Latino USA

Posts Tagged ‘Latinos’

My Tia’s Battle With Mental Disorder

Blas Díaz is a social worker at a nursing home for the mentally ill in Chicago. Even though he spends his days helping people battle mental disorders, he was shocked to discover his own aunt had been battling bipolar disorder her entire life. Blas sat down with his tía and talked about the struggle to find the right medicines, the ever-present temptation of suicide, and the family support that’s helped her come this far. She has chosen to remain anonymous for this piece. Blas’ story comes to us by way of the Vocalo Storytellers Workshop from Chicago Public Media.

Deena and Jay: Living with Depression

Ever since she was a young girl, Deena realized that something wasn’t right – that she never felt happy or comfortable in her own skin. She suffered from depression. But in the South Texas, Mexican-American family she grew up with, there was a stigma around mental illness that prevented her and her family from seeking treatment.

In college, Deena met Jay. They got married, had kids. After each birth, Deena suffered really bad post-partum depression. After she miscarried her third child, things fell apart. Deena’s depression was getting worse. On top of it, her marriage to Jay began to unravel. She decided to try getting on medication.

The doctor prescribed her Lamitrogine (also known as Lamictal), an epilepsy drug with a secondary use of treating manic-depressives. A week later, she developed flu-like symptoms, then irritation in her eyes and throat. She didn’t realize it at first, but these symptoms were the beginnings of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, a life-threatening condition that often happens as the result of an immune reaction to medication.

With Stevens-Johnson, cell death causes the outer layer of the skin to separate from the body and die, including the the epidermis inside your body and internal organs. Deena has to be airlifted to a military hospital, where doctors saved her life by oxygenating her blood outside of her body for almost a month while she was in a medical coma.

Deena survived. But with various medical complications ranging from damaged eyes to a scarred throat, life is full of new challenges that impact her mental health. While she was under, her husband Jay had to make the decision to put her on the machines that saved her life. Deena says that sometimes she wished he had let her die.

Now they have to figure out how to pick up the pieces of their life and marriage, and raise their kids. Nothing about it is easy.

 

Sabiduria: How I Stopped Drinking

In order to deal with stress, many people turn to alcohol. But one Latina tells us how she, with the help of Alcoholics Anonymous, stopped drinking. Our guest has chosen to remain anonymous.

 

If you need help with alcohol addiction, you can visit the following websites:

 

Photo by John Kraus via Flickr

Health Care Reform Leaves Undocumented Uninsured

The Affordable Care Act does not actually cover everyone. Even in California, the state that leads in enrollment, an estimated one million people cannot access health care – undocumented immigrants. Many are undocumented immigrants. We visit Sonoma County’s Graton Day Labor Center, an advocacy and training group that tries to address this community’s needs.

Photo by Lisa Morehouse

 

 

The World Cup and Latinos: Vamos USA!

More and more Americans started tuning in to Team USA’s matches in this year’s World Cup in Brazil. The US’s heart stopping match against Portugal became the most watched soccer event in US TV history. It’s still unclear if the soccer hype will outlast the tournament — especially now that the US National Team is out. But one thing is certain: soccer is especially popular among Latinos in the United States. And as reported by our former producer Brenda Salinas, Latinos have divided allegiances when it comes to the World Cup. We continue our coverage of the World Cup by taking to the streets of Queens, in New York City, at one of the most demographically diverse places in the nation, to ask Latinos of different national origins who they’re rooting for this World Cup.

We found strong rooting for the countries of origin for immigrants, first and second generation Latinos. And we also found support and excitement for the US National team. And when it comes down to it, even if Mexico, Colombia, Argentina or Costa Rica were to face off against the U.S., Latinos don’t feel like picking a side. Some of them even enjoy the benefits of rooting for two national teams.

 

Our interns Roxane L. Scott and Sarah Barrett contributed reporting for this piece. 

Cover photo by Getty Images.  

Tackling the GOP’s Latino Problem

The Republican Party continues to struggle to recover the level of Latino support it enjoyed during the George W. Bush era. The $64 million question: can the Republicans do it, and how? María Hinojosa speaks with Pablo Pantoja, former Republican National Committee Hispanic outreach director in Florida, and George Antuna, co-founder of the Hispanic Republicans of Texas.

Photo courtesy of…

 

pabloPablo Pantoja has worked and volunteered in several roles with the Republican Party at the local, state, and national levels. Recently, he repudiated the culture of intolerance in the Republican Party through a public letter to his friends and took a stand by switching to the Democratic Party. Pantoja is a veteran of the Army National Guard and holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Spanish and a Master’s Degree in Political Science, Applied American Politics and Policy from Florida State University.

