Latino USA

Posts Tagged ‘education’

Into the Wild… New World

For many students, summertime means graduation time. Getting into college is already a task on its own. But what about getting a job? We hear from three Latino graduates from Missouri and North Carolina about what it meant to finish college and about their transition from the school gates to the brave new world.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/My Standard Break From Life.

 

SergioWhen Sergio entered the University of North Carolina in 2006, there were only one or two other students there besides him who were undocumented, and he was careful to keep quiet about his status. Many of his friends and relatives had told him not to bother trying to go to college and to just get a job at Burger King or MacDonald’s, but Sergio didn’t listen to them. With the help of a full scholarship, he graduated in 2011 with a degree in English. He’s been working in the restaurant business since then. But when his Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals permit comes through, he hopes to work in education or a related profession.

GinaGeorgina Leal graduated from DePaul University with a B.A. in Anthropology and Latin American/Latino studies. She is currently completing a year of service with the Vincentian Mission Corps in St. Louis, and hopes to pursue a PhD in socio-cultural Anthropology.

 

 

jaysonJayson came to the U.S. from Guatemala with his family eight years ago. With scholarship money, he became the first in his family to go to college, graduating from the University of Richmond in 2012 with a degree in business administration. Because he’s undocumented, Jayson couldn’t get a job in his field and spent the last year painting houses. But once he gained a legal presence in the US through the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Jayson got several job offers and accepted one in hospital administration. He and his partner are expecting their first child this summer.

Latinos in College, the New and the Old

We often hear about Latinos being underrepresented in college campuses when compared to other ethnicities. A recent report, however, shows that for the first time, there are more Latino high school graduates entering college than whites. But what about finishing college? For an overview on new and old trends, María Hinojosa speaks with Richard Fry, senior research associate at the Pew Research Hispanic Center.

Photo courtesy of Flickr/always.amym.

 

Fry.photoRichard Fry is a senior economist at the Pew Research Hispanic Center. He is an expert on school and college enrollment in the United States, as well as the returns to education in the labor market, marriage market, and its connection to household economic well-being such as net worth. Before joining the Pew Research Center in 2002, he was a senior economist at the Educational Testing Service (ETS).

StoryCorps Historias’ Teachable Moments

As the school year ends, we hear two stories about teachers from StoryCorps Historias, one from a student who dropped out in Los Angeles and one from a student in Chicago who started his first business as a teenager in an unusual way.


Click here to download this week’s show.

 

 

Roger Alvarez (l) and his former teacher, Antero Garcia (r) in Los Angeles.

 

 

Noe Rueda (r) and his former teacher, Alex Fernandez (l) in Madison, WI. Noe grew up in Chicago.

 

 

All audio and photos courtesy of StoryCorps. Noe’s story was produced by Michael Garofalo. Roger’s story was produced by Brian Reed.

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