Love in the Time of Xenophobia

Since the presidential campaign started last year there has been plenty of anti-immigrant and anti-Latino rhetoric, especially coming from Republican candidates Donald Trump and Ted Cruz.

Race in general is playing a role in the 2016 election across the country and 23-year-old Bobbi Contreras knows it.

“Things are different when you’re in a biracial relationship,” she said.

Contreras lives in Des Moines, Iowa, a place where she often sees bumper stickers supporting Trump and “Don’t Tread on Me” t-shirts. She took her husband Luis’ last name after they got married. She’s white and says that because she’s married to a Mexican immigrant, her family has been on the receiving end of racist comments.

“I wish we didn’t have to face these things, I wish I could say that I think it won’t be like this for my children. But as the fear of immigrants continues to rise and people like Trump are allowed to say terrible things about immigrants and minorities in general, I’m not sure that my kids will have it easier when they grow up,” Contreras said.

Contreras wrote a book called “Love Has No Papers” and brings us this essay:

Featured image via Bobbi Contreras

POSTVILLE FIVE YEARS LATER

Five years ago, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents closed in on a kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa and carried out the largest immigration raid in U.S history. Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with filmmaker Luis Argueta, director of “Abused: the Postville Raid,” a documentary about the raid’s impact on immigrant families and on the town.

[audio:http://latinousa.org/audio/1319seg01.mp3]
Click here to download this week’s show. Image: Abused Documentary Facebook.

Luis Argueta (photo by Bea Gallardo)Luis Argueta is a film director and producer whose work spans features, documentaries, shorts and episodic TV. He has also worked as commercial director, lecturer and teacher in the United States, Europe and throughout the Americas.  Born and raised in Guatemala, Argueta is a US Citizen and has been a resident of New York since 1977. His film The Silence of Neto is the only Guatemalan film ever to have been submitted to the Academy Awards competition and he is the only Guatemalan director to have received a CLIO. In April 2009, the British newspaper The Guardian, listed Mr. Argueta as one of Guatemala’s National Living Icons, alongside Nobel Laureate Rigoberta Menchu and Singer/Songwriter Ricardo Arjona.