Latino USA

Posts Tagged ‘California’

Health Care Reform Leaves Undocumented Uninsured

The Affordable Care Act does not actually cover everyone. Even in California, the state that leads in enrollment, an estimated one million people cannot access health care – undocumented immigrants. Many are undocumented immigrants. We visit Sonoma County’s Graton Day Labor Center, an advocacy and training group that tries to address this community’s needs.

Photo by Lisa Morehouse

 

 

Lack Of Ethnic Studies In California Schools

High schools all over the United States are leaving out a large chunk of American history. American teenagers learn about a history that is Euro-centric and often don’t learn about the rich histories of other racial and ethnic groups. In California, 70 per cent of high schoolers are students of color. Yet only one in 15 schools offers ethnic studies curricula. In fact, most high school students in the US will not see an ethnic studies class, despite evidence that kids, especially kids of color, benefit greatly from learning diverse histories.

Ethnic studies is a controversial topic in high schools. The Texas board of Education recently voted to develop ethnic studies textbooks, but didn’t require schools to use them. And Arizona passed a law banning Mexican-American studies, but that case is being appealed in Federal Court.

Reporter Valerie Hamilton went to Animo South Los Angeles High School  where ethnic studies is a required course, just like math and English.

Photo courtesy of reporter. 

LAST DAYS OF DUROVILLE

Thousands of farmworker families in California’s eastern Coachella Valley live in mobile home parks. They’re cheap and convenient to the farms but many of them are in terrible conditions. One of them –Duroville– is closing by court order and most of its residents are moving into a new park built with county money allocated before major budget cuts. In the new budget reality, some advocates say don’t close the bad parks –let them stay open and renovate slowly. Lisa Morehouse reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Lisa Morehouse. 

Lisa-Morehouse-150x150Lisa Morehouse is an award-winning independent public radio and print journalist, who’s filed for KQED’s The California Report, NPR’s Latino USA and All Things Considered, Edutopia magazine and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa.  She’s currently working on After The Gold Rush: The Future of Rural California, an audio documentary website and series. A former public school teacher, Morehouse also works with at-risk youth to produce radio diaries.

Chorus Lines

The world premiere of a choral piece called “Santos” opens in California. The star singers: the teenage girls of the San Francisco Girls Chorus. Radio Bilingüe’s Farida Jhabvala Romero reports.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Farida Jhabvala. 

Farida-Jhabvala-Romero-reporting-in-Mendota-CA-broccoli-field-150x150Farida is a reporter for Radio Bilingüe, the National Latino Public Radio Network. She regularly covers health and the environment. She also contributes stories on California traditional artists for Radio Bilingüe’s series Raíces: Reportajes sobre Artistas del Pueblo. Prior to joining Radio Bilingüe, Farida worked as a reporter for El Mensajero, a San Francisco weekly, and other publications. She has a bachelor’s degree from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and currently lives in Alameda, California, with her husband Eric and 2-year old daughter Devika. She can be reached at farida@radiobilingue.org.

“The Languages of Natividad” with Captions

THIS WEEK’S SHOW:

Imagine not only not speaking English but also speaking a language like Mixteco—how would you go to the doctor? A new hospital in Salinas has found a fix for this. And this month’s Harper’s features an article called “This Land Is Not Your Land,” about labor migration in America’s heartland. We speak to its author. Are you ready for Oscar weekend? We are! We go Hollywood and talk to acting powerhouse Miriam Colon, who tells us about her starring role in the new film Bless Me, Ultima.

ABOUT CAPTIONING:

Latino USA, the foremost Latino voice in public media and the longest running Latino-focused program on radio, is the first radio program to commence equal-access distribution via Captioning for Radio. “Research has shown that Latino children have a higher incidence of hearing loss and deafness than other populations,” according to Latino USA’s Anchor & Executive Producer Maria Hinojosa. “When the opportunity to break this sound barrier came to our attention, we were pleased to embrace this new technology developed by NPR Labs and Towson University for the thousands of Latinos with serious hearing loss.”

The International Center for Accessible Radio Technology (ICART), a strategic alliance between NPR and Towson University, is co-directed by Mike Starling of NPR and Ellyn Sheffield of Towson University.

For each week’s captioning, check back on http://latinousa.org/captions.

