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Posts Tagged ‘California’

Health Care Reform Leaves Undocumented Uninsured

The Affordable Care Act does not actually cover everyone. Even in California, the state that leads in enrollment, an estimated one million people cannot access health care – undocumented immigrants. Many are undocumented immigrants. We visit Sonoma County’s Graton Day Labor Center, an advocacy and training group that tries to address this community’s needs.

Photo by Lisa Morehouse



Lack Of Ethnic Studies In California Schools

High schools all over the United States are leaving out a large chunk of American history. American teenagers learn about a history that is Euro-centric and often don’t learn about the rich histories of other racial and ethnic groups. In California, 70 per cent of high schoolers are students of color. Yet only one in 15 schools offers ethnic studies curricula. In fact, most high school students in the US will not see an ethnic studies class, despite evidence that kids, especially kids of color, benefit greatly from learning diverse histories.

Ethnic studies is a controversial topic in high schools. The Texas board of Education recently voted to develop ethnic studies textbooks, but didn’t require schools to use them. And Arizona passed a law banning Mexican-American studies, but that case is being appealed in Federal Court.

Reporter Valerie Hamilton went to Animo South Los Angeles High School  where ethnic studies is a required course, just like math and English.

Photo courtesy of reporter. 


Thousands of farmworker families in California’s eastern Coachella Valley live in mobile home parks. They’re cheap and convenient to the farms but many of them are in terrible conditions. One of them –Duroville– is closing by court order and most of its residents are moving into a new park built with county money allocated before major budget cuts. In the new budget reality, some advocates say don’t close the bad parks –let them stay open and renovate slowly. Lisa Morehouse reports.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Lisa Morehouse. 

Lisa-Morehouse-150x150Lisa Morehouse is an award-winning independent public radio and print journalist, who’s filed for KQED’s The California Report, NPR’s Latino USA and All Things Considered, Edutopia magazine and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa.  She’s currently working on After The Gold Rush: The Future of Rural California, an audio documentary website and series. A former public school teacher, Morehouse also works with at-risk youth to produce radio diaries.

Chorus Lines

The world premiere of a choral piece called “Santos” opens in California. The star singers: the teenage girls of the San Francisco Girls Chorus. Radio Bilingüe’s Farida Jhabvala Romero reports.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Farida Jhabvala. 

Farida-Jhabvala-Romero-reporting-in-Mendota-CA-broccoli-field-150x150Farida is a reporter for Radio Bilingüe, the National Latino Public Radio Network. She regularly covers health and the environment. She also contributes stories on California traditional artists for Radio Bilingüe’s series Raíces: Reportajes sobre Artistas del Pueblo. Prior to joining Radio Bilingüe, Farida worked as a reporter for El Mensajero, a San Francisco weekly, and other publications. She has a bachelor’s degree from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and currently lives in Alameda, California, with her husband Eric and 2-year old daughter Devika. She can be reached at


Many of the new farmworkers in California’s Salinas Valley are indigenous. They speak dozens of languages and often, no Spanish at all. One hospital in the Salinas Valley is figuring out how to provide services in languages like Mixteca, Zapoteca and Triqui. Reporter Lisa Morehouse has this story.

Click here to download this week’s show. 

Image: Dr. Peter Chandler, Victor Sosa, Petra Leon, and Angelica Isidro go from English, to Spanish, to Mixteco. Leon, a Mixteco speaker, plans to give birth at Natividad in a couple of months. Photo courtesy of Lisa Morehouse.



Lisa Morehouse is a public radio and print journalist, who has filed for National Public Radio, American Public Media, KQED Public Radio, Edutopia, and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa. For the last year she’s reported and produced a public radio series New Harvest: The Future of Small Town California KQED’s The California Report. KALW is currently airing pieces she created while teaching radio production to incarcerated youth.


What can farmworker communities do when they are living next to an unregulated waste dump that’s on Native American land? Reporter Ruxandra Guidi brings us a story about the dilemma of garbage on lands with little regulation.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image by Ruxandra Guidi.

