Archive for the ‘Work’ Category

Cheating Carnival Workers

At all-American carnivals, the workers who run rides and attractions are most often immigrants from Mexico and Central America. An estimated 5,000 workers are recruited abroad yearly to run rides and attractions in the United States.

And according to this report from the American University Washington College of Law and Centro de los Derechos del Migrante, many of these workers endure deceptive recruitment practices, high pre-employment fees and costs, wage theft, lack of access to legal and medical assistance, substandard housing and unsafe work conditions.

In a special report in collaboration with the Nation Institute’s Investigative Fund, we examine how these workers were left out of some federal work protections and how some are now claiming their rights.

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John Carlos FreyJohn Carlos Frey is a freelance investigative reporter and documentary filmmaker based in Los Angeles. His investigative work has been featured on the 60 Minutes episode, “The All American Canal;” a three-part series for PBS entitled “Crossing the Line;” and several episodes of Dan Rather Reports, “Angel of the Desert,” and “Operation Streamline.” In 2011 Frey documented the journey of Mexican migrants across the US-Mexico border and walked for days in the Arizona desert risking his own life for the documentary Life and Death on the Border”. John Carlos Frey has also written articles for the Los Angeles Times, the Huffington Post, Salon, Need to Know online, the Washington Monthly, and El Diario (in Spanish). Frey’s documentary films include The Invisible Mexicans of Deer Canyon (2007), The Invisible Chapel (2008), and The 800 Mile Wall (2009). He is the 2012 recipient of the Scripps Howard Award and the Sigma Delta Chi award for his Investigative Fund/PBS reporting on the excessive use of force by the US Border Patrol. He is a fellow at the Nation Institute’s Investigative Fund.

The U.S. Auto Sector Went South…To Mexico

There are many reasons why immigration from Mexico to the U.S. has come to a virtual standstill. A slow U.S. economy, an increase in border security, and the passage of “show me your papers” laws in many states. But another reason that might not be so obvious is that right now, Mexico’s economy is booming.

Last year, it grew by 4 percent, four times the rate of Brazil’s economy. Reporter Marlon Bishop explains that a lot of the growth is due to high-tech manufacturing.

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Marlon Bishop_new headshotMarlon Bishop is a radio producer, writer, and reporter based in New York. His work is focused on music, Latin America, New York City and the arts. He is a frequent contributor to WNYC, Studio 360, The World, Latino USA and MTV Iggy. He is an Associate Producer for Afropop Worldwide.

This Bill Of Rights Is Going To Change My Life

Nannies, housekeepers, and elder care workers are excluded from federal benefits, but California is the third state after New York and Hawaii to enact a bill of rights for domestic workers. Reporter Emily Wilson talked to two of them.

Photo courtesy of Flickr.

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emilyheadshotEmily Wilson is a freelance reporter and producer in San Francisco. She teaches media literacy, math, and English to adults earning their GED at City College of San Francisco.

Organizing Domestic Workers In The Rest Of The Country

This year, California passed a Bill of Rights protecting domestic workers. New York and Hawaii have passed similar bills. But what is going on in the other 47 states? Andrea Cristina Mercado is the campaign director for the National Domestic Worker Alliance. She joins host Maria Hinojosa to talk about how the legacy of slavery makes it difficult for domestic workers to organize and how despite obstacles, the domestic worker movement has grown.

Photo courtesy of Dignidad Rebelde. 

C2_NatDomWorkers_Headshot_AndreaCristinaMercado_Credit_National Domestic Worker Association

Photo courtesy of National Domestic Workers Association.

Andrea Cristina Mercado is the daughter of South American immigrants, the mother of two small girls, and the new Campaign Director at the National Domestic Worker Alliance. For the past eight years Andrea has been organizing at Mujeres Unidas y Activas (MUA), a grassroots Latina immigrant women’s organization in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is one of the co-founders of the National Domestic Workers Alliance and has played a leadership role in building and coordinating the California Domestic Worker Coalition, a statewide effort to include domestic workers in labor laws.

Sabiduría: Get Your Focus On

It’s easy to get distracted. In this Sabiduría, scholar and cultural activist Dr. Marta Moreno Vega gives us a little advice about what to do when work and other life worries make you lose your focus.

marta fbMarta Moreno Vega was born in El Barrio “Spanish Harlem” of Puerto Rican parents born in Puerto Rico. Dr. Vega, an Afro Puerto Rican, has dedicated her professional life to developing culturally grounded institutions placing the history and culture of African descendants in the Diaspora in the time clock of world history. She is founder and president of the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute, an international not for profit organization located in New York City which she created in 1976.

Homemade Oakland Tamales

Carolina Santos and her mother, Rosa Oliva, make tamales, tacos, and all sorts of other food for office workers and other clients, who are usually in San Francisco. But in West Oakland, California, where they live, the corner stores that exist offer little of the fresh produce they have access to in the food business. Maria Hinojosa spends a day with them and brings us her report.

And click below to listen to Rosa Oliva share her recipe for mole Oaxaqueño, en español:

Drafting Rural Doctors

There is an increasing shortage of doctors in the rural communities of the San Joaquin Valley in California. Lisa Morehouse reports on a new program aimed at bringing new doctors to the area…and keeping them there.

Photo courtesy of  Lisa Morehouse

 

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Lisa-Morehouse-150x150 Lisa Morehouse is an award-winning independent public radio and print journalist, who’s filed for KQED’s The California Report, NPR’s Latino USA and All Things Considered, Edutopia magazine and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa.  She’s currently working on After The Gold Rush: The Future of Rural California, an audio documentary website and series. A former public school teacher, Morehouse also works with at-risk youth to produce radio diaries.

