Latino USA

Posts Tagged ‘media’

When Statistics Don’t Tell The Whole Story

Who suffers when media misinterprets statistics? Well…everyone. Ethnifacts’ Guy Garcia and Latino USA’s senior producer, A.C. Valdez,  break it down for you. Learn why it matters that numbers tell the whole truth, and how sins of omission can make for bad journalism.

 

 

guygarcia 2Guy Garcia is a former Time magazine staff writer and contributor to the New York Times, and the author of The New Mainstream: How the Multicultural Consumer is Transforming American Business and other books.

 

 

 

 

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ACValdezA.C. Valdez is Latino USA’s Senior Producer. A.C. Valdez comes to Latino USA by way of public radio shows like America Abroad, The Diane Rehm Show, WAMU-FM’s The Kojo Nnamdi Show, and Tell Me More. He’s worked with reporters from around the world, coordinated performances with groups like The Noisettes, and done in-depth work on the U.S. military’s counterinsurgency strategy in Iraq and Afghanistan. A native of Washington, D.C., A.C. Is a graduate of Emerson College.

 

 

 

Photo by Flickr user ansik

Buzzfeed’s Big Idea

The media landscape is one still dominated by white men, but perhaps BuzzFeed is a glimpse into a more colorful future? The editor of the newly launhced BuzzFeed Ideas, Ayesha Siddiqi, talks with host Maria Hinojosa about the need for women of color to own their own narratives, squaring off with ABC Family and why Kanye West is a role model.

 

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Ayesha Siddiqi is the editor of Buzzfeed Ideas.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia user Jonathan McIntosh

Shut Up And Listen: Lessons From #CancelColbert

On Thursday, March 27, Comedy Central’s The Colbert Report tweeted something it shouldn’t have — the punchline to a joke from the night before. That tweet sparked the trending #CancelColbert hashtag, and a debate that quickly erupted into an explosive argument about race, satire, and who is allowed to be offended by what. Latino USA producers Michael Simon Johnson and Daisy Rosario, along with sportswriter Tomas Ríos, sat down to talk about what happened, how it happened, and what, if anything, can be learned from the experience.

TomasRiosTomas Ríos is a paid-lance writer who has contributed to Deadspin, Sports on Earth, Slate, Pacific Standard and The Classical. He tweets @TheTomasRios

 

 

 

 

 

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Micheal_JohnsonMichael Simon Johnson is a Pittsburgh native who spent most of his childhood making music and groaning when his parents put on NPR in the car. So naturally he graduated from Emerson College with a degree in Sound Design, moved to New York and made his way into public radio. As an engineer, he has worked for Afropop Worldwide, WNYC’s Radio Rookies, and Jazz at Lincoln Center. He commits much of his time to working on radio and multimedia projects but can often be found playing the bass, rock climbing, and traveling.

 

 

 

Daisy-Rosario-headshot-150x150Daisy Rosario is a comedian, writer and producer of things from radio stories to live events. Recently graduated from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, she also works with The Moth and the Upright CitizensBrigade Theatre. Daisy has interned at Radiolab, taken a play she directed to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and is an obsessive baseball fan. Her story “Child of Trouble,” was featured on the Peabody award-winning Moth Radio Hour. She holds a BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts.

 

 

 

Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images

 

 

Seeing Ourselves Reflected In Stock Photos

When you search Google for “Working Mom,” this is what you might see:

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Working Moms
A woman in a bad pantsuit carrying a crying toddler in a kitchen while talking on a brick-sized cell phone. A woman with photoshopped arms to show how busy she is. A woman struggling to hold a baby, a briefcase, groceries — why are there rollers in her hair? Now do a search for “Woman Executive.”

 

 

WomanBoss

 

Gross. It’s a problem that Sheryl Sandberg wants to fix. She’s partnering with Getty Images, the largest provider of these photos, to create a collection of photos that depict women in more empowering ways.

 

 

 

 

 

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They show diversity: women of color, women in same-sex relationships, varying ages and professions, men in caretaking roles. But are they really enough to change perceptions of women? XOJane.com’s Veronica Marché – Miller says it’s definitely a good start. “I think seeing these women in these authentic situations and oftentimes just looking content is a step in the right direction,” she says.

 

 

Veronica Marché Miller B3_Shoes_Headshot_NoCreditis an illustrator and writer based in Philadelphia, PA. She runs a freelance illustration business serving women of color and organizations that serve them, and past clients include The Red Pump Project, Sports and the City and Contradiction Dance. Veronica also writes about fashion for xoJane.com, focusing on the fashion industry’s relationship with women of color.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fusion’s Alicia Menendez Learns The Ropes

When you launch a new project, the learning curve is steep.

Alicia Menendez knows this first hand.

3 months ago, she had her first night as Fusion’s evening news anchor.

 

 

Fusion is an news, pop culture and satire TV network aimed at English-speaking millennials, including those of a Hispanic background.

Alicia Menendez Tonight employs a sassy, irreverent tone to cover the news stories not traditionally covered in evening broadcasts.

