SB 1070: BEHIND THE LAW

The Supreme Court’s mixed decision on Arizona’s immigration law prompted both skepticism and debate. The Court ruled against most of the law’s provisions but left one standing–the one known as the “papers, please” provision, which allows state and local police to question individuals on their immigration status. How did Latino groups in Arizona react? Seth Freed Wessler of Colorlines reports. Click here to read Seth’s work.

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Click here to download this week’s show. Image courtesy of Colorlines.

Seth Freed Wessler is an award-winning journalist who’s reported on immigration, the safety net, criminal justice and the human fallout of the financial collapse. He lives in New York where he works as an investigative reporter for Colorlines.com and a senior researcher at the Applied Research Center.Seth was recently awarded the Hillman Prize for his groundbreaking Colorlines.com investigation on deported parents who lose their children to foster care. In April, he was in the Supreme Court for oral arguments in Arizona v. United States, the SB 1070 case.

SB 1070: BEYOND THE LAW

What does the “papers, please” provision of SB 1070 mean for Latinos? Anthony Romero, the executive director for the American Civil Liberties Union, talks to host Maria Hinojosa and outlines how the Supreme Court ruled on Arizona immigration law SB 1070, why he considers it legalized racial profiling, as well as next steps on the community and legal fronts.

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Click here to download this week’s show. Photo courtesy of Favianna Rodriguez.

Anthony D. Romero is the Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, the nation’s premier defender of liberty and individual freedom. He took the helm of the organization just four days before the September 11, 2001 attacks.  Romero also led the ACLU in establishing the John Adams Project, a joint effort with the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers to assist the under-resourced military defense lawyers in the Guantánamo military commissions. Born in New York City to parents who hailed from Puerto Rico, Romero was the first in his family to graduate from high school. He is a graduate of Stanford University Law School and Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public Policy and International Affairs. He is a member of the New York Bar Association and has sat on numerous nonprofit boards.