9/11: Undocumented and Uncounted (2001)

At the time of the September 11th, 2001 attacks, undocumented immigrants formed an integral part of life in and around the World Trade Center. In this story from the Latino USA archives, Michelle Garcia reports on how the attacks and their aftermath challenged them.

POSTVILLE FIVE YEARS LATER

Five years ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents closed in on a kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa and carried out the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with filmmaker Luis Argueta, director of “Abused: the Postville Raid,” a documentary about the raid’s impact on immigrant families and on the town.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image: Abused Documentary Facebook.

Luis Argueta (photo by Bea Gallardo)Luis Argueta is a film director and producer whose work spans features, documentaries, shorts and episodic TV. He has also worked as commercial director, lecturer and teacher in the United States, Europe and throughout the Americas.  Born and raised in Guatemala, Argueta is a US Citizen and has been a resident of New York since 1977. His film The Silence of Neto is the only Guatemalan film ever to have been submitted to the Academy Awards competition and he is the only Guatemalan director to have received a CLIO. In April 2009, the British newspaper The Guardian, listed Mr. Argueta as one of Guatemala’s National Living Icons, alongside Nobel Laureate Rigoberta Menchu and Singer/Songwriter Ricardo Arjona.

 

Domestic Workers and Mediators

In Massachusetts, domestic workers and employers learn to resolve disputes through mediation, instead of in court. Shannon Mullen reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Andrew Stelzer. 

ShannonShannon Mullen is a film producer and a freelance journalist based in New England, where she files news and feature stories from around the region for National Public Radio’s flagship programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as American Public Media’s Marketplace. Her work has also been published in Edible Boston, Boston Magazine, the Boston Globe Magazine and New Hampshire Magazine.

ALLA EN EL RANCHO GRANDE

In 2000, about 1400 Latino ranchers and farmers sued the US Department of Agriculture for denying them loans based on their ethnicity. Now the agency is offering $1.3 billion in compensation. But there are still many who have not applied to be compensated. KUNM’s Sara Van Note reports from Colorado.


Click here to download this week’s show.

VanNote Sara Van Note is a freelance journalist and educator based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She files locally with KUNM, and has reported on immigration and education issues. She’s inspired by the Southwest’s incredible landscapes and people, and keeps an ear out for rich accents, unexpected birdsong, and watery oases. Sara recently returned from a year in Nicaragua, where she taught kids yoga and English and shared her photos and wonderings on her personal blog and in online news outlets. Her work with a women’s community radio project in northern Nicaragua helped her develop a new understanding of the power of radio.

NORTEÑO ACADEMY

In Salinas, California, a budding classical music star comes home to teach local kids how to play something quite different…Tex-Mex norteno music…for free. Radio Bilingue’s Farida Jhabvala Romero reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the reporter.

 

Farida Jhabvala Romero reporting in Mendota, CA broccoli field Farida is a reporter for Radio Bilingüe, the National Latino Public Radio Network. She regularly covers health and the environment. She also contributes stories on California traditional artists for Radio Bilingüe’s series Raíces: Reportajes sobre Artistas del Pueblo. Prior to joining Radio Bilingüe, Farida worked as a reporter for El Mensajero, a San Francisco weekly, and other publications. She has a bachelor’s degree from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and currently lives in Alameda, California, with her husband Eric and 2-year old daughter Devika. She can be reached at farida@radiobilingue.org.

BOCADITOS: ZORAYDA’S OILS

Want to smell good enough to eat? Maybe you should look into the scents created by perfumer Zorayda Ortiz in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago. She makes scents that smell like a tamal, pan de muerto or lechon.


Click here to download this week’s show.

SONIA’S BELOVED WORLD

Maria Hinojosa talks to Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor who has written a memoir called “My Beloved World.” The book tells the story of Sotomayor’s childhood in the South Bronx and her years before the court.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Judge Sonia Sotomayor has lived the American dream. Born to a Puerto Rican family, she grew up in a public housing project in the South Bronx. Her judicial service began in October 1992 with her appointment to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York by President George H.W. Bush. President Clinton appointed Judge Sotomayor to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in 1998. She was the first Latina to serve on that court, and participated in over 3000 panel decisions, authoring roughly 400 published opinions.

Over a distinguished career that spans three decades, Judge Sotomayor has worked at almost every level of our judicial system, eventually becoming the first Hispanic, and only the third woman, to ever be appointed to the United States Supreme Court.

VINTAGE CHAVEZ

Cesar Chavez, the late Chicano labor leader, has been elevated to the status of icon, but few know the rich history from which the United Farm Workers sprang. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with author Frank Bardacke about the complex relationship between the leader and the rank and file farm workers, as documented in his book “Trampling out the Vintage: Cesar Chavez and the Two Souls of the United Farm Workers.”


Click here to download this week’s show.

Frank Bardacke was active in the student and anti-war movements in Berkeley in the 1960’s. He moved to California’s Central Coast in 1970, worked for six seasons in the Salinas Valley fields, and taught at Watsonville Adult School for twenty-five years. He is the author of Good Liberals and Great Blue Herons: Land, Labor and Politics in the Pajaro Valley, and a translator of Shadows of Tender Fury: The Letters and Communiqués of Subcomandante Marcos and the Zapatista Army of National Liberation.

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