Latino USA

Posts Tagged ‘health’

Serving The (Still) Uninsured

The Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. Obamacare, resulted in millions more people being signed up for health insurance. But some folks are still uninsured, especially the undocumented. Reporter Lisa Morehouse takes us to places in California where the struggle to care for–and insure–undocumented Californians is still going on.

 

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Lisa-Morehouse-150x150Lisa Morehouse is an award-winning independent public radio and print journalist, who’s filed for KQED’s The California Report, NPR’s Latino USA and All Things Considered, Edutopia magazine and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa.  She’s currently working on After The Gold Rush: The Future of Rural California, an audio documentary website and series. A former public school teacher, Morehouse also works with at-risk youth to produce radio diaries.

 

 

Photo by Wikimedia Commons user Patrick Pelster

Making It As Teen Parents

Teen parents face stiff odds when it comes to finishing school. Peers and school administrators alike often times see them as lost causes. But reporter Rebecca Plevin finds a rare success story about a young California couple determined to make it through school, support their daughter and stay together in the process.

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Rebecca Plevin is a Health Reporter at KPCC. Prior to working at KPCC, Rebecca spent five years covering health news in California’s Central Valley, first for the bilingual paper “Vida en el Valle,” and then for Fresno-based Valley Public Radio. She has been a lead reporter on The Reporting on Health Collaborative’s groundbreaking series of stories about Valley Fever. State officials decided to relocate thousands of inmates from state prisons in the Central Valley following Rebecca’s reporting on Valley Fever’s impact on the incarcerated.

The Neighbors In Our Guts

We all carry about 3 pounds of microbes with us, mostly in our gut. Bacterial cells outnumber our “human” cells by a factor of 10 to 1 — meaning we’re really 90 percent microbe!

Scientists now think these microbes influence our risk of many ailments, including heart disease, asthma, allergies and obesity

The also think our modern lifestyle has hurt this community of organisms. They’re searching the world for the community of microbes that existed before it was presumably ruined.

 

 

Science writer Moises-Velasquez Manoff returns to Latino USA to talk about the neighbors who live inside of us.

 

Photo by Wikimedia Commons User Marco Tolo 

 

A1MoisesVelasquezManoff_HeadshotMoises Velasquez-Manoff has written extensively, mostly on science and environment, for The Christian Science Monitor. His work has also appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Chicago Tribune, and the Indianapolis Star, among other publications. He holds a master of arts, with a concentration in science writing, from the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism.

 

THE LANGUAGES OF NATIVIDAD

Many of the new farmworkers in California’s Salinas Valley are indigenous. They speak dozens of languages and often, no Spanish at all. One hospital in the Salinas Valley is figuring out how to provide services in languages like Mixteca, Zapoteca and Triqui. Reporter Lisa Morehouse has this story.


Click here to download this week’s show. 

Image: Dr. Peter Chandler, Victor Sosa, Petra Leon, and Angelica Isidro go from English, to Spanish, to Mixteco. Leon, a Mixteco speaker, plans to give birth at Natividad in a couple of months. Photo courtesy of Lisa Morehouse.

 

Lisa-Morehouse

Lisa Morehouse is a public radio and print journalist, who has filed for National Public Radio, American Public Media, KQED Public Radio, Edutopia, and McSweeney’s. Her reporting has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms to the homes of Lao refugees in rural Iowa. For the last year she’s reported and produced a public radio series New Harvest: The Future of Small Town California KQED’s The California Report. KALW is currently airing pieces she created while teaching radio production to incarcerated youth.

The Genetics of Breast Cancer

Two genes, known as BRCA1 and BRCA2, can increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer as much as 80%. Researchers say the genes have been found in one in four Latina cancer patients under 40 years old in the U.S. Nova Safo reports on some new genetic research into breast cancer and Latinas that has links with Europe.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Nova Safo.

Nova Safo is a Los Angeles-based reporter who covers a wide variety of topics ranging from the Hollywood entertainment industry, to visual arts, culture, politics, policy, health, science, the future of energy, economics, and the occasional massive wildfire.
His reporting has been heard on NPR’s various newsmagazines and other public radio programs, and published online by Yahoo! News and others. He is the recipient of Hearst journalism awards for radio reporting, as well as an NLGJA/RTNDA award for excellence in online journalism.