Ruxandra Guidi is KPCC’s Immigration and Emerging Communities Reporter.
Guidi has a decade of experience working in public radio, print, and multimedia and has reported throughout California, the Caribbean, South and Central America, as well as Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico border region.

Ruxandra is a recipient of Johns Hopkins University’s International Reporting Project (IRP) Fellowship, which took her to Haiti for a series of stories about development aid and human rights in 2008. That year, she was also a finalist for the Livingston Award for International Reporting, given to U.S. journalists under 35 years of age.

After earning a Master’s degree in journalism from U.C. Berkeley in 2002, she got her break in public radio by assisting independent radio producers The Kitchen Sisters. A couple of years later, she did field reporting and production work for the BBC public radio news program, The World. Her stories focused on Latin America, human rights, rural communities, immigration, popular culture and music.
Most recently, Guidi was a border reporter for the Fronteras Desk, a collaboration between public radio stations throughout the Southwest and U.S.-Mexico border.

Throughout her journalism career, Guidi has also produced magazine features and radio documentaries for the BBC World Service in Spanish, National Public Radio, The Walrus Magazine, Guernica Magazine, Virginia Quarterly Review, World Vision Report, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s Dispatches and Marketplace radio programs.

She’s a native of Caracas, Venezuela.

Latinos And The Obesity Epidemic

Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable deaths in the US after cigarette smoking. Latinos are especially hard hit, developing diabetes and other obesity related health problems at high rates. Reporter Nova Safo visits the predominantly Latino city of Santa Ana, California to see how biology, economics and environment all contribute to the problem.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Nova Safo is a Los Angeles-based reporter who covers a wide variety of topics ranging from the Hollywood entertainment industry, to visual arts, culture, politics, policy, health, science, the future of energy, economics, and the occasional massive wildfire.
His reporting has been heard on NPR’s various newsmagazines and other public radio programs, and published online by Yahoo! News and others. He is the recipient of Hearst journalism awards for radio reporting, as well as an NLGJA/RTNDA award for excellence in online journalism.

Luis Alfaro’s Bruja: Medea in the Mission

Emily Wilson takes us to see Los Angeles poet and playwright Luis Alfaro’s latest play, “Bruja,” where he transports Euripides’ Medea to San Francisco’s Mission district. In it, Alfaro poses questions about what is gained and what is lost by immigrants in a new country.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Emily Wilson is a freelance reporter and producer in San Francisco. She teaches media literacy, math, and English to adults earning their GED at City College of San Francisco.

Noticiando: Violence in Anaheim, California

After police shot 24-year-old Manuel Diaz while running away unarmed on July 21, neighbors in Anaheim, California began to challenge police for overuse of force.  In response, police fired weapons at the angry residents, and unleashed a dog that charged a man who was on the floor next to a woman and child on a stroller. Several people were injured. For more about what led to this confrontation, we speak to Gustavo Arellano, the editor of the alternative newspaper the OC Weekly. 

Click here to download this week’s show.

Gustavo Arellano is editor of the OC Weekly, an alternative newspaper in California. Gustavo also writes “¡Ask a Mexican!,” a nationally syndicated and award-winning column. His most recent book is “Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America.”

Know Your Pro: Picture Perfect

Matt Armendariz travels all over the world to transform delectable dishes into photographs that look good enough to eat. If you’re a foodie who consumes cookbooks and food magazines, you’ve probably come across his handiwork. He tells us how he came by his shooting skills from his home and studio in Long Beach, California.

Do you know a pro we should know?

We’re looking for people with uncommon jobs: tightrope walkers, road kill disposers, chewing gum testers. We’d love to hear your suggestions for people we should profile. You can write us online, in the comments below; send us an email at; or call our listener line at 646-571-1228.

Click here to download this week’s show.

F‪or the past 20 years Matt Armendariz been immersed in food in one way or another. As a former graphic designer and art director in the food industry he surrounded himself with great food before branching out into photography and blogging. He began his blog in 2005 as a way to share his personal take on food and those behind-the-scenes moments I experienced in his work. His first cookbook called On A Stick! was released by Quirk in May 2011.

