Latino USA

Posts Tagged ‘mexico’

Las Luchadoras

Lucha Libre, Mexico’s national past-time of performance wrestling, is a macho sport where contestants wear super hero costumes and try to crush each other in the ring. They’re mostly thought of as men, but that’s starting to change. As Jasmine Garsd reports, women luchadoras are earning their place alongside men in this strange and complex Mexican tradition.

 

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Jasmine Garsd was born in Argentina and hosts NPR’s Alt.Latino podcast. As a journalist she’s worked on the NPR programs Morning Edition, Talk of the Nation and Tell Me More. She has covered a wide variety of topics for radio including immigration issues.

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by Flickr user Lee South

Spitting in Spanglish

From the Mecca of Mexican hip-hop, 27-year-old rapper Carla Reyna, aka Niña Dioz, talks about hip-hop, race, and her new album, “Indestructible.”
Photo Courtesy of Niña Dioz Facebook.

Screen Shot 2013-05-31 at 1.34.13 PMCarla Reyna, better known by her MC name Niña Dioz, emerged from the underground hip-hop scene in Monterrey, Mexico. After years of making a name for herself in Mexico and internationally on the hip-hop festival circuit, she has finally released her first full-length album, “Indestructible,” a collection of Spanglish rhymes and high-energy beats.

FOR BULLETS, IT’S OPEN BORDERS

Why are U.S Border Patrol agents shooting into Mexico and killing innocent civilians? Latino USA host María Hinojosa speaks with John Carlos Frey, author of investigative report, “Over the Line,” that looks into the increase in fatal shootings of Mexican nationals, by border patrol agents.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of John Carlos Frey.

john-carlos-frey-cropped_150John Carlos Frey is a freelance investigative reporter and documentary filmmaker based in Los Angeles. His investigative work has been featured on the 60 Minutes episode, “The All American Canal;” a three-part series for PBS entitled “Crossing the Line;” and several episodes of Dan Rather Reports, “Angel of the Desert,” and “Operation Streamline.” In 2011 Frey documented the journey of Mexican migrants across the US-Mexico border and walked for days in the Arizona desert risking his own life for the documentary Life and Death on the Border”. John Carlos Frey has also written articles for the Los Angeles Times, the Huffington Post, Salon, Need to Know online, the Washington Monthly, and El Diario (in Spanish). Frey’s documentary films include The Invisible Mexicans of Deer Canyon (2007), The Invisible Chapel (2008), and The 800 Mile Wall (2009). He is the 2012 recipient of the Scripps Howard Award and the Sigma Delta Chi award for his Investigative Fund/PBS reporting on the excessive use of force by the US Border Patrol.

Where is Mexico on U.S Immigration Reform?

President Obama’s visit to Mexico came with immigration reform at the center stage in Washington. And with Mexican nationals making up more than half of all undocumented immigrants living in the U.S, where is Mexico in the discussion? María Hinojosa speaks with former Mexican Ambassador Arturo Sarukhan.


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of flickr.

PhotoASArturo Sarukhan served as Mexico Ambassador to the United States from 2007 to 2013. He is currently the Chairman of Global Solutions, a Podesta Company, and a global strategic consulting and risk assessment firm. He served for 20 years in the Mexican Foreign Service, as Chief of Policy Planning at the Foreign Ministry, and he was appointed Mexican Consul-General to New York City. In 2006, he joined the Presidential Campaign of Felipe Calderón as Foreign Policy Advisor and International Spokesperson and was tapped to coordinate his foreign policy Transition Team.

Lost Women

Maria Hinojosa examines a pattern of violence and human rights abuses in Mexico. In the seven years since the Mexican government launched its war against the drug cartels, more than 60,000 people have been killed and an estimated 25,000 have disappeared.  Much of the violence comes from police and government forces as well as the cartels — and women are often targets.  Does Mexico’s new President, Enrique Peña Nieto have the will to curb the excesses?


Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of oneinthreewomen.com.
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Mem.Photo_-copyMaría Emilia Martin is a pioneering public radio journalist with over two dozen awards for her work covering Latino issues and Latin America. She started her career at the first community public radio station owned and operated by Latinos in the U.S. She has developed ground-breaking programs and series for public radio, including NPR’s Latino USA, and Despues de las Guerras: Central America After the Wars. A recipient of Fulbright and Knight Fellowships, she has extensive experience in journalism and radio training, in the U.S., Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia and other countries.

THREE KINGS DEMOCRACY

Host Maria Hinojosa talks about her memories of how Los Reyes Magos — the Three Wise Men — are celebrated in Mexico and in New York City’s East Harlem, where she is marching as a Queen in this year’s Three Kings’ Parade down Fifth Avenue.


Click here to download this week’s show.

DO THEY KNOW IT’S MEX-MAS?

For almost 25 years, Robert Lopez has been putting on an Elvis suit and becoming El Vez, the Mexican Elvis. Latino USA producer Nadia Reiman brings us a profile of the performer and takes us through his Merry Mex-Mas Christmas show.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Nadia Reiman has been a radio producer since 2005. Before joining the Latino USA team, Nadia produced for StoryCorps for almost five years. Her work there on 9/11 stories earned her a Peabody Award. She has also mixed audio for animations, one which won a DuPont award, hosted podcasts, and has guest hosted and produced for Afropop Worldwide on PRI. Nadia has also produced for None on Record editing and mixing stories of queer Africans, and worked on a Spanish language radio show called Epicentro based out of Washington DC. She graduated from Kenyon College with a double major in International Studies and Spanish Literature.

REVISITING POSADAS

The Christmas story of Mary and Joseph seeking refuge in a strange land has a special significance for Mexican immigrants in the United States. Latino USA host Maria Hinojosa visits Spanish Harlem for Las Posadas, the reenactment of the Nativity story among friends and neighbors.


Click here to download this week’s show.

NOTICIANDO: MEXICAN MEDIA

Silencing the Mexican media has become a key strategy for organized crime in the ongoing drug war. And it remains so after the killing of 55 journalists and a total of 60,000 people across the country. We speak to Ana Arana, director of the MEPI Foundation in Mexico City and co-author of a new report that highlights the devastating effect of the drug war on the Mexican media.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Ana Arana is an U.S. investigative journalist and director of the Fundacion MEPI, an independent journalism project based at the Tecnologico de Monterry in Mexico City. MEPI promotes binational and regional investigations. Arana is a former Knight International Journalism Fellow in Mexico, where she trained investigative units at various news outlets. One of the investigative teams at the daily El Universal won Mexico’s National Press Award in 2008.

Arana´s work has appeared in Foreign Affairs, Newsweek, Salon., The Columbia Journalism Review, the New York Daily News, Business Week, and the Village Voice. The Miami Herald, CBS News. She is a former reporter for the San Jose Mercury News and was a foreign correspondent for The Miami Herald in Central America and Colombia in the 1980s and 1990s. She is a graduate of the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and San Francisco State University.

NOTICIANDO: VOCES

Mexican American women train to compete in Mexico’s Charro contest, raw poetry emerges from the Brooklyn projects, modernist architecture in Cuba, and an inside look at the masked men of Mexico’s Lucha Libre. These are documentary subjects on VOCES, a Latino arts and documentary showcase on public television. We speak to Sandie Pedlow, executive director of Latino Public Broadcasting.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Sandie Viquez Pedlow is the Executive Director of Latino Public broadcasting overseeing the development, production, and distribution of public media content that is representative of Latino people or address issues concerning Latino Americans. She brings to this position over 20 years experience in program development, production, and the development of international public media initiatives. Most recently she was Director, Station Relations for PBS Education where she led the implementation and marketing of PBS online and digital media products and services. Prior to PBS, Pedlow was Director of Programming Strategies, Associate Director of Cultural, Drama and Arts Programming, and Senior Program Officer with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting for 10 years. She managed the development and funding of national public broadcasting programs which addressed social and diversity issues, history, the arts and many aspects of American culture. Pedlow was a key member of the CPB team that managed the founding of LPB. Prior to this work, Pedlow developed and produced documentaries, cultural/arts television programs for SCETV and was the U.S. National Coordinator for INPUT, an international public television conference with more than 35 participating

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