Surviving Torture: the Super Marios Story

The Kovler Center in Chicago was designed to help victims of torture overcome their turbulent experiences. As part of our year-long series about Latinos in health, reporter Dan Weissman brings us the story of one of the people who received treatment there and the doctor who helped him.


Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of Hektoen International.

Dan Weissmann is a Chicago-based radio producer and multimedia reporter. His work has appeared regularly on WBEZ (Chicago Public Media, 91.5 FM) and can be found at www.danweissmann.com.

Relief from the Heat: The Snowy Slopes of Colorado

Reporter Whitney Eulich follows 13-year old Emily Garcia on the ski slopes of Snowmass, Colorado. Emily has autism as well as frequent epileptic seizures. She’s gained independence and self-confidence through learning to ski.

 

RadioNature is a year-long series that looks at how people of color connect with nature. Funding comes from the REI Foundation.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Whitney Eulich is a radio and print journalist based in Boston. Her work focuses on human rights, conflict resolution and Latin America. In 2011, Whitney received a Masters in International Affairs from Columbia University.

 

 

 

 

Print

Noticiando: What’s Up With Chagas?

Most people who have died from chagas disease don’t even know that they have it. It’s a disease caused by a parasite that’s found in the feces of an insect known as the “kissing bug.” According to the CDC, the number of people who have chagas is comparable to the number of people in the US who live with multiple sclerosis. Dr. Sheba Meymandi, the director of the Centre of Excellence for Chagas Disease at Olive View/UCLA medical center, talks to Maria Hinojosa about chagas disease.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Dr. Sheba Meymandi graduated from George Washington University and is currently a director for the Centre of Excellence for Chagas Disease at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, California. Under the direction of Drs. Meymandi and Traina, Olive View-UCLA Medical Center has the only Center of Excellence for Chagas Disease designated in the U.S. The Center of Excellence for Chagas Disease partners with Faith Community Nurses in the San Fernando Valley and provide free screening for Chagas disease at multiple locations in the San Fernando Valley area

THE HEALTH PROMOTERS

In Brownsville, Texas, picking up the Latin American practice of using “promotoras” lets neighbors teach neighbors about the most common health issues. Part of our year-long series on “health heroes.”


Click here to download this week’s show.


María Emilia Martin is a pioneering public radio journalist with more than two dozen awards for her work covering Latino issues and Latin America. She started her career at the first community public radio station owned and operated by Latinos in the U.S. Martin has developed ground-breaking programs and series for public radio, including NPR’s Latino USA, and Despues de las Guerras: Central America After the Wars. A recipient of Fulbright and Knight Fellowships, she has extensive experience in journalism and radio training, in the U.S., Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia and other countries. Sports Business Journal, among other publications.

Novela approaches to diabetes

Treason is at the heart of the telenovela Retos para una vida saludable. But instead of a swarthy Romeo, the threat is sweet, salty and fatty foods. University of Massachusetts Medical School Associate Professor Milagros Rosal, PhD, and her colleagues developed the soap as part of the Lawrence Latino Diabetes Prevention project, a $2.6 million, federally funded intervention to help Latinos in Lawrence, Massachusetts prevent and manage diabetes.

This story is produced by Amy Mayer and mixed by Jones Audio Productions. It’s part of a year-long series examining health issues facing Latinos. Latino USA’s year-long look at Latinos and Health is made possible by funding from Pfizer Helpful Answers®, a family of patient assistance programs for the uninsured and underinsured who need help getting Pfizer medicines.


Click here to download this week’s show.


 

Amy Mayer spent a year-and-a-half in Buenos Aires after college, before returning to the United States. She has reported on a variety of subjects literally from the far north (Alaska) to the far south (Australia and Argentina). She has been a reporter, producer, and host at NPR member stations and has produced freelance stories for a variety of programs and networks. In 2011, she produced the hour-long documentary Peace Corps Voices. Her print work has appeared in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Real Simple and many other publications.

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