“My generation is really redefining what we mean by news,” says Menendez, “We mean news, the headlines but also news in the context of conversations that we’re having every day.”

 She talks to Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa about how Fusion is trying to reach the millennial audience and about the lessons she’s learned 90 days into her tenure.

 

 

Alicia Menendez_1844 By Gio Alma 2013 Ready Alicia Menendez is Fusion’s evening news anchor.

The Boston Marathon Bombing, “News or Noise?”

For this week’s “News or Noise?” –where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation— we discuss the media’s coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing. To separate the news from the noise, María Hinojosa speaks with Dan Kennedy, journalism professor at Northeastern University in Boston.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of flickr (abustaca).

Click here to take the quiz!

Having trouble taking the quiz on your mobile device? Go to the quiz directly here.

News or Noise logo final option 2-01“News or Noise?” is a dynamic multiplatform radio project produced by Latino USA to encourage listeners to think critically about the news. Supported by Chicago’s Robert R. McCormick Foundation as part of its “Why News Matters” initiative, this year-long series of radio reports will explore top stories in the news cycle around which there is extensive commentary, misinformation, confusion or misunderstanding. The companion “News or Noise?” online quiz, (schedule here), will ask listeners to put their critical reasoning skills to the test as they discern fact from fabrication about each news topic.

Kennedy headshotDan Kennedy teaches journalism at Northeastern University in Boston. He is a regular panelist on “Beat the Press,” a weekly media roundtable on WGBH-TV. He is also a regular contributor on media and politics for the Huffington Post, and has written for the Guardian, Nieman Reports, the Nieman Journalism Lab, Slate, the Boston Globe, and CommonWealth Magazine. In 2001, he received the National Press Club’s Arthur Rowse Award for Press Criticism. He is the author of “Little People: Learning to See the World Through My Daughter’s Eyes”. His blog, Media Nation, tracks issues related to journalism, politics and culture.

“News or Noise?”: Illegal Immigrant

The Associated Press announced it will stop using the term “illegal immigrant.” For our “News or Noise?” segment –where we take a look at media matters that may involve misunderstanding or misinformation— Latino USA host María Hinojosa talks to the Poynter Institute’s Kenny Irby about why this matters.


Click here to download this week’s show.  Image courtesy of Cuentame.

Check out the post on the AP blog, “Illegal immigrant no more.”

Click here to take the quiz!

Having trouble taking the quiz on your mobile device? Go to the quiz directly here.

News or Noise logo final option 2-01“News or Noise?” is a dynamic multiplatform radio project produced by Latino USA to encourage listeners to think critically about the news. Supported by Chicago’s Robert R. McCormick Foundation as part of its “Why News Matters” initiative, this year-long series of radio reports will explore top stories in the news cycle around which there is extensive commentary, misinformation, confusion or misunderstanding. The companion “News or Noise?” online quiz, (schedule here), will ask listeners to put their critical reasoning skills to the test as they discern fact from fabrication about each news topic.

Kenny Irby.photoKenny Irby is Poynter’s senior faculty and director of community relations. He’s also the director of the Write Field initiative, a dynamic new academic enrichment and mentoring program for middle school minority male youth. Irby founded Poynter’s photojournalism program in 1995.

NOTICIANDO: BLOGGEANDO

How has the Latino blogosphere changed as more people tweet and use tumblr and as big companies use new media to reach out to Latinos? Host Maria Hinojosa speaks to Maegan Ortiz, the publisher of Vivir Latino, about the changes for Latinos in new media.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Maegan Ortiz is a Los Angeles based Nuyorican mami media maker. She has written for the American Prospect, the Progressive, Univision, El Diario la Prensa, and Latina on Latino politics, media, and culture. She is the Publisher of VivirLatino and can be found on twitter @mamitamala.

NOTICIANDO: LATINO MEDIA MARKETS

The growth in the Latino population has media power houses fighting for a share of the highly coveted Latino market. To better understand how US media companies compete to capture Latino audiences, we revisit our conversation with Arlene Davila, a professor of Anthropology, Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Arlene Davila is a professor of Anthropology, Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. She is the author of Sponsored Identities: Cultural Politics in Puerto Rico and Latinos Inc: Marketing and the Making of a People, Barrio Dreams: Puerto Ricans, Latinos and the Neoliberal City. Her book, Latino Spin: Public Image and the Whitewashing of Race recently received the Latin American Studies Association prize for the best book in Latino studies.

Minor Crossers

Every year, thousands of unaccompanied minors cross the U.S/Mexico border to be reunited with family.  But this spring, the Department of Health and Human Services reported that the number of minors arriving alone had nearly doubled. We speak to Pulitzer Prize winning author and journalist Sonia Nazario about who these minors are and why the numbers have shot up.

Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of the Los Angeles Times.


Sonia Nazario is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and author of Enrique’s Journey, a national bestseller that has been adopted by more than 50 universities across the country. She has spent more than 20 years reporting and writing about social issues, hunger, drug addiction, and immigration, most recently as a projects reporter for the Los Angeles Times.

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