Latino USA

Posts Tagged ‘elections’

Who wins in November? Romney, Obama or Latinos? Find out Oct. 18

 

Thursday, October 18th
6-8pm | The New School
55 W. 13TH ST. | THERESA LANG CENTER

Latino voters are expected to play a pivotal role in the presidential election, just as they did in 2008. This town hall event will explore the tensions in the complex relationship that has evolved between the Latino electorate and the presidential candidates. Will economic concerns such as unemployment and housing foreclosures guide at the voting booth? Will the candidates’ immigration policies dominate? Or will large numbers of Latinos simply sit out this election? Understanding the political cross-currents buffeting Latinos today will provide valuable insight on the probable outcome of the election, as well as political and policy implications for the nation over the next four years.

A CONVERSATION WITH:
Maria Hinojosa
 President, The Futuro Media Group
Jordan Fabian Political Editor, Univision News
Chung-Wha Hong Executive Director, New York Immigration Coalition
Mark Hugo Lopez Associate Director, Pew Hispanic Center
Fernand Amandi Partner, Bendixen and Amandi Intl.

In partnership with

 

Romney-Ryan Ticket Bad for Immigrants


by Erwin de Leon

Rep. Paul Ryan, Mitt Romney’s chosen running mate, shares a hardline stance on immigration with the former Massachusetts governor. A Romney-Ryan administration would not be as friendly to immigrants as the current occupant of the White House.

On his Congressional website, the Republican vice presidential candidate promises to continue advocating for “common sense reforms to our broken [immigration] system.” His notion of reform focuses on strict border control and law enforcement, even though our borders are more secure than ever, immigration from Mexico has slowed down, and the Obama administration has deported a record number of unauthorized immigrants. He hedges on the DREAM Act, stating that he “understands the points DREAM ACT supporters have raised,” but the stark fact is that he voted against it in 2010.

OnTheIssues.org, a nonprofit and nonpartisan organization which provides information on candidates, gives a good indication where Ryan stands on immigration. In 2006, he voted in favor or building a fence along the Mexican border and on preventing tipping off Mexicans about the Minuteman Project.

We will certainly learn more in the coming days where the Wisconsin congressman stands on immigration and other issues that matter to voters. But make no mistake: Romney picked Ryan because of pressure from conservatives. The GOP ticket now solidly sits on the far right on nearly all issues. In short, Romney and Ryan in the White House would be bad news not only for immigrants, but for seniors, women, LGBTs, and middle class Americans as well.

You can follow Erwin de Leon on Twitter or read his blog.

 

Fi2W is supported by the New York Community Trust and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation with additional support from the Ralph E. Odgen Foundation and the Sirus Fund.

Noticiando

Rep. Charles Rangel’s congressional seat is up for grabs in one New York’s historically African American districts. The main challenger: Dominican-American State Senator Adriano Espaillat. But could the district’s predominantly Latino voters actually swing the election? We speak to Roberto Perez, host of The Perez Notes, a blog that focuses on New York State and city politics.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Roberto Perez is the host of a NY based political blog called “The Perez Notes.” The blog focuses on NY state and city politics. Roberto was born and raised, in the city of New York and is of Dominican descent. In addition to producing The Perez Notes blog, Roberto is also a weekly political columnist for El Diario La Prensa. You can listen to, and view some of Roberto’s work by going to www.thepereznotes.com

 

Thoughts on Mexican Elections

Writer Daniel Hernandez was already disappointed in US politics when he moved to his parents’ home country of Mexico almost five years ago. Now that he is registered to vote in Mexico for the first time he has found old problems in the political system of his new home.

Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of The Americas Program.

Daniel Hernandez is a freelance journalist based in Mexico City and a news assistant in the Los Angeles Times bureau in Mexico. He’s been a staff writer at the L.A. Times and LA Weekly. A native of San Diego, Calif., Daniel is author of the 2011 book “Down & Delirious in Mexico City.”

Yo Soy 132: The Mexican Spring

At a private university in Mexico City, students protested a talk by presidential candidate Enrique Peña Nieto on May 11, and were accused of being agitators for hire by media outlets. One hundred and thirty one of the students involved posted videos identifying themselves as genuine students and sparked a series of large protests against media influence on elections and other political irregularities. We speak to journalist Luisa Ortiz Perez about Yo Soy 132’s off-campus impact.

Click here to download this week’s show.

If you can follow audio en español, check out this segment featuring Sandino Bucio Dovali, one of the students who is part of the Yo Soy 132 movement talking about how he got involved:

 

 

Luisa Ortiz Pérez is an on-line producer and editor. She is the founder of Nova Mexico, an organization that generates digital solutions and communication strategies for social responsibility initiatives promoting social change. She has published in specialized journals in Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela and the United States on political discourses and the formation of identities for indigenous groups. As a producer she has worked for NPR, the BBC, CBC, Yahoo! Latin America and Esmas.com

Noticiando

Florida officials are purging non-citizen voters from their rolls less than six months before the presidential elections. Does this guard the ballot for eligible voters, or is it a way to keep Latinos, Blacks and Democrats from voting? For a closer look at Florida’s most recent voter measure, we talk to Myrna Perez, the Senior Counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University.

Click here to download this week’s show.

Myrna Perez is a senior counsel for the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice, a legal research and advocacy organization at New York University. She also works on a variety of voting rights related issues, including redistricting, voter registration list maintenance, and access to the ballot box. Before joining the center, Ms. Pérez was the Civil Rights Fellow at Relman & Dane, a civil rights law firm in Washington, D.C.

Noticiando

As presidential elections approach, new voter ID laws being enacted in several states could make it harder for younger, minority and low-income voters to cast their ballots. This week, Maria Hinojosa speaks to Steven Carbó, Senior Program Director in the Democracy Program at Demos, about how these new laws could affect Latino voters.

Click here to download this segment.

 

Steven Carbó is the Senior Program Director in the Democracy Program at Demos. The program he directs helps support policy makers and activists with applied research, policy analysis and organizing assistance. He has worked at community, state and federal levels in advancing civil rights, social justice, and community economic development.

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