with her family and two dogs. Photo courtesy of Kassandra Peña.
 
 
B1_PatriciaPatricia Valoy is a  feminist blogger  and a trained Civil Engineer. She combines her experiences as a Latina and an engineer to advocate and inspire girls considering careers in the fields of STEM. Patricia also speaks and writes on a variety of issues affecting the Latin@ community including safe abortion access, racism, immigration, cultural and religious pressures, and living at the intersection of two cultures. Photo courtesy of Patricia Valoy.

Latinas Have the Buying Power

This holiday season, the toymaker Mattel is hoping to boost sales by reaching out to Latina moms. Maria Hinojosa talks about Mattel’s first-ever Spanish-language ad campaign, and a recent Nielsen study that positions Latina moms as a rapidly emerging economic and cultural force.

Photo courtesy of Flicker (davidd).

Bigger, Faster, Stronger: Latinas in Sports

Maria Hinojosa talks to Mexican soccer team member Anisa Guajardo and sports and fitness writer Laanna Carrasco about Latinas in sports, and the self-determination it takes to win.

C2_Anisaphoto2_Courtesy Anisa GuajardoAnisa Guajardo plays soccer for the Boston Breakers as well as the Mexican national soccer team.

C2 Laanna_on_steps courtesy Laanna CarrascoLaanna Carrasco is a sports and fitness writer. Her profile of Anisa Guajardo appeared in the most recent issue of Bigger Faster Stronger magazine.

#LatinoProblems

Being bicultural, multicultural, ambicultural…it can get complicated. We want to help out. We’ve teamed up with Latina Magazine’s advice columnist Pauline Campos for a new recurring segment we like to call #LatinoProblems.

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C3_LatinoProblems_PaulineCampos_Headshot_CreditLatinaMagazine

Pauline Campos is Latina Magazine’s advice & relationship columnist, Latino USA’s #LatinoProblems advice expert on NPR, editor of the ebook anthology, Strong Like Butterfly, and contributes to various websites. Pauline blogs three times a week at Aspiring Mama (or when she remember to take her Adderall) & is the founder of Girl Body Pride.

This Week’s Captions: ¡SALUD!

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

¡Salud! This week Latino USA discusses questions of health. First, how stress and poverty can make you sick, and the latest on teen pregnancy. Then, Al Madrigal and Lalo Alcaraz talk Obamacare, and we check in with California, with stories of youth and rural health. Host Maria Hinojosa shares her newfound healthy enthusiasm for soccer, we hear about the wisdom of boxing, and we raise a glass to Latinos working in wine. All this, and social media reactions to the PBS “Latino Americans” series.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

Awareness, Access, and Advertisements

The good news: overall, teen pregnancy is down. The bad: Latinas are still getting pregnant at a higher rate than other teens. Latino USA’s Daisy Rosario reports on how public health campaigns are trying to combat teen pregnancy, and why critics of these ads view them as “shaming.”

Photo by Diana Montaño

YoungMamas-Nicole_Angresano

Nicole Angresano is the Vice President of Community Impact for United Way of Greater Milwaukee. She oversees more than 160 United Way-funded health and human service programs, as well as leading United Way’s communitywide teen pregnancy prevention efforts aimed at reducing Milwaukee’s rate of births to teens by 46% by 2015 – an issue that has been a focus for her since completing a graduate school thesis on the topic.

 

 

YoungMama-JessGonzalesRojas (1)

Jessica González-Rojas is the Executive Director at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, the only national reproductive justice organization that specifically works to advance reproductive health and rights for Latinas. Jessica is an Adjunct Professor of Latino and Latin American Studies at the City University of New York’s City College and has taught courses on reproductive rights, gender and sexuality.

 

 

 

A2_bill-profile-200x300Bill Albert is the Chief Program Officer of The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, a private, non-profit initiative organized in 1996 that focuses on preventing both teen pregnancy and unplanned pregnancy among single, young adults.  As Chief Program Officer, Mr. Albert is responsible for overall program planning and development, and for tracking program progress.

THIS WEEK’S CAPTIONS: STRAIGHT OUT OF COMMITTEE

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

This week, we bring you an update on the Senate immigration plan as it heads to the Senate floor. And we report from two of the dozens of schools shuttered in Chicago. We sit down with Dominican-American author Raquel Cepeda to talk about her memoir “Bird of Paradise: How I Became a Latina.” Finally, the premiere of “Rebel,” a story about the Cuban women who disguised herself as a man to fight in the Civil War.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

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THIS WEEK'S SHOW: In this week's show,…

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