Latino USA

Posts Tagged ‘Arizona’

NEWS TACO: CH-CH-CHANGES

We speak to News Taco Editor Victor Landa for a roundup on recent changes in U.S. politics: from Republicans regrouping in Florida to signs of hope for culturally relevant courses in Arizona schools.


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Victor Landa is the founder and editor of NewsTaco, a website that provides news, analysis and critique from a Latino perspective. He worked as a writer and editor for 30 years, mostly with Telemundo and Univisión. Landa also contributed to the San Antonio Express-News, and he is an adviser on media strategy, message crafting, storytelling and public speaking.

ELECTIONS NATIONWIDE

As the elections wrap up, we have briefings from key areas around the country where the Latino vote had a key impact on the election – and also reflects America’s changing demographics.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Colorlines (creative commons).

Ashley Lopez is a reporter for WLRN-Miami Herald News. She also splits her time as a reporter/blogger for the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting and as a local print reporter for The Miami Herald. Previously, Lopez was a reporter/blogger for The Florida Independent — a nonprofit news blog that covered Florida politics and public policy. A native Miamian, Lopez graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a journalism degree. She also interned for Talking Points Memo and an NPR affiliate in Durham, North Carolina.

Robbie Harris is WVTF/RADIO IQ‘s New River Valley Bureau Chief. Based in Blacksburg, Robbie covers the New River Valley and southwestern Virginia. She is a former news director of WBEZ/ Chicago Public Radio and WHYY in Philadelphia, where she led award-winning news teams and creative projects. She has also worked in public and commercial television, as well as print journalism.

News Director Peter O’Dowd leads a newsroom that includes reporters in seven Southwestern bureaus. His work has aired on The BBC, NPR’s Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation, and American Public Media’s Marketplace. He’s covered technology, the housing bubble and the constant flap over immigration policy that keeps Arizona in the national spotlight. Peter began his radio career at Wyoming Public Radio. He has a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, and he’s taught English in Tokyo, Japan.

ALL POLITICS ARE LOCAL

In Arizona, the presidential race drives Latino voters and activists less than local issues, such as the state’s immigration law and the Maricopa Country sheriff’s race. Reported by Valeria Fernandez of the Feet in Two Worlds project.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Jocelyn Gonzales.

Valeria Fernández, a native of Uruguay, has been reporting on Arizona’s immigrant community and the many angles and faces of the immigration debate for the ten years she has been in the U.S. As a senior reporter for La Voz Newspaper, Fernández produced in depth features about the plight of unaccompanied minors mistakenly charged as adults for crossing the U.S. border. The National Association of Hispanic Publications named Fernández “Latina Journalist of the Year” in 2004. She also won a national award for her series on the Maricopa County Sheriff’s immigration sweeps in Hispanic neighborhoods in 2009. Fernández is a versatile journalist that currently freelances for CNN Español, CNN International, Radio Bilingue, Inter Press Service, La Opinión, New America Media, and the Arizona Republic. Freelancing for the Phoenix New Times, she recently broke stories on the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office practice of shackling pregnant women during labor.

Immigration News Picks: Latino Voters Might Swing Arizona, Utah Has Had Just 745 DACA Applicants

In Arizona, backlash against anti-immigration legislation SB 1070 could mean a major increase in Latinos voting for Democratic candidates. A Latino Decisions poll of Latino voters in Arizona finds that eighty percent would vote for Obama, while just fourteen percent said they would vote for Mitt Romney. This is in a state where Latino voters are much more enthusiastic about voting than the national average.

Speaking at the launch of the poll sponsored by America’s Voice, Rodolfo Espino, Associate Professor of Political Science at Arizona State University, explained the results:

“Latino voters in Arizona expressed frustration towards both political parties immediately following the passage of SB1070. As we head toward the 2012 Presidential election, the feelings of frustration by Latinos have tilted more against Republican candidates and enthusiasm for Democratic candidates has moved up. This has made the general elections in Arizona more competitive than many initially anticipated.”

Check out their interactive Latino Vote Map at latinovotemap.org and our conversation with a Latino Decisions analyst from last month about Latino candidates and their influence on Latino voting patterns.

While Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program or DACA has proven popular nationwide with 82,000 applicants in its first month, the response in Utah has been surprisingly small.

Marjorie Cortez, in the Deseret News reports:

“Fear of immigration officials is keeping young illegal immigrants away from the federal government’s deferred action program, with only 745 people applying in Utah during the first month of the program.”

Virginia, by comparison, had 1,954 applicants during the same time period, New York 6,637 and California 20,786. Cortez quotes Utah Attorney General Mark Shurtleff, a DACA supporter, saying that applications in his state are lower than anticipated due to uncertainty over the election. Republican candidate Mitt Romney has said he would repeal the program if he is elected.

Fi2W is supported by the New York Community Trust and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation with additional support from the Ralph E. Odgen Foundation and the Sirus Fund. Image courtesy of flickr.

Aaron Leaf is a freelance writer and editor who has reported on human rights issues from Zambia, Liberia, Canada and Peru. He is a graduate of Ryerson University and the former editor of Ricepaper, a journal of Asian Canadian arts and culture.

Walking Through Tent City

Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Maricopa County, Arizona is on trial now in a federal court in Phoenix, charged with civil rights violations. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa recently paid a visit to Arpaio and the sheriff showed her around his unorthodox open air jail, which some critics call inhumane but the Sheriff defends as tough on crime.


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Here’s more photos from Tent City:



You On SB 1070: Listener Comments

Last week, Maria Hinojosa shared her thoughts on the Supreme Court decision on Arizona’s immigration law. Here’s what some of you had to say.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Radia.

SB 1070: BEHIND THE LAW

The Supreme Court’s mixed decision on Arizona’s immigration law prompted both skepticism and debate. The Court ruled against most of the law’s provisions but left one standing–the one known as the “papers, please” provision, which allows state and local police to question individuals on their immigration status. How did Latino groups in Arizona react? Seth Freed Wessler of Colorlines reports. Click here to read Seth’s work.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Colorlines.

Seth Freed Wessler is an award-winning journalist who’s reported on immigration, the safety net, criminal justice and the human fallout of the financial collapse. He lives in New York where he works as an investigative reporter for Colorlines.com and a senior researcher at the Applied Research Center.Seth was recently awarded the Hillman Prize for his groundbreaking Colorlines.com investigation on deported parents who lose their children to foster care. In April, he was in the Supreme Court for oral arguments in Arizona v. United States, the SB 1070 case.

SB 1070: BEYOND THE LAW

What does the “papers, please” provision of SB 1070 mean for Latinos? Anthony Romero, the executive director for the American Civil Liberties Union, talks to host Maria Hinojosa and outlines how the Supreme Court ruled on Arizona immigration law SB 1070, why he considers it legalized racial profiling, as well as next steps on the community and legal fronts.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of Favianna Rodriguez.

Anthony D. Romero is the Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, the nation’s premier defender of liberty and individual freedom. He took the helm of the organization just four days before the September 11, 2001 attacks.  Romero also led the ACLU in establishing the John Adams Project, a joint effort with the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers to assist the under-resourced military defense lawyers in the Guantánamo military commissions. Born in New York City to parents who hailed from Puerto Rico, Romero was the first in his family to graduate from high school. He is a graduate of Stanford University Law School and Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public Policy and International Affairs. He is a member of the New York Bar Association and has sat on numerous nonprofit boards.

Hinojosa on SB 1070

This week, host Maria Hinojosa shares her thoughts, hopes and fears about the Supreme Court decision.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Precious Knowledge

The Mexican American Studies Program at a local high school in Tucson, Arizona helped increase the Latino graduation rate and the number of students who went to college. The recently banned program is now the subject of a new documentary, Precious Knowledge, to air next week on PBS. We speak to Eren Isabel McGinnis, the co-director of the film, and Alanna Castro, one of the students who took part in the program.

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Eren Isabel McGinnis has produced award-winning documentaries for PBS and other international media outlets for several years. She co-founded Caf Sisters Productions with Christine Fugate, an all-woman production company. She also co-founded Dos Vatos Productions with Ari Luis Palos.

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