Latino USA

Posts Tagged ‘racism’

Flirty Racism: It’s a Thing

“You’re beautiful for a Spanish woman. I love it when Spanish girls speak Spanish.”

“Are you full Asian? You don’t look full Asian.”

“You’re the first black person I’ve ever dated.”

The intention is to flatter by highlighting difference. To compliment a person of color by making them feel “exotic”. These are just some of the examples we got by going out on the streets of New York City and asking people of color if they’d ever experienced what author Rula Al-Nasrawi calls #FlirtyRacism. 

In her article for VICE, “Calling Me A Terrorist Is Not Flirting,” Al-Nasrawi talks about the many times she’s been exoticized as a Middle-Eastern woman and the not so few times people have hit on her by jokingly calling her “a terrorist.”

At first, people on the streets were a little bit confused with the term. But when Al-Nasrawi told them one of the many outrageous pick-up lines she gets, people suddenly got it. Almost immediately,  the men and women of color we talked to remembered a pick-up line that turned out to be incredibly insulting or awkward, because it focused on their ethnicity. 

We found the many subtypes of flirty racism out there. From the very common “you’re cute for your ethnic group”, to the exotic generalization (“you look like that only other actress I’m aware of from your ethnic background”), to the incredibly insulting “you can’t be … you’re too tall.”

We also asked people on the streets of New York City what the new flirting etiquette should be and we even got some sailors to react to Al-Nasrawi being cat-called a terrorist.

 

Rula

Rula Al-Nasrawi is a freelance journalist living in New York City. A California native, her work has been featured on the San Francisco Bay Guardian, VICE, The Atlantic and Galore magazines. Rula is a hardcore pug lover, and always finds time to giggle at a good pun. Tweet her @rulaoftheworld.

 

 

 

 

Photo by Tiziana Fabi AFP/Getty Images

Environmental Racism in San Diego

Barrio Logan’s multicolor murals at Chicano Park tell the story of the Chicano struggle. The residents of this poorer neighborhood in San Diego fought for it back in the seventies, and they now consider it the umbilical chord of this community, where 20,000 Latinos live right next to the factories and shops of the city’s maritime industry. The residents of Barrio Logan say their higher-than-average asthma rates are due to the factories that have bordered the neighborhood. Some argue it’s a case of environmental racism against San Diego’s poorer Latinos. Barrio Logan got re-zoned by city authorities to make it fully residential, but the maritime industry has lobbied for a referendum that would overturn the ban. Sandhya Dirks reports on the dispute between workers and industry executives and the residents of Barrio Logan. 

 

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UntitledSandhya Dirks covers city news and politics for radio, TV, and online as KPBS’ Metro reporter. She focuses not just on the political horserace, but on how policies affect people in the community. Prior to joining the KPBS Newsroom, Sandhya worked at Iowa Public Radio, where she covered the 2012 presidential campaign for that key state as well as state politics.

 

 

 

 

Photo courtesy of Sandhya Dirks

Shut Up And Listen: Lessons From #CancelColbert

On Thursday, March 27, Comedy Central’s The Colbert Report tweeted something it shouldn’t have — the punchline to a joke from the night before. That tweet sparked the trending #CancelColbert hashtag, and a debate that quickly erupted into an explosive argument about race, satire, and who is allowed to be offended by what. Latino USA producers Michael Simon Johnson and Daisy Rosario, along with sportswriter Tomas Ríos, sat down to talk about what happened, how it happened, and what, if anything, can be learned from the experience.

TomasRiosTomas Ríos is a paid-lance writer who has contributed to Deadspin, Sports on Earth, Slate, Pacific Standard and The Classical. He tweets @TheTomasRios

 

 

 

 

 

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Micheal_JohnsonMichael Simon Johnson is a Pittsburgh native who spent most of his childhood making music and groaning when his parents put on NPR in the car. So naturally he graduated from Emerson College with a degree in Sound Design, moved to New York and made his way into public radio. As an engineer, he has worked for Afropop Worldwide, WNYC’s Radio Rookies, and Jazz at Lincoln Center. He commits much of his time to working on radio and multimedia projects but can often be found playing the bass, rock climbing, and traveling.

 

 

 

Daisy-Rosario-headshot-150x150Daisy Rosario is a comedian, writer and producer of things from radio stories to live events. Recently graduated from the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, she also works with The Moth and the Upright CitizensBrigade Theatre. Daisy has interned at Radiolab, taken a play she directed to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, and is an obsessive baseball fan. Her story “Child of Trouble,” was featured on the Peabody award-winning Moth Radio Hour. She holds a BFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts.

 

 

 

Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images

 

 

RACISM IN CUBA

Since 1959, the Cuban government has combatted racial discrimination. Officially all Cubans had the same opportunities.  But since the harsh economic times in the 1990s, black Cubans complain of increasing racial discrimination. Reese Erlich reports from Havana on this controversial issue.


Click here to download this week’s show.

Reese Erlich is a best-selling book author and freelance journalist who writes regularly for the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Radio, Marketplace Radio and National Public Radio.

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