Arizona Dreamers Five Years Later

Dulce Matuz started a new life as an undocumented American in Arizona when she was 15 years old. She was a star student, participated on the robotics team in high school and got into the engineering program at Arizona State University. In 2006, Arizona passed Proposition 300, which stripped undocumented students of in-state tuition for school and forced a lot of undocumented students to drop out of school. Dulce had a choice: self-deport or stay and fight. She chose the latter. Dulce co-founded the Arizona Dream Act Coalition to fight for immigrant rights while Arizona was in the process of enacting some of the nation’s strictest anti-immigration laws. Maria Hinojosa recently met up with Matuz in Phoenix to talk about what’s happening with Arizona politics around immigration today, five years after Arizona passed its controversial “show me your papers law,” SB 1070.

Photo by Marlon Bishop/Latino USA

SB 1070: BEHIND THE LAW

The Supreme Court’s mixed decision on Arizona’s immigration law prompted both skepticism and debate. The Court ruled against most of the law’s provisions but left one standing–the one known as the “papers, please” provision, which allows state and local police to question individuals on their immigration status. How did Latino groups in Arizona react? Seth Freed Wessler of Colorlines reports. Click here to read Seth’s work.

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Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Colorlines.

Seth Freed Wessler is an award-winning journalist who’s reported on immigration, the safety net, criminal justice and the human fallout of the financial collapse. He lives in New York where he works as an investigative reporter for Colorlines.com and a senior researcher at the Applied Research Center.Seth was recently awarded the Hillman Prize for his groundbreaking Colorlines.com investigation on deported parents who lose their children to foster care. In April, he was in the Supreme Court for oral arguments in Arizona v. United States, the SB 1070 case.