Screen Shot 2013-06-21 at 1.21.40 PMGeorge Antuna Jr. is the co-founder of the Hispanic Republicans of Texas. He is a former candidate for the Texas House of Representatives and worked for U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison as Regional Director for San Antonio, South Central Texas and El Paso. Before entering public service, he was the Director of Protocol for then Texas Secretary of State, Henry Cuellar, and Policy Analyst of Workforce Development, Economic Development and International Relations for then Lt. Governor Rick Perry. Mr. Antuna was elected to the council of the City of Schertz in May, 2011. He currently works in the financial services industry.

 

Bienvenidos a Woodburn

The increase in Latino populations throughout many U.S. communities in the past two decades may be old news. But in states like Oregon, the change is very recent and very dramatic. Producer Dmae Roberts brings us a portrait of a town transformed in the Beaver state. Woodburn is now 60% Latino, the highest proportion in the state.

Image of the Quinteros at their Woodburn “taquería,” courtesy of Dmae Roberts.


DmaeDmae Roberts is a two-time Peabody award-winning radio artist and writer based in Portland, Oregon who has written and produced more than 500 audio art pieces and documentaries for NPR and PRI. She is a USA Rockefeller Fellow and received the Dr. Suzanne Award for Civil Rights and Social Justice from the Asian American Journalists Association for her Peabody-winning eight-hour Crossing East Asian American history series that ran on 230 stations. Her essay “Finding The Poetry” was published in John Biewen’s essay book Reality Radio (UNC Press).

DIA DE LOS TRADEMARKS, “NEWS OR NOISE?”

When Disney tried to trademark “Dia de los Muertos” for their new movie merchandise inspired by the Mexican holiday, Latinos went online and turned things back around. For this week’s “News or Noise?” Latino USA guest host Luis Antonio Perez speaks with Kety Esquivel, digital media strategist and Vice President for Fenton, about how Latinos online retaliated against the entertainment giant.

Illustration by Lalo Alcaraz; Image courtesy of Pocho.Com, where you can see the whole illustration. 

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KetyKety Esquivel leads the digital practice for Fenton’s Western region with nearly 20 years of experience in the private and public sectors. Her commentaries has been featured in stories on the Wall St. Journal, HITN, PBS, CNN, Televisa and Univision. She also served as the New Media Manager for the National Council of La Raza and the interim CEO for Latinos in Social Media.

Lalo_hs-150x150Lalo Alcaraz is the creator of the first nationally-syndicated, politically-themed Latino daily comic strip, “La Cucaracha,” seen in scores of newspapers including the Los Angeles Times. He is also co-host of KPFK Radio’s popular satirical talk show, “The Pocho Hour of Power,” and co-founded the political satire comedy group Chicano Secret Service. His work has appeared in major publications around the world and he has won numerous awards and honors. Alcaraz received his Bachelor’s degree from San Diego State University, and earned his master’s degree in architecture from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a faculty member at Otis College of Art & Design in Los Angeles. Alcaraz was born in San Diego and grew up on the border. He is married to a hard-working public school teacher and they have three extremely artistic children.

LeafferMarshall Leaffer is a copyright-law expert and professor at Indiana University’s Maurer School of Law.

 

NOTICIANDO: BLOGGEANDO

How has the Latino blogosphere changed as more people tweet and use tumblr and as big companies use new media to reach out to Latinos? Host Maria Hinojosa speaks to Maegan Ortiz, the publisher of Vivir Latino, about the changes for Latinos in new media.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Maegan Ortiz is a Los Angeles based Nuyorican mami media maker. She has written for the American Prospect, the Progressive, Univision, El Diario la Prensa, and Latina on Latino politics, media, and culture. She is the Publisher of VivirLatino and can be found on twitter @mamitamala.

NOTICIANDO: HUNGER IN AMERICA

Latinos who live in the United States are twice as likely to go hungry than the rest of Americans, according to a yearly survey by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Alfredo Estrada, editor of Latino Magazine, tells us about “No Mas Hambre,” an initiative to raise awareness and encourage people to act.


Click here to download this week’s show.
Register for the “No Mas Hambre” Summit to take place Washington, DC on December 7, 2012

Alfredo J. Estrada is the editor of Latino Magazine, a publication that focuses on politics and culture. Estrada is a nationally recognized expert on Hispanic media who has served on the boards of KRLU-TV, the Harvard Hispanic Policy Journal, and other organizations. He also founded HISPANIC, an award-winning magazine for U.S. Hispanics.

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