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Posts Tagged ‘deportation’

“Deportation Orphans” In Oregon

This story is a heart-rending depiction of what a family goes through when a mother is deported. We meet kids not unlike most any kids you’d meet, with one exception: their mother lives hundreds of miles away. It’s forced them to grow up faster, and left them in the care of their grandmother, who is undocumented. There are enough children living like this now that there’s a term for them: deportation orphans.

 

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JordanaGustafson

A Mother Of “Deportation Orphans”

We hear the story of Liliana Ramos, a deportee living in Tijuana, Mexico. Her children live hundreds of miles away in Oregon. She’s as involved as she can be, calling to remind them to wear scarves and hats when it’s cold out. But she’s had to start over in a strange town and join a community of mothers who can’t sleep at night for worrying about their children. She moved to Mexico 2 years ago after her deportation.

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JordanaGustafsonJordana Gustafson is a freelance reporter based in Oregon. She began her radio career at WBUR in Boston and has reported and produced for numerous outlets, including NPR, Marketplace and This American Life. Jordana graduated from Connecticut College. She was a member of the WUNC-Chapel Hill team that won the 2006 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Broadcast News Award for the series Understanding Poverty. In 2010, she and her colleagues were awarded the Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society of Professional Journalists for their documentary series, The Arab World’s Demographic Dilemma. Jordana is a 2013 immigration reporting fellow with the Institute for Justice and Journalism. She speaks fluent Spanish, and she recently rode her bike from Slovenia to Spain. She was born and raised in Ojai, California.

“Voluntary Departure?”

The ACLU filed a lawsuit last week against the U.S. government alleging that immigration officers are pressuring undocumented immigrants into signing their own deportation orders and waiving their rights to appear before an immigration judge. John Carlos Frey reports.

Photo: Family victim of coerced deportation. Courtesy of Rebecca Rauber.


john-carlos-frey-cropped_150-122x150John Carlos Frey is a freelance investigative reporter and documentary filmmaker based in Los Angeles. His investigative work has been featured on the 60 Minutes episode, “The All American Canal;” a three-part series for PBS entitled “Crossing the Line;” and several episodes of Dan Rather Reports, “Angel of the Desert,” and “Operation Streamline.” In 2011 Frey documented the journey of Mexican migrants across the US-Mexico border and walked for days in the Arizona desert risking his own life for the documentary Life and Death on the Border”. John Carlos Frey has also written articles for the Los Angeles Times, the Huffington Post, Salon, Need to Know online, the Washington Monthly, and El Diario (in Spanish). Frey’s documentary films include The Invisible Mexicans of Deer Canyon (2007), The Invisible Chapel (2008), and The 800 Mile Wall (2009). He is the 2012 recipient of the Scripps Howard Award and the Sigma Delta Chi award for his Investigative Fund/PBS reporting on the excessive use of force by the US Border Patrol.

Noticiando: Deportations and Adoption

In 2007, Guatemalan immigrant Encarnacion Bail Romero was detained at an immigration raid where she worked. By the time she was released, her six-month-old U.S.-born son was handed to another family for adoption, and his name was changed from Carlos to Jameson against her will. For more on Romero’s fight for her child’s custody, we speak to Michelle Brané, the Director of Detention and Asylum at the Women’s Refugee Commission.


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Michelle Brané is one of the nation’s foremost experts on U.S. immigration detention and reform. She is the Director of the Detention and Asylum program at the Women’s Refugee Commission, and she advocates for the critical protection needs of immigrant women, children and other vulnerable migrant populations in the United States. She authored the 2007 Women’s Refugee Commission landmark report on family detention, Locking Up Family Values and the 2009 report on unaccompanied migrant children, Halfway Home, and is the senior editor of all the Detention and Asylum Program’s reports. Ms. Brané is an attorney with more than 25 years of experience working on immigration and human rights issues.

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The federal immigration enforcement program called Secure Communities went into effect recently in New York, and under the program, information about people arrested by local police can be turned over to U.S. Immigration and potentially lead to their deportation. We speak to Lucía Gomez-Jimenez, the executive director of La Fuente’s New York and Long Island Civic Participation Project, an organization that focuses on immigrant and workers’ rights issues.

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Lucía Gomez-Jimenez is the executive director of La Fuente’s New York and Long Island Civic Participation Project, an organization that focuses on immigrant and worker rights issues. She was previously the Community Affairs representative for New York State Senator Gustavo Rivera and a Policy Fellow for the National Institute for Latino Policy (NILP) since 2009. She also served as the Assistant to the Governor for Community Affairs for Governor David Paterson of New York.

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