Latino USA

Posts Tagged ‘immigration reform’

Immigration Reform Happened!

Do you ever have dreams about work? Maria Hinojosa had a dream that immigration reform passed the House of Representatives. There were celebratory marches all over the country. People were jumping up and down, crying with their loved ones. The economy was booming and immigrants no longer lived in fear. But then she woke up.

 

Matthew Kolken

Matthew Kolken is managing partner of Kolken & Kolken a full service immigration law firm located in Buffalo, New York.  He is also a national immigration reform advocate listed as one of the top-ten most influential individuals on Twitter in the field of immigration law. Follow him @mkolken

 

 

 

 

FYR_LindaChavez_t700Linda Chavez is president of the Center for Equal Opportunity, based in Washington, D.C., and a FOX News Channel contributor.

 

 

 

 

 

Juan EscalanteJuan Escalante is a Public Administration and Policy student at Florida State University. He came to the US with his family from Venezuela in 2000, but was left in immigration limbo. Escalante became an advocate for immigrants rights and his digital advocacy has been profiled by several media outlets. Escalante is currently a  beneficiary of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA). His parents remain undocumented.

 

 

Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

 

“News or Noise?” The Media’s Choice

For this week’s “News or Noise?” we look at media coverage on labor provisions in the Senate immigration reform bill. Why so much media buzz around visas for high tech workers in comparison to the coverage on the farmworker deal? María Hinojosa speaks with Ted Hesson, immigration editor at Fusion.

Photo courtesy of FWD.us.

 

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Hesson-headshotTed Hesson is the immigration editor for Fusion, a joint venture of ABC News and Univision. Before joining the team in 2012, he served as online editor for Long Island Wins, a non-profit organization focusing on local and national immigration issues. Ted has written for a variety of magazines, newspapers, and online publications, including The Journal News, Time Out New York, and the Philadelphia City Paper. He earned his master’s degree at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and his bachelor’s degree at Boston College. He resides in Washington, D.C.

Where is Mexico on U.S Immigration Reform?

President Obama’s visit to Mexico came with immigration reform at the center stage in Washington. And with Mexican nationals making up more than half of all undocumented immigrants living in the U.S, where is Mexico in the discussion? María Hinojosa speaks with former Mexican Ambassador Arturo Sarukhan.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of flickr.

PhotoASArturo Sarukhan served as Mexico Ambassador to the United States from 2007 to 2013. He is currently the Chairman of Global Solutions, a Podesta Company, and a global strategic consulting and risk assessment firm. He served for 20 years in the Mexican Foreign Service, as Chief of Policy Planning at the Foreign Ministry, and he was appointed Mexican Consul-General to New York City. In 2006, he joined the Presidential Campaign of Felipe Calderón as Foreign Policy Advisor and International Spokesperson and was tapped to coordinate his foreign policy Transition Team.

The Enforcement Taboo

From rallies in the Capitol, to acts of protest near the Texas/Mexico border, to a federal court room in New York, immigration activists give a final push to ensure that Congress delivers the long awaited bill reforming immigration policy and enforcement. María Hinojosa speaks to Juan Cartagena, president and general counsel of Latino Justice PRLDEF based in New York City.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of the Wilson Center’s Mexican Institute.

juanJuan Cartagena is the president and general counsel for LatinoJustice PRLDEF. He is a constitutional and civil rights attorney with experience in employment rights, language rights, voting rights, public education financing, environmental law, housing and access to public hospitals.

IMMIGRATION TUMBLEWEEDS

Congress is headed for Easter recess. How close are we to seeing immigration reform legislation, and how are national and grassroots immigrant advocacy groups mobilizing to shape new policy? María Hinojosa speaks to Pilar Marrero, senior political writer at La Opinion, for an update.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of Flickr (Creative Commons)

PilarMarrero1Pilar Marrero is a journalist who for 25 years has extensively covered the areas of city government, immigration and state and national politics. She works for La Opinión as a senior reporter and it’s a regular commentator for radio and television in both spanish and english media. She´s the author of “El Despertar del Sueño Americano” published by Penguing Books and now on sale. The english version of the book, Killing the American Dream, comes out October 2 published by Pallgrave McMillan. Marrero lives in Los Angeles.

IMMIGRATION REFORM, SERVED TWO WAYS

Two proposals for comprehensive immigration reform were released this week, from a bipartisan Senate committee and from President Obama. As we launch into political negotiations for more detailed plans, we ask: is this a breakthrough, or are we headed to another impasse as in previous years? We speak to New York Times reporter Julia Preston about the developing plans.


Click here to download this week’s show. [Image courtesy of Fox News.]

Julia Preston was a member of The New York Times staff that won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for reporting on international affairs for its series that profiled the corrosive effects of drug corruption in Mexico. Ms. Preston came to The Times in July 1995 after working at the Washington Post for nine years as a foreign correspondent. She is a 1997 recipient of the Maria Moors Cabot Prize for distinguished coverage of Latin America and a 1994 winner of the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Humanitarian Journalism.

Born in Lake Forest, Ill., on May 29, 1951, Ms. Preston received a B.A. degree in Latin American Studies from Yale University in 1976. She speaks fluent Spanish and Portuguese. She has one daughter.

CINDY’S STORY

What does being in the “back of the line” mean for today’s undocumented immigrants? We speak to DREAMer Cindy about her opinion on both the Senate and the President’s proposal and her feelings on how effective either proposal would be.

Click here to download this week’s show. [Photo courtesy of Flickr.]

 

 

NOTICIANDO: DEADLY SOUTH TEXAS

With border enforcement front and center in both immigration reform proposals, security and migration issues are stepping into the limelight. The Washington Office on Latin America found that South Texas was different from other border regions. Senior Associate for Regional Security at WOLA Adam Isacson explains the findings—and reveals the sometimes deadly truths.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Adam Isacson is a key member of WOLA’s Regional Security Policy team. He is a leading expert on defense, civil-military relations, and U.S. security assistance to the Americas. He collaborates on Just the Facts—a constantly updated source of information and analysis of the United States’ often troubled relationship with Latin America’s militaries. He helped found Just the Facts in the early 1990s.

Mr. Isacson has co-authored dozens of publications, including “Ready, Aim, Foreign Policy” and “Waiting for Change,” which examine the increasing role of the military in U.S. foreign policy. He has testified before Congress on international drug policy, Colombia’s conflict, U.S. military aid programs and human rights, and has organized several congressional delegations to the region.

A TALE OF TWO GARZAS

In the first of two reports from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, reporter Maria Martin examines how the controversy over immigration reform is viewed in this predominately Latino part of the country.  Here she talks to two men, both named Garza.  One is a law enforcement officer; the other is a local politician and community organizer.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of flickr (creative commons).

María Emilia Martin is a pioneering public radio journalist with more than two dozen awards for her work covering Latino issues and Latin America. She started her career at the first community public radio station owned and operated by Latinos in the U.S. Martin has developed ground-breaking programs and series for public radio, including NPR’s Latino USA, and Despues de las Guerras: Central America After the Wars. A recipient of Fulbright and Knight Fellowships, she has extensive experience in journalism and radio training, in the U.S., Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia and other countries. Sports Business Journal, among other publications.

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