A Tale of Two Israelites

The New York borough of Brooklyn is the most Jewish place on Earth outside of Israel, and nowhere is that more apparent than in the heavily Orthodox Jewish neighborhood of Borough Park. Yet in the middle of this Jewish universe is a tiny Mexican church called La Iglesia de Dios Israelita—in English, the Israelite Church of God. The church is an offshoot of the Church of God (Seventh Day), which draws much of its doctrine and symbolism from the Old Testament, the central scriptures of Judaism. The church displays Stars of David, members can sing the Israeli national anthem in Spanish and the adults even refer to themselves as “Israelites.” For the children growing up inside this church, who and what defines terms like “Israelite” and “Jew” can be confusing—leading to a slew of questions from these kids about their Jewish neighbors who seem so distant.

Featured image via Debbie Nathan

This is Bushwick

It’s a web comedy series about a group of friends living in the fast changing Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn. The new season of “East Willy B” premiers March 20th. Host María Hinojosa speaks with producer and actress Julia Grob about the “new generation Latino” sensibility of the show.

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Click here to download this week’s show. 

JuliaGrobHeadshot Julia Ahumada Grob is an actor, writer, and creative producer of Chilean and Jewish heritage. She is the co-creator and lead actor of “East WillyB.” Named one of 25 emerging theater artists by Kevin Spacey, Julia has appeared on screen opposite Rosie Perez, Andre Royo (“The Wire”), Jaime Tirelli (“Girl Fight”) and onstage opposite Kathy Najimy, Billy Crudup, and Jason Biggs. Julia is a 2011 Fellow of the National Association of Latino Independent Producers (NALIP), Latino Producers Academy and Latino Artist Mentoring Program. Julia holds a BA from Brown University and has studied acting with the Labyrinth Theater Company, Steppenwolf Theater Company and at Upright Citizen’s Brigade.

NOTICIANDO: VOCES

Mexican American women train to compete in Mexico’s Charro contest, raw poetry emerges from the Brooklyn projects, modernist architecture in Cuba, and an inside look at the masked men of Mexico’s Lucha Libre. These are documentary subjects on VOCES, a Latino arts and documentary showcase on public television. We speak to Sandie Pedlow, executive director of Latino Public Broadcasting.

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Click here to download this week’s show.

Sandie Viquez Pedlow is the Executive Director of Latino Public broadcasting overseeing the development, production, and distribution of public media content that is representative of Latino people or address issues concerning Latino Americans. She brings to this position over 20 years experience in program development, production, and the development of international public media initiatives. Most recently she was Director, Station Relations for PBS Education where she led the implementation and marketing of PBS online and digital media products and services. Prior to PBS, Pedlow was Director of Programming Strategies, Associate Director of Cultural, Drama and Arts Programming, and Senior Program Officer with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for 10 years. She managed the development and funding of national public broadcasting programs which addressed social and diversity issues, history, the arts and many aspects of American culture. Pedlow was a key member of the CPB team that managed the founding of LPB. Prior to this work, Pedlow developed and produced documentaries, cultural/arts television programs for SCETV and was the U.S. National Coordinator for INPUT, an international public television conference with more than 35 participating