You On SB 1070: Listener Comments

Last week, Maria Hinojosa shared her thoughts on the Supreme Court decision on Arizona’s immigration law. Here’s what some of you had to say.

Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Radia.

A Tree Grows in Watts

Urban grit and natural beauty exist side by side in a community garden in LA’s Jordan Downs Housing projects. Go on an audio tour of this garden as part of Latino USA’s Radio Nature series.

RadioNature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI Foundation.

Click here to download this week’s show.

To see an audio slideshow, click below. You can make it full-screen to see it better:

Tena Rubio is an award-winning radio journalist based in San Francisco and Los Angeles. She’s a frequent contributor to NPR’s Latino USA and is the former host & executive producer of the nationally-syndicated show Making Contact. A former TV news writer and producer, she is currently a member of the board of directors for the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR).






Blair Wells is a Los Angeles-based photographer whose journey with camera-in-hand began in 2002, using throw-away Kodaks to visually articulate his experience living in Central L.A. His love of documentary photography has led him to capture the face and heart of social issues, including projects featuring post-Katrina New Orleans day-workers, the everyday moments of a Santa Barbara homeless family and health issues of kids living near the Port of Los Angeles. Blair has also organized participatory photography projects involving the deaf community, as well as teenagers with autism. His projects have given participants an opportunity to express themselves in new and profound ways. Through it all, the human condition — the struggles and successes of everyday people — remains the single most compelling subject of his work.







Noticiando: NALEO In Review

The annual convention for the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials is a who’s who of Latino political influencers, and a good place for politicians to test the waters on the Latino vote. The convention this year was in Orlando, Florida, a hotly contested state. We speak with political reporter and analyst Pilar Marrero from the newspaper La Opinión, who attended the convention, about the stump speeches and surprises there.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Pilar Marrero is a journalist who for 25 years has extensively covered the areas of city government, immigration and state and national politics. She works for La Opinión as a senior reporter and it’s a regular commentator for radio and television in both spanish and english media. She´s the author of “El Despertar del Sueño Americano” published by Penguing Books and now on sale. The english version of the book, Killing the American Dream, comes out October 2 published by Pallgrave McMillan. Marrero lives in Los Angeles.

Soaring Skies

Jose Sainz, a master kite maker and flyer from San Diego talks to Jocelyn Frank about his fascination with the majesty and power of the wind.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Jocelyn Frank is an independent radio journalist, sound artist and musician. She’s produced and reported internationally for NPR and BBC Radio 4 and helped to develop and launch the successful UK-facing BBC Radio program Americana. She’s the creative director of Voices of Health; an audio project that documents the stories of DC residents living with HIV and AIDS. Voices of Health can be heard online and through listening stations installed in public spaces across the District of Columbia.

Here’s a video of Jose flying his kites:


LA Beat: Covering the Riots

In 1992 Hector Tobar and Cheryl Devall covered the unrest after the Rodney King verdict from the Los Angeles streets. Both journalists discuss the racial and economic tensions in the city that sparked the unrest and how LA has changed since.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Photo courtesy of


Cheryl Devall is a senior editor for Southern California Public Radio. She’s one of several responsible for supervising, editing and planning coverage with SCPR’s accomplished radio reporting staff. Cheryl brings to the task many years’ experience as an editor at public radio’s “Marketplace” and as a reporter – including 11 years with National Public Radio and with newspapers including the San Jose Mercury News, the Chicago Tribune and the Louisville Courier-Journal

Héctor Tobar is a Los Angeles author and journalist, whose work examines the evolving and interdependent relationship between Latin America and the United States.T obar is the author of The Tattooed Soldier, a novel set in the impoverished immigrant neighborhoods of Los Angeles in the weeks before the riots, and in Guatemala during the years of military dictatorship there. In 2006, Tobar was named one of the 100 Most Influential Hispanics in the United States by Hispanic Business magazine.


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