Latino USA

Archive for the ‘Work’ Category

POSTVILLE FIVE YEARS LATER

Five years ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents closed in on a kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa and carried out the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with filmmaker Luis Argueta, director of “Abused: the Postville Raid,” a documentary about the raid’s impact on immigrant families and on the town.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image: Abused Documentary Facebook.

Luis Argueta (photo by Bea Gallardo)Luis Argueta is a film director and producer whose work spans features, documentaries, shorts and episodic TV. He has also worked as commercial director, lecturer and teacher in the United States, Europe and throughout the Americas.  Born and raised in Guatemala, Argueta is a US Citizen and has been a resident of New York since 1977. His film The Silence of Neto is the only Guatemalan film ever to have been submitted to the Academy Awards competition and he is the only Guatemalan director to have received a CLIO. In April 2009, the British newspaper The Guardian, listed Mr. Argueta as one of Guatemala’s National Living Icons, alongside Nobel Laureate Rigoberta Menchu and Singer/Songwriter Ricardo Arjona.

 

Domestic Workers and Mediators

In Massachusetts, domestic workers and employers learn to resolve disputes through mediation, instead of in court. Shannon Mullen reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Andrew Stelzer. 

ShannonShannon Mullen is a film producer and a freelance journalist based in New England, where she files news and feature stories from around the region for National Public Radio’s flagship programs, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as American Public Media’s Marketplace. Her work has also been published in Edible Boston, Boston Magazine, the Boston Globe Magazine and New Hampshire Magazine.

ALLA EN EL RANCHO GRANDE

In 2000, about 1400 Latino ranchers and farmers sued the US Department of Agriculture for denying them loans based on their ethnicity. Now the agency is offering $1.3 billion in compensation. But there are still many who have not applied to be compensated. KUNM’s Sara Van Note reports from Colorado.


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VanNote Sara Van Note is a freelance journalist and educator based in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She files locally with KUNM, and has reported on immigration and education issues. She’s inspired by the Southwest’s incredible landscapes and people, and keeps an ear out for rich accents, unexpected birdsong, and watery oases. Sara recently returned from a year in Nicaragua, where she taught kids yoga and English and shared her photos and wonderings on her personal blog and in online news outlets. Her work with a women’s community radio project in northern Nicaragua helped her develop a new understanding of the power of radio.

NORTEÑO ACADEMY

In Salinas, California, a budding classical music star comes home to teach local kids how to play something quite different…Tex-Mex norteno music…for free. Radio Bilingue’s Farida Jhabvala Romero reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the reporter.

 

Farida Jhabvala Romero reporting in Mendota, CA broccoli field Farida is a reporter for Radio Bilingüe, the National Latino Public Radio Network. She regularly covers health and the environment. She also contributes stories on California traditional artists for Radio Bilingüe’s series Raíces: Reportajes sobre Artistas del Pueblo. Prior to joining Radio Bilingüe, Farida worked as a reporter for El Mensajero, a San Francisco weekly, and other publications. She has a bachelor’s degree from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and currently lives in Alameda, California, with her husband Eric and 2-year old daughter Devika. She can be reached at farida@radiobilingue.org.

BOCADITOS: ZORAYDA’S OILS

Want to smell good enough to eat? Maybe you should look into the scents created by perfumer Zorayda Ortiz in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago. She makes scents that smell like a tamal, pan de muerto or lechon.


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SONIA’S BELOVED WORLD

Maria Hinojosa talks to Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor who has written a memoir called “My Beloved World.” The book tells the story of Sotomayor’s childhood in the South Bronx and her years before the court.


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Judge Sonia Sotomayor has lived the American dream. Born to a Puerto Rican family, she grew up in a public housing project in the South Bronx. Her judicial service began in October 1992 with her appointment to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York by President George H.W. Bush. President Clinton appointed Judge Sotomayor to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in 1998. She was the first Latina to serve on that court, and participated in over 3000 panel decisions, authoring roughly 400 published opinions.

Over a distinguished career that spans three decades, Judge Sotomayor has worked at almost every level of our judicial system, eventually becoming the first Hispanic, and only the third woman, to ever be appointed to the United States Supreme Court.

VINTAGE CHAVEZ

Cesar Chavez, the late Chicano labor leader, has been elevated to the status of icon, but few know the rich history from which the United Farm Workers sprang. Host Maria Hinojosa speaks with author Frank Bardacke about the complex relationship between the leader and the rank and file farm workers, as documented in his book “Trampling out the Vintage: Cesar Chavez and the Two Souls of the United Farm Workers.”


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Frank Bardacke was active in the student and anti-war movements in Berkeley in the 1960′s. He moved to California’s Central Coast in 1970, worked for six seasons in the Salinas Valley fields, and taught at Watsonville Adult School for twenty-five years. He is the author of Good Liberals and Great Blue Herons: Land, Labor and Politics in the Pajaro Valley, and a translator of Shadows of Tender Fury: The Letters and Communiqués of Subcomandante Marcos and the Zapatista Army of National Liberation.

NOTICIANDO: NAFTA, DO WE HAFTA?

The impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement on economies, industries and labor markets across the three countries involved is still a hot issue among experts. Dean Baker, co-director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research weighs the pros and cons of NAFTA, 20 years later.


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Dean Baker is the author of The End of Loser Liberalism: Making Markets Progressive, Taking Economics Seriously, False Profits: Recovering from the Bubble Economy, Plunder and Blunder: The Rise and Fall of the Bubble Economy, Social Security: The Phony Crisis (with Mark Weisbrot), and The Benefits of Full Employment (with Jared Bernstein).

He was the editor of Getting Prices Right: The Debate Over the Consumer Price Index, which was a winner of a Choice Book Award as one of the outstanding academic books of the year. He appears frequently on TV and radio programs, including CNN, CBS News, PBS NewsHour, and National Public Radio. His blog, Beat the Press, features commentary on economic reporting. He received his B.A. from Swarthmore College and his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

NOTICIANDO: RECESSION RECOVERY

We’ve seen a lot of coverage about immigrant workers being hit the hardest by the recession, but what about recovery? A recent report by the Urban Institute found that immigrant workers are recovering faster than native-born workers despite suffering greater unemployment. For more on the report, we speak to María Enchautegui, Senior Associate at the Urban Institute in Washington, DC.


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María E. Enchautegui is an economist with expertise in the area of immigration. She also studies the working conditions of low-wage work. Prior to joining the Urban Institute she served as Senior Economic Advisor to the Assistant Secretary for Policy at the Department of Labor. She also served as professor of Economics at the University of Puerto Rico, where she did her undergraduate work. She holds a PHD in Economics from Florida State University.

Enchautegui is particularly interested in the economics of immigration from the standpoint of the relationship between different population groups in the labor market, the functioning of the low-wage labor market and the factors that promote employment. She has published on the economic impacts of immigration, job quality, nonstandard work schedules, and informal work.

UP IN THE AIR WITH DAISY

Daisy Rosario takes us inside the world of balloon docents where she riles up the crowds and shares facts about the inflatable giants of the New York City Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Flickr.

Daisy Rosario is a producer, reporter and comedian, but to keep it simple she’d tell you she’s good with words. She’s a proud Brooklyn native who works with The Moth and Upright Citizens Brigade. She recently interned with WNYC’s Radiolab. A graduate of NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, Daisy has held a number of odd jobs in the name of curiosity. She longs to be the quasi-love child of Manny Pacquiao, Theodore Roosevelt, and Carl Sagan, but what do you do with that?

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