 

THE LANGUAGES OF NATIVIDAD

Many of the new farmworkers in California’s Salinas Valley are indigenous. They speak dozens of languages and often, no Spanish at all. One hospital in the Salinas Valley is figuring out how to provide services in languages like Mixteca, Zapoteca and Triqui. Reporter Lisa Morehouse has this story.


Click here to download this week’s show. 

Image: Dr. Peter Chandler, Victor Sosa, Petra Leon, and Angelica Isidro go from English, to Spanish, to Mixteco. Leon, a Mixteco speaker, plans to give birth at Natividad in a couple of months. Photo courtesy of Lisa Morehouse.

 

Lisa-Morehouse

Lisa Morehouse is a public radio and print journalist, who has filed for National Public Radio, American Public Media, KQED Public Radio, Edutopia, and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa. For the last year she’s reported and produced a public radio series New Harvest: The Future of Small Town California KQED’s The California Report. KALW is currently airing pieces she created while teaching radio production to incarcerated youth.

ON DUMPING GROUNDS

What can farmworker communities do when they are living next to an unregulated waste dump that’s on Native American land? Reporter Ruxandra Guidi brings us a story about the dilemma of garbage on lands with little regulation.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image by Ruxandra Guidi.

Ruxandra Guidi is KPCC’s Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.
Guidi has a decade of experience working in public radio, print, and multimedia and has reported throughout California, the Caribbean, South and Central America, as well as Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico border region.

Ruxandra is a recipient of Johns Hopkins University’s International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellowship, which took her to Haiti for a series of stories about development aid and human rights in 2008. That year, she was also a finalist for the Livingston Award for International Reporting, given to U.S. journalists under 35 years of age.

After earning a Master’s degree in journalism from U.C. Berkeley in 2002, she got her break in public radio by assisting independent radio producers The Kitchen Sisters. A couple of years later, she did field reporting and production work for the BBC public radio news program, The World. Her stories focused on Latin America, human rights, rural communities, immigration, popular culture and music.
Most recently, Guidi was a border reporter for the Fronteras Desk, a collaboration between public radio stations throughout the Southwest and U.S.-Mexico border.

Throughout her journalism career, Guidi has also produced magazine features and radio documentaries for the BBC World Service in Spanish, National Public Radio, The Walrus Magazine, Guernica Magazine, Virginia Quarterly Review, World Vision Report, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s Dispatches and Marketplace radio programs.

She’s a native of Caracas, Venezuela.

Latinos And The Obesity Epidemic

Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable deaths in the US after cigarette smoking. Latinos are especially hard hit, developing diabetes and other obesity related health problems at high rates. Reporter Nova Safo visits the predominantly Latino city of Santa Ana, California to see how biology, economics and environment all contribute to the problem.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Nova Safo is a Los Angeles-based reporter who covers a wide variety of topics ranging from the Hollywood entertainment industry, to visual arts, culture, politics, policy, health, science, the future of energy, economics, and the occasional massive wildfire.
His reporting has been heard on NPR’s various newsmagazines and other public radio programs, and published online by Yahoo! News and others. He is the recipient of Hearst journalism awards for radio reporting, as well as an NLGJA/RTNDA award for excellence in online journalism.

Luis Alfaro’s Bruja: Medea in the Mission

Emily Wilson takes us to see Los Angeles poet and playwright Luis Alfaro’s latest play, “Bruja,” where he transports Euripides’ Medea to San Francisco’s Mission district. In it, Alfaro poses questions about what is gained and what is lost by immigrants in a new country.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Emily Wilson is a freelance reporter and producer in San Francisco. She teaches media literacy, math, and English to adults earning their GED at City College of San Francisco.

Noticiando: Violence in Anaheim, California

After police shot 24-year-old Manuel Diaz while running away unarmed on July 21, neighbors in Anaheim, California began to challenge police for overuse of force.  In response, police fired weapons at the angry residents, and unleashed a dog that charged a man who was on the floor next to a woman and child on a stroller. Several people were injured. For more about what led to this confrontation, we speak to Gustavo Arellano, the editor of the alternative newspaper the OC Weekly. 


Click here to download this week’s show.

Gustavo Arellano is editor of the OC Weekly, an alternative newspaper in California. Gustavo also writes “¡Ask a Mexican!,” a nationally syndicated and award-winning column. His most recent book is “Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America.”

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